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January 20, 1966 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1966-01-20

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

PAGE TWO

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

THURSDAY, JANUARY 20,1960'

PAGE TWO THE MICHIGAN DAILY THURSDAY. JANUARY 20. 19CC

_. n .,.. ...... ...... ........... ...... .. .,..... .....a ., ..

Real Measure of Affluence

$DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

Is How Much "Junk"

Prof. Ross J. Wilhelm of the1
graduate school of business ad-
ministration said yesterday that
a real measure of how affluent
our. society has become is the1
growing market for used personal'
items such as china, glassware,'
rugs or utensiles. Sales and prices
of used merchandise are increas-
ing all the time, and persons fromi
all income levels are both sellingi
and buying used products.
"While we have always had such
things as rummage sales and
church bazaars, the sale of used{
merchandise today is being taken
over by professionals," Wilhelm
added.
The first of three general
methods being used to dispose of
used merchandise is the establish-
ment in some larger cities of new
thieves or flea markets.
Wilhelm said that congested
streets and highly efficient retail
stores have contributed to the de-
cline of the traditional municipal
or farmers markets in many cities,

but at the same time open markets
specializing in the sale of used
merchandise are growing.
"Traditionally Maxwell St. in
Chicago and Delancey St, in New
York and other such open markets
have served as discount centers
for lower income neighborhoods.
But in recent years the customers
attending such markets include
many upper income people, and
the merchandise being offered is
of higher quality," he said.
Wilhelm noted that in New York
City a bona fide flea market was
established recently for hunters
of used bargains. Held Sunday
afternoons in the spring and fall
on a Manhattan parking lot, with
a 75 cent admision charge, the
market and its average of 100
vendors attracts as many as 6,000
customers on a good day. Most of
the vendors are antique dealers.
Another method is the estab-,
lishment of second-hand mer-
chandise stores designed to cater
to the higher rather than lower

ISold
income groups. These new private
shops are joining Goodwill Indus-
tries and the Salvation Army in
merchandising used goods. Some
of the shops sell merchandise
consigned to them by sellers,
while others buy from individuals
to sell on their own.
Also owners organize private
sales of their goods on their own
premises - usually by having a
garage sale. Garage sales are be-
ing held by individuals in cities
all over the country, often by peo-
ple who are getting ready to move,
Wilhelm explained.
The buyers at garage sales, like
those at the flea markets, include
a large number. of antique col-
lectors as well as people who want
to furnish a summer cottage or
just pick up a bargain. Typically
the person holding the sale ac-
cumulates his merchandise in his
garage, puts low prices on the
items, advertises the time of the
sale and then prays it doesn't rain.

The Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publication of the Univer-
sity of Michigan, for which The
Michigan Daily assumes no editor-
ial responsibility. Notices should be
sent in TYPEWRITTEN form to
Room 3519 Administration Bldg. be-
fore 2 p.m. of the day preceding
publication, and by 2 p.m. Friday
for Saturday and Sunday. General
Notices may be published a maxi-
mum of two times on request; Day
Calendar items appear once only.
Student organization notices are not
accepted for publication.
THURSDAY, JANUARY 20
Day Calendar
Management Development Seminar -
"Disciplinary Process and Grievance
Handling": University Medical Center,
8:30 a.m.
Mental Health Research Institute
Seminar-Monica Blumenthal, MHRI
and Department of Psychology. "Men-
tal Health in Persons Heterozygous for
Phenylketonuria": 1957 MHRI, 2:15
p.m.
Cinema Guild - William Wellman's
"Public Enemy": Architecture Aud., 7
and 9 p.m.
Professional Theatre Program Per-
formance-American Conservatory The -
atre Company in Edward Albee's "Tiny
Alice": Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre, 8
p.m.
University Musical Society Choral
Union Concert-Phyllis Curtin, sopra-
no: Hill Aud., 8:30 p.m.
Lecture - Prof. J. W. Harbaugh of
Stanford Univ. will speak to the Geol-
ogy-Mineralogy Journal Club on the
subject: "Computer Simulation as an
Experimental Tool in Geology and Pal-
eontology": Thurs., Jan. 20, at 4 p.m.
in 2054 Natural Science Bldg.
General Notices
Doctoral Examination for Allen Jay
Grenberger, History; thesis: "The Brit-
ish Image of India 1880-1960: A Study
in the Literature of Imperialism,"
Thurs., Jan .20, 3609 Haven Hall, 2:30
p.m. Chairman, G. S. Brown.
Engineering Placement Me e tin g:
"Success on the Job." Common diffi-
culties of transition from school to
work and how to avoid them. Prof.
J. G. Young, Jan. 21, 4 p.m., 311 West
Engineering Bldg.,

