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January 29, 1966 - Image 2

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1966-01-29

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PAGE TWO

THE MICHIGAN BATIM

k'AU TWOTHEMI~fJV to fAITV.aL.

SATURDAY. JANUARY '29.1966

8

i

Antonioni' s 'Eclipse'
Shows Love's Death",

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DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN
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SATURDAY. JANUARY 29, 1966

By DAVID KNOKE
With the arrival of Michael-
angelo Antonioni's "Eclipse," the
Cinema Guild appears to be leav-
ing an era of camp classics and
entering into the more promising
realm of serious cinematographic
presentations.
"Eclipse" is the third part of
a trilogy that began with "L'av-
ventura" and La Notte." It is
plotless, without real beginning
or end, kept vacillating between
soft focus and scorches of light.
One comes abruptly into the
parting of old lovers, follows the
girl (Monica Vitti) as she searches
for her mother in the stock ex-
change, becomes entangled with a
young broker, tries to extricate
herself and leaves the audience in
unresolved quandary at the film's
end.
Symbolism
At the end, the camera has for-
gotten the lovers and follows the
day out until the image of a street
light sears the'screen, artificial
invention eclipsing reality. Sym-
bolism? Sure, the new wave thrives
on it. Of course, this opens up
the question of which interpreta-
tion-if any-does one take as
valid?
Several critics have criticized
Miss Vitti for a prolonged ap-
pearance which she does not have
the artistic reservoir to sustain.
Her character 'is similar to the
one played by Julie Christie in
"Darling" - young girl stricken
with malaise and disbelief in the
validity of love - yet her pre-
sentation is entirely different.'

There is a worm gnawing at
her heart; she wants to be free,
to break' out of the constricting
bonds of mother, job, lovers, pro-
priety. But everywhere she turns,
from every camera angle she is
hemmed in, pressed down, crushed
and obliterated by her world.
Her world is semi-surrealistic,
structured in glass, brick, stone
and plastic cubes. Phallic symbols
abound-she draws back a cur-
tain and stares out at a distant
water tower, pensively drops a
stick into a rain barrel-yet the
overall impression she creates
could not be more sexless.
Critics' Interpretation
When the film first appeared
in Italy in 1962, Alberto Moravia
and several other left-leaning
critics interpreted Antonioni's
theme as an attack on money and
the way it alienates people who
try to serve both Mammon and
Aphrodite.
It is not difficult to see the film
from this view point. Fear of
poverty motivates the livid faces
of the brokers, fearfully circled
around the exchange, yelling,
screeching their desperate orders
in trying to beat the panic.
But the film is not about money,
nor is it about the inability of
people to communicate. One feels;
they communicate only too well,
despite the long stretches of si-
lence which invade the film. What
Antonioni has to tell will be in-i
terpreted differently by each per-
son who sees "Eclipse"; and
rightfully so, for that is the hall-
mark of great art.

The Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publication of the Univer-
sity of Michigan, for which The
Michigan Daily assumes no editor-
ial responsibility. Notices should be
sent in TYPEWRITTEN form to
Room 3519 Administration Bldg. be-
fore 2 p.m. of the day preceding
publication, and by 2 p.m. Friday
for Saturday and Sunday. General
Notices may be published a maxi-
mum of two times on request; Day
Calendar items appear once only.
Student organization notices are not
accepted for publication.
SATURDAY, JANUARY 29
Day Calendar
Professional Theatre Program Per-
formance-American Conservatory The-
atre Company in Moliere's "Tartuffe":
Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre, 2:30 and 8
p.m.
Cinema Guild-Antonioni's "Eclipse":
Architecture Aud., 7 and 9 p.m.
Hockey-U-M vs. Michigan Technolog-
ical University: Coliseum, 8 p.m.
Professional Theatre Program Special
Late: Show - American Conservatory
Theatre Company in Samuel Beckett's
"Endgame": Lydia Mendelssohn Thea-
tre, 11 p.m.
General Notices
Women Students' Karate Club: Dur-
ing the Open Hour on Tues., Feb. 1,
at Barbour Gymnasium, 7 p.m., a Ka-
rate Club for women students will
have the opportunity of organizing.
Attendance is urged at this meeting in
order to make the group become a
reality.
European Travel and Jobs: Informa-
tion on tour travel and jobs available
in Europe for the summer. Short talk
followed by informal discussions. 737
Packard, Sat., 2:30-5 p.m.; Sun. 2:30-5
p.m. and 7:30-10 p.m.
Summary of Action Taken by Student
Government Council at Its Meeting
January 27, 1966
Approved: That Freshman and Soph-
omore women living in Residence Halls
and Sorority House who plan to at-
tend "Westside Story" may arrange for
a late permission.
Approved: That Student Government
Council grant temporary recognition to
the Student Organization Cinema II.
Approved: That ,the Student Legal
Defense committee of Graduate Stu-
dent Council be allowed to sponsor a
one day bucket drive during the month
of February, the exact date of which
shall be approved , by the executive
vice-president and that the committee
be allowed to conduct other solicita-
tions on campus according to rules
applicable to individual college and
housing units.
Approved: That the Tuitorial and
Cultural Relations Project be allowed
to sponsor a bucket drive on either
Feb. 10 or 11 from 9 to 5.
Approved: That Interfraternity Coun-
cil be allowed to sponsor an all cam-
pus dance on Feb. 4 from 8:30-12:30 in
the Union Ballroom, the proceeds of
which shall be contributed to the
American Cancer Society.
Approved: That Thomas A. Brown,
Douglas A. Brook and Prof. Douglas
Kahn be appointed to the Membership
Tribunal for terms of one (1) year to
expire on Jan. 31, 1967.
Approved: That Student Government
Council set March 2 as the final date
for submission of Class I calendar re-
quests.
Approved :That SGC tsaablish an
International Campus Chest Fund to
benefit international organizations con-
cerned with health, education, and
welfare.
I. Financing: Except for an initial
loan of $50 for administrative purposes,
the fund shall be maintained by mon-
ies collected from a campus-wide buck-
et drive and donations from student

organizations. The drive shall be con-
ducted by the SGC International Co-
ordinators during International Empha-
sis Month and shall encourage parti-
cipation from, other student organiza-
tions.
II. Disbursement of Funds: A selec-
tions committee composed of SGC
treasurer and SGC international co-
ordinators shall recommend to SGOC the
recipients and respective amounts of
the fund to be allocated. A member
of the International Center Staff shall
serve as advisor to the selection com-
mittee. A simple majority of SGC
shall be required to confirm alloca-
tions.
Approved: That the $500 which was
allocated by SGC for the Louis Lomax
visit be left in a Writer-in-Residence
Fund for future use.
Approved: That Student Government
Council approve the following slate of
candidates for interview and considera-
tion for the vacant Council seat: Ruth
Bauman, Joan L. Irwin, David William
Smith.
Approved: That Ruth Bauman fill
the vacant seat on the Council.
Approved: That SGC present to the
Regents a proposal for a student-
faculty committee which would partici-
pate in the preliminary and final de-
cisions regarding the new University
president (unanimously approved).
Approved: That SGC allow Winter
weekend to modify Section 4 of the
Block Ticket Sales Policy such that
those housing units participating in
the Skit Night on Feb. 25 at the
Hill Aud. will be given first choice
for bloc ktickets, to be scattered
through the auditorium, before seats
are opened to the public.
Approved: That Student Government1
Council extend an invitation to mem-
bers of the Ann Arbour Housing Com-
mission to sit in on an ex-officia
capacity without vote on the Execu-
tive Board of the Student Housing As-
sociation for the purpose of aidings
communication between the two bodies1
(unanimously approved).1
Approved: That SGC accept the fol-
lowing evaluation and send copies of it.
to the Human Relations Commission
staff of the City of Ann Arbor:l
1) A careful study should be made1
of the present relationship between
the police and the low-income corn-1
munity, so that any program can be
aimed at the existent problems. The
facilities of the University's psychol-
ogy and sociology departments couldC
be utilized in this research.
2) The most important single aspect
of the program is proper training for
those involved in running the ac-
tivities. The "eight-hour orientation"
should be studied to make sure that it
is sufficient to train the officers in
handling the problems which will oc-
cur. It is not easy for a person to
change his attitude singly because he
is off-duty and careful screening and
training must be utilized to prevent
a possible negative effect from the
program. Ideas on actual procedures
could possibly be gotten by contacting
various police athletic leagues which
conduct somewhat similar athletic ac-
tivities.

