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January 30, 1966 - Image 3

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The Michigan Daily, 1966-01-30

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SUNDAY, JANUARY 30, 1966

THE MICHIGAN RAIL'

PAGE THREE

SUNDAY, JANUARY 30, 1966 THE MICHIGAN DAILI PAGE THREE

Ho CM Minh's

Advisors

Hold Key to

Viet Peace

By The Associated Press
clustered about President Ho
Chi Minh, the aging Mandarin
whose name means "enlightened
one," is a group of men who hold
the option of signaling an interest
in peace or inviting ordeal by fire
which could pose the danger of
widened Asian war.
Among North Viet Nam's top
leaders are those whom President
Johnson deplored Friday as fana-
tics "pursuing the old cynical
strategy of rule or ruin." This'
implied that it was up to them
whether the United States resum-
4 ed bombing North Viet Nam or
whether there was hope of a
road to peace.
Ho, too, had something to say

Friday. He called President John-
son's peace gestures "an impu-
dent threat" and appealed for
increased aid from Communist
countries.
And again yesterday " Ho was
quoted as accusing the U.S. of
employing gas warfare and
scorched-earth tactics.
"If the U.S. really wants peace,
it must recognize the National
Liberation Front of South Viet
Nam as the genuine and only rep-
resentative of the South Viet-
namese people and enter direct
negotiations with same," the
broadcast quoted the message as
saying.
According to the radio, Ho Chi
Minh's note charged that "The

U.S. is trying to maintain a
puppet government in South Viet
Nam to perpetuate the division of
Viet Nam."
The Communist Vietnamese
leader accused the U.S. of follow-
ing "a policy of scorched earth,
burning and destroying everything
and using poisonous gas and
toxic chemical products to destroy
villages and assassinate the civil
population."
Ho Chi Minh charged "The U.S.
continues its spy flights over
North Viet Nam territory in pre-
paration of new aerial attacks on
our nation," the broadcast said.
"While the North American
armed forces' remain in our land,
the people will continue to fight

them," the radio quoted from the
note. "If the U.S. wants peace, it
must stop bombing our country
and other acts of aggression un-
conditionally."
The message denounced "the
false peace offensive of the U.S.,
while the North American im-
perialists extend the war in Viet
Nam."
Ho, who will be 76 in May,'
seems more and more a figure-
head. The frail, aristocratically
born lifetime revolutionist has
given the impression he sought to
avoid involvement in the Moscow-
Peking cold war over world Com-
munist strategy. Now his 10-man
Politburo seems caught up in a
struggle between the pro-Chinese

and the pro-Muscovites.
The pro-Chinese appear at the
moment to have the upper hand,j
though the contest probably still
is going on.
The principals:
Le Duan, 58, first secretary of
the Laodong Communist party.
Once wholly Chinese in outlook,
he now seems on the fence. As the
most powerful figure after Ho,
Duan might have authority to tip
the balance.
Duan became a party member
in the early 1930s. He spent 10
years in a French prison for sub-
version, and after emerging in
December, 1964, became top leader
of the Vietminh guerrillas in the
South. He is one, of the few

Southerners in a powerful position
the top party position. .
For years, without the actual
title, Duan was second man to Ho.
In 1959 he gained the title of
first secretary of the party. An
expert on relations with other
parties, he accompanied Ho on
trips to Peking and Moscow and
led his own delegations without
Ho on similar journeys. He may
become president after Ho moves
on. At present he seeems a little
less pro-Chinese than he sounded
in the past.
Truong Chinh, head of the Na-
tional Assembly. His name means
"long march," a pseudonym hon-
oring Mao Tze-tung's revolution-
ary exploit. He is a contender for