ing of the Graduate Faculty of the
University of Michigan will be held
Wed., Jan. 26, at 4 p.m. in Aud. A,
Angell Hall. The agenda will consist
of two elements:
1) Introductory remarks by the dean
concerning recent developments in
Graduate School administration, ad-
missions procedures, fellowship decen-
tralization, and review of foreign lan-
guage requirements; and
2) General discussion by the Gradu-
ate Faculty.
The Michigan Memorial-Phoenix Proj-
ect invites requests for faculty research
grants to support research within the
scope of the term "peaceful uses of
nuclear energy." The Project is par-
ticularly interested in studies concerned
with: Biological Effects of Radiation,
Radiation Dosimetry, New Uses of Iso-
topes, New Tracer Techniques, Direct
Conversion of Nuclear Energy to Elec-
trical Energy, The Fusion Process, Plas-
mas as Related to Controlled Fusion,
Radiation Chemistry, Nuclear Weapons
Proliferation and Disarmament, Psy-
chological Attitudes Toward Nuclear
Energy Hazards, Evaluation of Hazards
to Urban Populations from Nuclear
Activities, and Economic Studies of
Nuclear Activities Including Power Pro-
duction. The Project will not support
work whose only relation to nuclear,
energy is a routine use of isotope
tracer techniques.
Requests for grants of $3000 or less
are most appropriate. Grants may cov-
er equipment, supplies, research assist-
ance, and field trips. Applications for
these grants should be returned to
the Phoenix Project by Mon., Jan. 31,
1966. Grants will be made by April 1.

Application blanks may be obtained
from the office of the Phoenix Proj-
ect at the Phoenix Memorial Labora-
tory on the North Campus or by call-
ing 764-6213.
Special Education Colloquium Series:
Speakers: James Moss, PhD, and Tony
Milazzo, EdD, both from the U.S. Of-
fice of Education, Dashington, D.C.
2-4 p.m., Room 4002 UHS-Informal
discussion with selected staff and grad-
uate students.
7:30-9:30 p.m., Aud. A, Angell Hall-
Implications of federal training and
research programs in special education.
Student Government Council Approval
of the following student-sponsored
events becomes effective 24 hours after
the publication of this notice. All
publicity for these events must be
withheld until the approval has become
effective.
Approval request forms for student
sponsored events are available in Room
1011 of the SAB.
Galen's Honorary Medical Society.
Annual lectureship, Feb. 9, Medical Sci-
ence Bldg., 8 p.m.
.Placement
POSITION OPENINGS:
Mobil Chemical Co., Macedon, N.Y.
-Various openings including 1. Prod-
uct Manager, BS, top third of class,
MBA, 1 yr. sales exper. 2. Mech. De-
signer. BSME desirable, 3 yrs. machine
des. exper. 3. Electrical designer, BSEE
plus 3 yrs. elect. des. exper.
National Cash Register Co., Dayton,
Ohio-Programmed Instruction Writ-
ers. Men & women, degree in Psych.,
Educ. or English. No exper. req. Dev.,

write & test trng. courses.
State Univ. of New York at Buffalo,
Buffalo. N.Y.-Admin. Ass't. for radio
& TV programming liaison. Secretarial
skills, knowl. of radio, TV & film
prod. and writing ability. Coordinate
factors for film prod. schedule.
Saginaw General Hospital, Saginaw,
Mich.-Various openings including Med.
Tech., ASCP; Therapeutic iDetitiau,
Regist. Physical Therapist, Nurse An-
esthetist, O.R. Supv.
Trans-Metals, Muskegon, Mich. --
Chemist. Woman grad, BS Chem., no
exper.req. Do analytical Chem. for
company specializing in additives for
nose cones of space missiles.
Bureau of Commercial Fisheries,
Ketchikan, Alaska-Chemist. Degree in!
physical or lice sci. or engrg. 30 hrs.!
chem. req. 1 yr. exper. or grad study.
Dyna Corp., Dayton, Ohio-Indust.
Engr. BS plus 2-3 yrs. exper. to be-
come chief indust. engr. Recent grad.
Edsel Ford Institute for Med. Res.,
Detroit-Physicist or Chemist. BS, some
physics trng. No exper. req. Prepare
radioactive sources & res. in absorp-
tiometry & X-ray diffraction in radio-
active isotope lab.
For further information, please call
764-7460, General Div., Bureau of Ap-
pointments, 3200 SAB.
SUMMER PLACEMENT SERVICE:
212 SAB-
Camp Tamarack, Artonville, Mich.-
Will interview on Jan. 25, counselors,
specialists in arts & crafts, kitchen
manager & ass'ts. eDtails and appli-