3) Community involvement in all as-
pects should be maximized. Parents
should be made aware of the poten-
tial benefits of participation by their
children. The most articulate indigen-
ous youth should be chosen to serve
as the staff aides. If they can be made
to see the value of the program, then
both their peers and the younger chil-
dren who are influenced by them will
be more inclined to respect and join
the program 'in its present or ex-
panded future form.
4) One specific kind of activity
which could be most beneficial is in-
volving the children in the actual
daily duties of the policeman. A five
to eight year old might not asso-
ciate an off-duty officer in civilian
clothes with the uniformed man in
the police car. Trips in police cars as
the officers make their rounds and
visits to the police station will help
convey the idea that policemen are
indeed people like everyone else.
5) Clarification should be made on
minor ambiguous points such as "Com-
munity aides would be hired in an
hourly basis at the rate of $5000 per
year and would be hired as needed."
Most of these points were cer-
tainly implicit in the first draft, butI
we think that the presentation of the
program would be strengthened by the
inclusion of these certain elaborations.
Placement 3
ANNOUNCEMENTS:1
Peace Corps Placement Test-Deter-
mines in what capacity you can best
serve. Test will be given Sat., Feb. 12
at 9 a.m. at Downtown Post Office,
Main & Catherine. To take test ques-
tionnaires must be completed. Details
& applications available at Bureau of
Appointments.
Graphic Arts Technical Foundation,
Pittsburgh, Pa. -- Announces fellow-
ships for grad study for men in-
terested in printing industry. Attend
Pitts. area schools & gain experience
in res. lab. Background in engig. or
sciences desired. No exper. in printing
trades req. Details at Bureau of Ap-
pointments.
POSITION OPENINGS:
Crown Personnel, Inc., Mt. Prospect,
Ill.-Employment Counselor. Lib. Arts
or Indust. Rel. degree. Man or woman
able to deal with people to interview,
counsel & arrange appts. for mfg, per-
sonnel, engrs., etc.
J. V. Bailey Nurseries, St. Paul, Minn.
r

-Plant Pathologist/Entomologist. B
MS pref. Trng. in plant pathology, e
tomology, soils, etc. Man with far
bkgd. & able to handle machine
desirable. Manage insect & disease co
trol, soil testing, gen. trouble shoo
ing, etc.
Bethlehem Steel Corp., Bethlehen
Pa.-1. Systems Analysts. BS Mathc
engrg. or strong math bkgd. 1 y
programming exper. 3 yrs. EDP e
per. 2. Systems Tech., BS Math, engri
or strong bkgd. in math. No expe
req., but helpful. Positions availablea
Burns Harbor, Ind.
West Virginia Pulp & Paper, N.Y.C.
Industrial Sales trainee. Leads to sal
or mktg. mgmt. BA, MS or MBA, an
major. Exper. not req., some sales ex
per, helpful. 5-15 mos. trng. in N.Y.C,
For further information, please ca
764-7460, General Div., Bureau of Ap
pointments, 3200 SAB.
SUMMER PLACEMENT SERVICE:
212 SAB-
INTERVIEWS:
FEB. 1-
Camp Fairwood & Four Way Lodg
Coed, Torch Lake, Mich.-Swimming in
structor, arts & crafts, sports fassist
ants. Married couples may apply.
New England Mutual Life Insurance
Boston, Mass.-Actuarial students.
FEB. 2-
Fair Winds Girl Scout Council, Flin
Mich.-Unit leaders & ass'ts., water
front staff, & business manager.
FEB. 3-

3S,
m-'
m
ry
n-
t-
m,
or
yr.
'x-
g,
er.
at
es
ny
x-
311
P-
e,
n-
I;-
3C,
.t

Equitable Life Insurance, N.Y.C. -
Actuarial students.
For details & appointments, stop in
at Summer Placement, 212 SAB.
ENGINEERING PLACEMENT INTER-'
VIEWS-Seniors & grad students, please
sign schedule posted at 128-H West
Engrg.
THURS., FEB. 3--
Cummins Engine Co.. Columbus, Ind.
-Any Degree: EM, ME. BS-MS: IE.
MS: Constr.. Info. & Controls. R. &
D., Des., Prod., Sales.
City of Detroit, Mich.-BS-MS: EE,
ME, Chem. MS: constr., Public Works
Admin., Sanitary. BS: CE, E Math,
EM, E Physics, Mat'is., Sci. Engrg. Citi-
zens & non-citizens becoming citizen.
Dev., Des., Prod., Field.
General Foods Corp., All plant loa-
tions--BS-MS: ChE, EE, EM. IE, ME.
MS: Info. & Controls. BS: E Math, Sci.
Engrg. R. & D., Des., Prod.
THURS.-FRI., FEB. 3-4--
Minnesota Mining & Mfg. Co., St.
Paul, Minn.-BS-MS: ChE, ME. BS: IE.
R. & D., Des., Prod., Tech. Service.
U.S. Naval Ordinance Test Station,
China Lake, Calif.-Any Degree: Aero.,

