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January 07, 1966 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1966-01-07

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PAGE TWO

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE TWO TilE MICHIGAN DAILY

FRIDAY, JANUARY 7,1966

w

'THAT DARN CAT':
Disney Film Sunny, Sinless;
Great for Kid Sisters
ByROBERT MOORE ing foray into, literally, a federal husband, a mamma's boy duck-
At the Michigan Theatre case. The cat, D.C., is probably hunter, and a confused jeweler.
After they park their bicycles the most effective actor in the Venerable Ed Wynn plays one of
Ate:15ra they atherbtoge movie. Cool and athletic, it peram- the incidental parts.
at 7p5 a.m., they gather together bulates up the wrong stairway in- Blundering and blonde as usual,
ball befopreaygr Around 12 noon to a den of bank robbers who are Hayley Mills plays little Patti
they have cheese sandwiches and holding a bank teller hostage. D.C., Randall, the movie's main char-
warm milk-toast for lunch. At 5 naturally, doesn't lose his cool; acter. (Little did I say? It must
wam mhiyk-tdasthorlurnce h m-in his own sweet time, D.C. takes be noted that Miss Mills, although
melv. they pedal home, brace them- the Federal Bureau of Investiga- not grown up, is growing up.
selves with fortified whole milk tion on an electronic wild cat- Gentlemen, an era is ending.)
and orange juice, and go to bed chase (it takes 50 minutes on the Miss Mills' considerable talents
w tg . screen!). Finally, all ends in jus- are wasted, unfortunately. Except
The Walt Disney movie-ma- tice, love, and a Bobby Darin for one short impersonation scene,
chine mentality may not lead a theme song. the funny-faced teenager does
life as childish as all that; but A comedy can either make you nothing that most other young
there is a quality about Disney laugh on the outside or- amuse actresses couldn't do. Dorothy
movies that leads yott to believe you on the inside. This is a belly- Provine and Dean Jones provide
the writer was six, the producer laugh movie, with a good, spright- love interest, good looks, and not
seven, and the business manager ly dialogue and a gag-sprinkled much else.
fifteen. plot. Disney's trolls do not achieve Your little sister would like the
Walt Disney movies are con- the respectability of sophistica- movie very much. So would your
sistenly implausible, shallow and tion, but then, they never tried, senile uncle in Omaha who laughs
bright as a :child's daydream. It In the sunlit, sinless, suitable-for- too loud. It is a good silly movie;
is almost as easy to enjoy them as family-viewing tone they adopt, but, unfortunately, silly movies
it is to criticize them. "That Darn Cat" is good, but not aren't very good.
The latest Disney movie to great. There will never be a Disney
toddle into Ann Arbor is "That The best parts of the movie are movie about Viet Nam, sex or the
Darn Cat," a family comedy about the incidental characters thrown problem of alienation in society.
an inscrutable Siamese cat that in like big hunks of chocolate: a A Disney movie is always a game,
glides from a simple alley-pick- nosey neighbor, a long-suffering aimed at delight and not depth.
AT U. OF TEXAS:
Former, Harvard Professor
Breaks,*Agreement To Teach