cations at 212 SAB.
ENGINEERING PLACEMENT INTER-
VIEWS-Seniors & grad students, please
sign schedule posted at 128-H West
Engrg.
MON.-FRI., JAN. 24-28-~
, General Motors Corp., All Dlvs.-
Counseling interviews -AnyDegree:
ChE, EE. EM., IE, Mat'ls., ME. MS:
Comm. Sci., Info. & Controls. BS-MS:
Met. BS: E Math, Sci. Engrg. R. & D.,
Des., Prod., Sales, Programming.
TUES., JAN. 25-
California Texas oil Corp., N.Y.C.,
Europe. Asia, Africa & Australia-BS..
NMS: ChE, ME. Will refer non-citizens
to affiliate company in home country.
Dev., Des.. Process, Construction.
The Falk Corp., Milw aukee - BS: IE.
BS-MS: ME. R. & D., Des., Prod., Sales,
Computer Programming.
Hercules Powder Co., Allegany Bal-
listics Lab., Cumberland, Md. - MS-
PhD: Aero., ChE, EM, Mat'ls., ME.
Prof.: Applied Mech. R. & D.
Lockheed-Georgia Co., Atlanta, Ga.-
Any Degree: Aero., CE. EM, ME, Met.,
Physics-(Dynamics-Mech.). R. & D.,
Des., Prod.
Perfect Circle, Div. of Dana Corp.,
Hagerstown-Richmond, Ind., -BS: EM,
IE, ME, Met. BA: Personnel Mgmt.,
Ind. Relations. Men only. R. & D.,
Des., Prod.
Rexall Chemical Co., Paramus, N.J.,
Odessa, Tex., Los Angeles, Calif.-BS-
MS: ChE, ME. R. & D., Prod., Sales.
R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Co., Win-
ston-Salem, N.C.-BS-MS: ChE, EE,
ME. BS: CE, IE. Men only. Dev., Des.

4
4

BOOKSTORE:
Text of Letter to Vice-President Cutler

Professonal Theatre Program
presents
the National Tou
ISIINRIED
qISECE ED

Dear Dr. Cutler:
We are writing this letter to
express our disappointment and
dissatisfaction with your office.
We are making the letter public
as an explanation to the thirteen
thousand students on this campus
who 'signed their names to a
petition demanding a University
Discount Bookstore. Not an ex-
planation as to why there will be
none;' but an explanation as to
why students were ignored in the
final most crucial portion of the
bookstore campaign.
It has been our belief that the
University must commit itself to
the students' economic welfare
when that welfare co-
incides with their educational
belief, we have presented a pro-
posal for a University discount
bookstore. It was in our estimation
a feasible proposal-one step in
lowering educational costs. We still
maintain this position in spite of
the fact that it will not become a
reality. We have tried, and have
considered our activities meaning-
ful. Now we are not so sure.
When you addressed Student
Government Council last Septem-
ber, you; assured us that, your
office would do all it could to
further responsible student de-
sires. You also stressed the need
for visible student support on any
demand. But most important, you
pledged you cooperation with us
in attaining these goals. We were
responsible. We demonstrated stu-
dent support. We got you 13,000
signatures and waited for this
cooperation. It never came-for
you have all but ignored us. You
didn't ignore the proposal; that
isn't our complaint. You ignored
us! Eight weeks ago you promised
that when you reached a decision
as to the bookstore matter you
would notify us. You never did.