to be all Chinese in his outlook.
Chinh has been associated with!
Ho since the late 1920s and helped
him found the Indochinese party.!
After directing its propaganda, he
became its secretary-general in,
1941, operating inside China, and
he emerged again in North Viet
Nam in 1951 as the top secretary.
Pham Van Dong, premier, is one
of Ho's earliest associates and
long has been a Moscow-type
Communist. Now 60 years old, he
has been a revolutionary since
his early teens, when he was in
the Indonesian Communist move-
ment. He joined Ho in China in
1925, and went to South Viet Nam
to set up a revolutionary base in
1929. He spent six years at hard

labor in a French prison camp.
A founder, with Ho, of the
Vietminh guerrilla movement, he
has been premier of North Viet
Nam since partition of the coun-
try in 1954. Like Ho, he is at-
tentive to Moscow's guidelines but
seems now to be boxed in.
The decisions of these men,
along with Ho, will tell the story
in Viet Nam. Information from
the North is scarce, but there is
some fairly reliable reporting from
Europeans able to go in and out.
These sources report the division
and a victory of the pro-Chinese
faction dating back to last April,
when some pro-Moscow elements
were removed from important but
lower-echelon positions.

_ __ TI!ACTT !l &'DDT, JCT QTFIA.

Johnson
On Renc
WASHINGTON (AP) - President Vietnamese P
Johnson withheld a decigion on issued apparl
bombing North Viet Nam again jection yet
yesterday amid a papal appeal, feelers and
Senate criticism and an un- military lead
explained reduction in guerrilla backed earl:
assaults in South Viet Nam. strikes on th
At the same time his intelli- Ever since
gence reports showed Hanoi is peace offens:
continuing to send men and ma- son has bee
terial into the South. North the results o

Holds
val of

Decision
Bombiong

President Ho Chi Minh
ently his clearest re-
of Johnson's peace
many United States
ders and congressmen
y resumption of air
he% North.
he launched a global
ive 37 days ago, John-
en reported weighing
n a day-by-day basis.

There were these developments
yesterday as the President met
again with top advisors:
Arbitration
The White House promised
"prompt and full study" of Pope
Paul VI's suggestion for ending
the war by a UN arbitration
through neutral nations.
Privately, U.S. sources doubt'
that the Communists would aban-

don their previous refusal to take
the issue to the United Nations.
But administration officials are
pleased with the Pope's praise
of Johnson's peace campaign as
history-making, reasonably and
honorably intended.
Critic of U.S. Policy
Sen. Wayne Morse (D-Ore), a
bitter critic'of Johnson's Viet
Nam policy, introduced a resolu-
tion aimed at forcing a test vote
on what he termed Johnson's
claimed authority to conduct "an
undeclared and illegal war."
This followed some sharp sen-
ate attacks on U.S. government
policy Friday and calls for pro-
longing the bombing pause.
But Sen. Russell B. Long (D-
La), assistant majority leader,
said a 1964 resolution which Morse
attacked was "a declaration of
war." And he chided Morse in-
directly by saying, "This is not
the time to make speeches the
Communists can circulate behind
the Iron Curtain-it encourages

14-13.Heats yrr'.r "v i
Te mpers Franc
In Senate Of Co
Filibuster Ties Up LUXEMBOURG (P)-President
Charles de Gaulle's government
Saturday Session made a new effort yesterday to
On Right To Work convince the other countries in
the European Common Market
WASHINGTON (R) - Tempers that each should keep a veto over
flared in the Senate yesterday as important decisions. There was
an unusual and unpopular Satur- a possibility of a French con-
day session convened on the un-cession.
ion shop issue. The two-day meeting here took
Objections and rgument kept a dramatic turn when ministers
from West Germany, Holland and
the Senate in a turmoil during Italy hurried from the meeting
much of its firsthouras mem- room-apparently to telephone
bers quibbled over reading the their capitals. Informants reported
Journal, recessing vs. adjourn- hrcatasInomn rprd
ment, and other technicalities. the French presented a four-page
At issue in the filibuster-boundproposal listing issues which would
At isuein he iliustr-bundbe subjectd to a veto.
session is a bill to repeal Section These were said to include the
14B of the Taft-Hartley law, un- Common "Market position in the
der which 19 states have passed Kennedy round of talks on ut-
laws forbidding union shop con- ting tariffs and reducing other
tracts-those which require all trngetarifsand reducing othe
covered workers to join a union.' trade barriers, and policies of the
coveredworst a usion. Common Market itself on a series
Mansfield Calls Session of farm items: sugar, fruits, vege-
Senate Democratic Leader Mike tables, fats, oil, beef and dairy
Mansfield of Montana called the products.
Saturday session in an effort to Veto
speed up action, but he ran into The imno u i