moommu

Suspended
Students
Reinstated
Collegiate Press Service
BOWLING GREEN, Ky.
-A court ruling nas temporarily
reinstated three students to West-
ern Kentucky State College after
they were suspended for a satire
on sex which appeared in their
off -campus magazine.
The three-Robert Johns, Sam-
uel Lawson and Frank Bonasso,
all juniors-were suspended in-
definitely by a faculty committee
after the article, "In Defense of
Morality," which satirized the
social practice of "allowing males
complete sexual freedom while re-
quiring women to remain chaste,"
appeared in the second issue of
their mimeographed publication,
the Skewer.
Travel
They went into Warren County'
Circuit Court after an appeal to
Western President Kelly Thomp-
son was turned down. They wrote
Thompson that they had "in-
tended no discredit to Western."
"Vulgarity is noncompatible with
the purposes and objectives of
Western," Thompson said. The
basic issue, he declared, was
whether an institution "has the
right and responsibility to es-
tablish a moral and ethical cli-
mate for its students."
The court order was given pend-
ing a final appeal to the regents
of the college. It will allow the
students to return to classes. The
three charged before the court
that the suspension was "arbi-
trary and malicious," that it vio-
lated Kentucky and United States
constitutional provisions regard-
ing due process, and that the
publication was a part of their
private lives and should not affect
their relationship with Western.
Not Obscene
Western Dean of Students
Charles Keon, a member of the
faculty committee which handed
down the suspensions, said the ar-
ticle in the Skewer was neither
obscene nor profane but "was
written in such a way as to be
generally objectionable."
Johns, Lawson and Bonasso are
seeking help from the American
Civil Liberties Union and the
American Association of Univer-
sity Professors. The Louisville
chapter of Sigma Delta Chi, pro-
fessional journalism society, has
appointed a three-man committee
to investigate the incident.
Read The
Daily!

MANNING LECTURE:
Says Activists Must Be
Thinkers, Students Too

By BRUCE WASSERSTEIN
The great danger with student
activism is "pretense" according
to John Manning, administrative
assistant to the dean of junior-
senior counseling.
Manning, giving the keynote
speech during a student-faculty
discussion of student activism dur-
ing orientation, said that the
student activist must carefully
balance his role as a student and
as an activist. "If you belie one
or the other," Manning said, "you
will be a phoney."
The ideal model of the student
activist according to Manning is
as the modern decendent of the
balanced "renaissance man."
Thought with Action
According to Manning physical
action such as protests must be
balanced by genuine intellectual
stimulation.
The activist, according to Man-
ning, must act out of intellectual
commitment rather than acting
for the sake of acting. Otherwise,
Manning said, the activist is
doomed to failure.
Yet, Manning noted that there
is considerable conflict between
the "academic pressures of a great
university and one's dedication to
the activist cause. And, Manning
commented, sometimes the pro-
duct of this conflict is the per-
son who discovers that he cannot
both be a student and an activist.
Protests Natural To Campuses
Manning however said that it
is natural for protest movements
to flourish on university cam-
puses because of the blending of
liberalism and idealism which are
present.
The idealism of the campus, he
said, is a byproduct of the rise of
social morality in our society.
DIAL 8-6416
"WAY-OUT .. . FUNNY!
IF YOU'RE LOOKING FOR
A FILM THAT'S DIFFER-
ENT, THIS IS CERTAINLY
IT!"
-=William Well, Cue-Magazine

While dogmatic moralism has
fell into intellectual disfavor,
Manning said, students are taking
on the values of the idealistic
academic community.
Today's Activism
Manning remarked that essen-
tially students are no more "ac-
tive" than students of other gen-
erations. The difference is that
their interests lie in more publicly
noticeable areas. Manning point-
ed out that the public does not
notice when students use their
energy as fraternity officers and
homecoming committee members,
but do when they are protesting!
the war in Viet Nam.