ChE, E, ME, Physics. MS: Chem. &0
Math. R. & D., Des.
FRI., FEB. 4-
American Can Co., Midwest & East-
BS-MS: ChE, IE, ME, Met. R. & D.,
Des., Prod., Indust. Engrg.
Cornell Aeronautical Lab., Inc., Buf-
falo, N.Y.-Any Degree: Aero., EE, ME.
SMS-PhD: Physics, Applied Math, Psy-
chology. BS: E Math, E Physics, Sci.
Engrg. Prof.: Applied Mech. R. & D.,
Sales Res.
Diamond Alkali Co., Cleveland. Ohio
-Any Degree: ChE. BS-MS: EE, ME. BS:
IE. Men only. U.S. citizens & foreign
nationals of S. America for assignments
in Latin America after 3-5 years trng.
. program in U.S. R. & D.. Des., Prod.,
Sales.
Kelsey-Hayes Co., Detroit, Ohio. Pa..
Ill.-BS-MS: EE, EM,.ME. BS: CE, E#
Math, Met. Men only. R. & D. Des.,
Prod., Sales.
Lear Siegler, Inc., Grand Rapids,' Mich.
-BS, MS, Prof.: Aero., EE, ME. Prof.:
Applied Mech. MS: EM. MS. Prof.:
Info. & controls. R. & D., Des., Prod.
Marathon Oil Co., Detroit, Mich.;
Findlay, Ohio; Robinson, Ill.-BS-MS.

ChE, E, ME Prod

r-

Hi Fi STUDIO
January Sale
PRICE REDUCTIONS
stock of Radio, Phono,
on a Wide and Varied
and Hi Fi Components.
1319 S. Univ. NO 8-7942
The Famous U of M
~JAZZ
BAND

r-

U I
II I
TONIGHT at 7 and 9 P.M.
I I
I FIRST ANN ARBOR SHOWING
I I
U U
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gI
I I
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(962)
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The orig inal unc ut ve rsion
II

4

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ice

S entencing Set for Tuesday

(Continued from Page 1)
restrict his testimony only to the
specific incident at .the draft
board, when the/ju y returned.
Defense Witness
Only one defense witness, Uni-
versity Director of Student Or-
ganizations, J. DuItcan Sells was
allowed to testify as to the char-
acter of the protestors.
Over the objections of the prose-
cutor, Sells testified on the char-
acter of four defendants. "Their
reputation insofar as my experi-
ence with them is excellent," said
Sells.-
Earlier Goodman had called
Rev. J. Daniel Burke, Episcopal
chaplain at the University. Burke
testified that he had met with
city administrator Guy Larcom Jr.
and others the day before the
demonstration.
Burke explained that the city
officials knew the details of the
demonstration. Delhey objected
that arrangements made before-
ORGANIZATION
NOTICES
USE OF THIS COLUMN FOR AN-
NOUNCEMENTS is available to official-
ly recognized and registered student
organizations only. Forms are available
in Room 1011 SAB.
Gamma Delta, University Lutheran
Chapel, 1511 Washtenaw, work holiday,
in the inner city of Detroit, Riverside
Lutheran Church, Sat., Jan. 29. Meet
in Chapel at 12:30 p.m. Return at 7
or 8 p.m. Supper in Detroit.
Alpha Phi Omega, Pledge meeting,
Jan. 30, 4 p.m., APO office, 2528 SAB.
Newman Student Association, In-
ternational Bible service for peace
and unity, Sun., Jan. 30, 3 p.m., St.
Mary's Chapel. First of its kind in -the
Washtenaw County area.
Folk Dance Club (WAA), Intermedi-
ate Folk Dancing, every Mon., 8:30-
10:30 p.m., Women's Athletic Bldg.
* * *
U. of M. Student Religious Liberals,
Discussion, Sun., Jan. 30, with Dr.
Bardach, School of Nat. Res., 7 p.m.,
Unitarian Church, on "Why Cambodia
Is Neutral." Rides at 6:45 p.m. at north
entrance to Union & at Mary Markley
Dorm.
Guild House, The Roost, Jan. 29, 7-
1:30 a.m., 802 Monroe.

hand with civic officials could not
be made binding on the prosecu-
tor's office.
Delhey's,- objection was upheld.
Breakey said, "Any agreement
made with Larcom does not oper-
ate as a posible element of con-
donation."
The sentencing )f five other
demonstrators who pled guilty
earlier is set for Feb. 3. No trial
date has been set in the case of
Ronald Miller, '68, who recently
changed his plea to not guilty.
Across
Campus
SATURDAY, JAN. 29
2:30 and 8 p.m.-PTP presents
ACT in Moliere's "Tartuffe" at
Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre.
7 and 9 p.m. - Cinema Guild
presents Antonioni's "Eclipse" in
the Architecture Aud.