not want to yield because its vital
national interests is threatened,
France reserves the right to boy-
cott the voting and the result of
the vote.
The result would, in fact, be a
veto without disturbing the letter
of the Common Market treaty
that France signed in 1957. This
provided for the veto to disappear
for most issues on Jan. 1, 1966.
The French have said that if
the veto question was settled they

BALLROOM DANCE LESSONS

Seeks Retention
imon Market Veto

would return to fulled cooperation
in the Common Market.
Boycott
France has backed up its de-
mand for a veto with a boycott
of most Common Market activities.
Agreement was reached yester-
day on a lesser issue raised by the
French: ho wto curb the powers
of the Common Market Commis-
sion, the independent executive
body that manages the Common
Market's day-to-day affairs.

Tuesdays
7-9 P.M.

Feb. 1-March 8
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i

a slowdown from the start.j
A combination of Republicans
and Democrats have been conduct-

them to keep up their terrorism." ing an easy filibuster by
n A1readings of the Journal

forcing
of the

Lul n Guerrxu a c iviy
Administration strategists stud-j
led the lower level of organized'
military attacks by the Red guer-
rillas which have been reported
from South Viet Nam for more
than a month now. The main
combat recently has resulted from
offensive thrusts, by U.S. and
South Vietnamese troops.
, Johnson has pledged publicly
that "we will respond if others
reduce their use of force but
Washington sources said they can
not see any clear political signi-
ficance yet in the reduced rate
of Viet Cong assaults.
It was noted that there have
been periodic lulls in the guer-
rilla activity in the past, followed
by step-ups after the Viet Cong
regrouped and built up supplies.
White House Asst. press secre-
tary Joseph Laitin described as
"consistent with the Communist
party line" and as "nothing new"
Ho Chi Minh's letter to Com-
munist and other government
chiefs broadcast by Hanoi Radio
Friday.
Ho's letter denounced Johnson's
14-point peace package and his
proposal for unconditional dis-
cussions and said "the Vietnamese
people will never submit to U.S.
threats.",

previous day, frequent quorum
calls and lengthy speeches. They
continued their tactics.
At the outset Mansfield asked
unanimous consent to approve Fri-
day's Journal without having it
read.
Fannin Stalls
Sen. Paul J. Fannin (R-Ariz),
acting in place of GOP leader
Everett M. Dirksen of Illinois,
objected.
"The objection comes too late,"
Mansfield put in.
But Sen. Lee Metcalf (D-Mont),
presiding, ruled that Fannin was
on his feet in time. Mansfield
withdrew his protest.
Mansfield then asked that when
the Senate quits Saturday it re-
cess until 10 a.m. Monday - two
hours earlier than normal.
Fannin and Sen. Sam J. Ervin,
Jr. (D-NC) objected to that.
Roll-Call
ApparentlyRirritated by contin-
uing objections, Mansfield at one
point moved to adjourn and to
demand a roll-call vote on the is-
sue.
He also objected to a projected
speech. But in the end he with-
drew his motion, Fannin and Er-
vin withdrew their objection to
the early start Monday ,and rou-
tine returned.

was that the veto need not apply
on other issues. Previously the
French had taken the stand that
any issue should be subject to the
veto if a member nation claimed
its national interests were en-
dangered.
West European leaders were
trying to keep the Common Mar-
ket together by finding a way to
guarantee that none of the six
member nations could be outvoted
on matters of vital importance to
The ministers from France,
Italy, West Germany, Belgium,{
the Netherlands and Luxem-
bourg seemed to be moving toward
a solution along these lines, as
proposed by the French: On dif-
ficult issues special efforts would
be made to reach unanimous
agreement.
National Interest
If a member country says it does

Wednesdays
7-9 P.M.