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By NANCY KOWERT
Collegiate Press Service
AUSTIN, Tex.-A retired Har-
vard English professor and Pulit-
zer Prize-winning author has bro-
ken an agreement to teach at
the University of Texas because
he refused to sign the state-
required "Loyalty Oath."
Dr. Howard Mumford Jones,
who described the oath as "thor-
oughly vicious," was to be a visit-
ing professor of English during the
spring semester. He had taught
general literature at Texas from
1919 to 1925.
It was the second loyalty oath
case this fall. Earlier, Bayard
Rustin, a controversial civil rights
leader, refused to sign the Mary-
land loyalty oath before appear-
ing at the University of Maryland.
Rustin did speak after the state's
attorney general ruled the oath
was not necessary for one or two
appearances.
Oath Unexpected
The 73-year-old Jones, an ex-
ORGANIZATION
NOTICES
USE OF THIS COLUMN FOR AN-
NOUNCEMENTS is available to officially
recognized and registered student or-
ganizations only. Organizations who
are planning to be active for the Spring
Term must be registered in the Office
of Student Organizations by Jan. 27,
1966. Forms are available in Room 1011
SAB.
* * *
Bahat Student Group, Fireside dis-
cussion: "The Future of Man," Fri.,
Jan. 7, 8 pm., 3545 SAB. All interested
welcome.
Guild House, Friday noon lunch,
"The Climate of Protest in the Univer-
sity," Vice-President Richard Cutler,
Jan. 7, 12-1 p.m., Guild House, 802
Monroe.
* * *
Newman Student Association, Com-
munity mass and supper, 5 p.m.,
square dance, 8 p.m., Newman Student
Center, 331 Thompson.

pert on -American literature and
culture, had made arrangements
with the Texas administration to
come to Austin next February.
"Then, they sprang the Loyalty
Oath on me," Jones. said. "It's a
disclaimer oath, not a loyalty
oath," Jones told the Daily Texan
by telephone, saying he feels such
oaths "assume a person is guilty
until he proves himself innocent."
The oath, in its present form,
was. passed by the Texas legisla-
ture in 1953 and requires that
every potential state employe
(which includes all university per-
sonnel):
- . . Is not and never has
been a member of the Communist
Party;
. . . Has not during the pre-
ceding five-year period been a
member of any organization which
the U.S. Attorney General has
designated as totalitarian, fascist,
communist, or subversive;
-- ... Has not during the pre-
ceding five-year period been a
member of any communist politi-
cal organization.
"This faculty oath violates the
principles of the American Asso-
ciation of University Professors,"
Jones wrote in a letter telling
Chancellor Ranson of his decision.
"It violates the principles of
equity since attached to the form
is a list of scores (a total of 290)
of organizations alleged to be sub-
versive or disloyal on the grounds
that they appear on some other
lists compiled I know not how,"
the letter continued.
"I have combatted this kind of
oath all my life as a member of
the faculty at various state uni-
versities and at Harvard Univer-
sity," he wrote.
Calls Oath 'Affront'
"I once (in 1950) declined to
teach during the summer term at
the University of California (at
Los Angeles) because that institu-
tion then demanded an oath like
yours."
Jones went on to say that "the

oath is an affront to me as a,
responsible American citizen who
has worked for his government
and several times taken an oath
to defend it."
Dr. Norman Hackerman, vice
chancelor in charge of academic
affairs, said he "regretted Jones'
decision not to come to the uni-
versity." He said the university
has a "neutral position" toward
the oath. "We just administer it,"
he said.
"He said earlier this year that
he would be glad to come," Dr.
C. L. Cline, chairman of the Eng-
lish department said. "It was only
when he got the official papers to
fill out that he balked., We made
him an offer of a salary beyond
anything made by any professor
in this department," Cline con-
tinued.
Jones was to teach senior and
graduate level English courses inl
American literature. The courses
will not be offered now that Jones
is not coming.
A Cross
Camputs

STARTING NEXT WEDNESDAY
"THOSE MAGNIFICENT MEN IN
THEIR FLYING MACHINES"
OE

It's
Murderously
;Funny

[

FRIDAY, JAN. 7
Noon - Richard Cutler, vice-
president of student affairs, will
speak on "the Climate of Protest
in the University" at the Guild
House; 802 Monroe. Lunch will be
served for 25c.
4 p.m.-Prof. Justin Aronfreed
of the University of Pennsylvania
will speak on "The Internalization
of Social Control through Punish-
ment" at a department of psy-
chology colloquium in Aud. B.
7 and 9 p.m.-Mae West and
Cary Grant will star in "I'm No
Angel" at the Cinema Guild in
the Architecture Aud.

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