UA(
Symposium
Feb. 1, 3-5

Next Friday Night
FREE
H ILL

IN THE ARCITECTURE AUDITORIM
I ADM ISION1 FIFTY CENT
EI
& E~ VL~ I9,~~L~ WkY
U= = = = . = = = = = = = = = = = = = = . = = = .

i

1

Join The Daily Business Staff

I

iii'

MOm

UAC's

"a"COMEDY HAS A NEW FREEDOM!
It swells with joy, zest, delight in the
world! A great filmI Moviegoers can re-
joice now!" -Newsweek Magazine
i{k
FAINFESTIVAL
RlIT11511111140M
RAYBROOKS MICHAEL CRAWFORD DONALDONNELLY
Today DIAL j
8-6416
NEXT: "THE LOVED ONE"

Ul

MUSKET '66
presents
WEST
SIDE.
STORY
February 9-10-11-12
Mendelssohn Theatre
BLOCK TICKETS Jan. 31
INDIVIDUAL TICKETS Feb. 1-12
TICKETS AVAILABLE
MUSKET offices
MICHIGAN LEAGUE
PERFORMANCES:

4

3

DIAL 662-6264
1)ORIS 1)iY
ROD rJ'AYJL9Ij

SHOWN AT 1:00-3:00
5:00-7:00 & 9:00

l-

JI

,:
.:.
.:.
.:
.;

4r
a

[G. thC ntury.

3RD WEEK
Direct from its
Roadshow Engagement

1)0NOTniMsrruitij
FEB. 16 & 17th
1T0H ELLO"

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NO SEATS RESERVED
Shows at 1:15-3:50-6:30-9:00
Mats. $1.25; Eves. & Sun. $1.50

Wed.
Thurs.
Fri.
Sat.

8:30
8:30
7:00
10:00
2:30
8:30

P.M.
P.M.
P.M.
P.M.
P.M.
P.M.

-TE CINE41MA OUILD
IN THE ARCHITECTURE AUOITORIUM
FILM DISCUSSION
Eclipse, The Drunken Angel

*

$2.00
$2.50
$2.50
$2.50
$2.00
$2.50

$Oth C~ttheir

*Late per: 2:00 A.M.

0

TODAY AT 2:*30 & 8:00 P.M.

(OAJR BY OE ILE

STARTING FRIDAY, FEB. 4th
"MY FAIR LADY"

Guild House, Art -Fair, Jan. 28, 29
30, 802 Monroe.

&

PTP
PROFESSIONAL THEATRE
PROGRAM

/1e4 en t4

A.C.T.

La Sociedad Hispanica, El Senor Ben
Lanford, hablara sobre "El indio amer-
icano," lunes 3 p.m., 3050 Frieze Bldg.
Vengan todos, *.
ULLR Ski Club, Film & talk by Hugo
Bohm of Boyne Mt., plans for week-
end trip to Boyne. Tues., Feb. 1, 8
p.m., Union Room 3B.
KKY (Psi) Honorary Band Fraternity,
Wind instrument recital (students),
Jan. 30, 8:30 p.m., Recital Hall, School
of Music
483-4680
drntwa OwCARPENTER ROAD
FREE IN-CAR HEATERS
TONIGHT THRU SUNDAY

Sunday, Jan. 30

9-11 P.M

AMERICAN CONSERVATORY
THEATRE

101 ARCHITECTURE BUILDING
(Next to auditorium)

IN

i
l

11

IQC & ASSEMBLY PRESENT
BIL COSBY
and the Modern Folk Quartet

"A madly whirling carnival of mirth"-
"Shimmering and immensely
appealing display of style
. . .thundering success!"
Sf--Pittsburgh Daily-Dispatch
"Stunningly recreated N.Y. hit!"
-Pittsburgh Post-Gazette

SAT., FEB. 5th

8:30 P.M.

HILL AUDITORIUM

A

- rvi-i -~~~4~.

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