Feb. 2-Feb. 23
$4.00

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Feb. 1-March 15
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BRIDGE II LESSONS

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8:30-10 P.M.

Feb. 1-March 15
$6.00

SIGN UP IN FISHBOWL

Mondqy

Jan. 31

8-5

I__

-Associated Press

t

JOHNSON AIDES CHECK BUDGET
President Johnson, with aid Jack Valenti and Press Secretary Bill Moyers checks figures from his
recently announced budget requests.
orld ews Roundup

rr,.,.--4L. Tr--An fntln┬źraR ii n hic .

I -- -U - 9 ____z - 4.-A 10--

4I~

By The Associated Press -Kennetn ┬▒aunuatonoweu up jmu
QTJANG NGAI, South Viet Namfiring of two cabinet ministers
-Thousands of U.S. Marines with an announcement yesterday
landed Friday south of this cen- that he had directed Vice-Presi-
dent Reuben Kamanga to become
tral lowlands town in what was Zambia's chief delegate at the
described as the biggest am- United Nations.
phibious assault since Inchon in
the Korean War. In The announcement came on the
The announcement of the land-n heels of the removal of the two
ing was delayed by military ministers and a parliamentary sec-
authorities until last night for retary in connection with business
reasons of security. deals involving $336,000.
Government sources say inves-
CHICAGO-A federal court jury tigations into alleged corruption
that spent nine months hearing are being conducted at the high-
evidence against Dr. Andrew C. est level-and involve many sen-
Ivy and three others on fraud ior government officials.
and conspiracy in promoting the 4
drug kreziozen found Ivy and Mar- LOS ANGELES - Local leaders
ko Durovic innocent on all counts threatened yesterday to bolt from
yesterday. the United Steelworkers Union in
The jury of seven women and protest against a contract an in-
five men also found Dr. F. P. ternational officer signed with
Phillips, a Chicago physician, in- Harvey Aluminum Co.
nocent on all counts. Americo Argenta, president of
The jury reported it had not Local 6700, predicted overwhelm-
yet reached a decision on the evi- ing opposition to Friday's contract
dence against Dr. Stevan Durovic, would be voiced at a meeting of
discoverer of the drug, and re- the local's 1700 members today.
ported it will continue its delib-
erations. Regional director Charles Smith
* * * said the contract, first in a 15-
LUSAKA. Zambia - President year effort to organize the plant

in suburban Torrance, was below
national pay scales but was "a
good start."
Smith, who signed the contract,
predicted members would approve
it today "when they have had a
chance, without disruptions from
men like Argenta, to listen to the
terms of the agreement."
WASHINGTON - Secretary of
Labor W. Willard Wirtz urged all
federal-state employment service
officers last night to help find
employment for school teachers
who lose their jobs as a result of
school integration.

s
1
E
1
1
i
F

_ _ _
t

In association with the American Playwrights Theatre ..
UNIVERSITY PLAYERS, Department of Speech
THIS WEEK!
PRIOR TO BROADWAY!
THE DAYS BETWEEN
By Robert Anderson
author of
FEBRUARY 2-5 "All Summer Long"
8 P.M. Trueblood Auditorium "Tea and Sympathy"
Silent Night, Lonely Night"
BOX OFFICE OPENS TOMORROW 12:30-5
OPEN UNTIL 8 ON PERFORMANCE DATES

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HAVE IT MADE-
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Campus Rep. Richard Rogers, P.O. Box 112. Tel. 448-2932
CALL ANYTIME-662-5676

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And everyone else on the staff.
There will be a
LZIUrcAVIFf

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WITH FULL COMPREHENSION & RETENTION
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