The first we heard of the decision
was from a news leak in the
Michigan Daily. Yes, we were fin-
ally allowed to see you-two days
before the Regents' meeting, when
decisions had already been ce-
mented.
You have done much in the
past on students' behalf and we
dislike criticizing you. But this
criticism is justified. We cannot
pass off your lack of cooperation
as a mere mistake or oversight:
the matter is too important. It
concerns the whole issue of the
relevancy and meaning of our past
(and future) activities.
We are now faced with the
question: when we, as students,
want something done on an
official level at this university,
should we come to you (as we
have done in the past), or should
we instead scream a little louder
so that even those in the salmon-
colored building across the street
can hear? It is an important ques-
tion, and not necessarily a per-
sonal one. It involves the issue
of whether to work within the
system or without. Can we, by
working through your office, ever
achieve our goals or are you only
one small and unimportant cog in
the massive flywheel of the Uni-
versity? You have repeatedly as-
serted that it is your purpose to
make the Vice-Presidency for
Student Affairs a major vice-
presidency, ranking along side the
other major vice-presidents. We
feel that in the bookstore issue at
least, you have not followed your
words with appropriate actions.
The problems lies in first de-
fining the purpose of the Office
of Student Affairs. It is our feel-
ing that its purpose should con-
cern itself with giving the student
a voice in the policy-making pro-
cess. If you neglect that purpose

by failing to work closely with
students in matters which directly
concern them, then you have failed
in your main purpose. Further,
and more important, if students
lose confidence in you, and de-
cide it pointless to even consult
you on any matters of importance
to 'the general University com-
munity, then you have in effect
not only ceased to function in
your post, but have also reduced
the Vice-Presidency for Student
Affairs to a position of super-
fluity.
'We repeat: our complaint is not
with your position on the book-
store (Although we do not agree
with it). Our dissatisfaction in-
volves a far more basic issue; that
of giving students a role in the
decision-making process. Our dis-
appointment is with your apparent
lack of concern over the import-
ance of discussing with students
problems which greatly affect
them. Inherent in this, is our
feeling that both you and we would
have profited by an exchange of
ideas before your decision had
been made. We expect no less.
SGC Bookstore Committee
Ruth Bauman
Paula Cameron
Stephen Daniels
Mickey Eisenberg
Don Resnick
Ed Robinson
Steve Schwartz
Shows at 1:30-4:00-6:30 & 9:05
Weekday Matinee-$1.25
Evenings & Sunday-$1.50
IF YOU HAVE ONLY SEEN
IT ONCE, YOU HAVEN'T
SEEN IT AT ALL
THE BIGGEST BOND
4.4L.OF ALL!

ORGANIZATION NOTICES
.- 24:-:;:::.:. {-:- : .: : ":.-:- :{:-:-

USE OF THIS COLUMN FOR AN-
NOUNCEMENTS is available to officially
recognized and registered student or-
ganizations only. Organizations who are
planning to be active for the Spring
Term must be registered in the Office
of Student Organizations by Jan.27.
1966. Forms are available in Room 1011
SAB.
* * *
Folk Dance Club (WAA), Folk dance
with instruction every Friday, 8-11 p.m.,
Barbour Gym.

p.m., International Center Recreation
Room.
The Christian Science Organization,
Thursday evening meeting, 7:30 p.m.,
3545 SAB..
Newman Student Association, Thurs.,
Jan. 20, 7 p.m., Introduction to Ecu-
menical Dialogue Group. Topic: "19th
Century Problems of Christian Unity."
Speaker: Fr. Ray Betanzos. Presbyter-
ian Center, Washtenaw Ave.
* m *
Newman Student Association, Com-
munity mass and supper, 5 p.m., Fire-
side Chat, 8 p.m. Topic: "God Is Dead
- Discussion of Personal Unbelief,"
speaker, Fr. Ennen, S.J.

IRA WALLACH
,HRUTHMcDEVITI J
830 P.M.H

2i
IL.L AUDITORIUM

4
I.

I Delta PhiEpsion, Open rush meet
Graduate Faculty: The annual meet- ing. Speaker, Prof. Barlow, Jan. 20, 7:30

HILL AUDITORIUM BOX OFFICE OPEN
THURSDAY & FRI DAY, 10-5

MICIGA
rev. E~~d&

2ND WEEK
Direct from its
Roadshow Engagement

NO SEATS RESERVED
Shows at 1:15-3:50-6:30-9:00
Mats. $1.25; Eves. & Sun. $1.50
10lth Can"-Fat
presents
$ee*A4'4

PTP p/'eeht4 A.C.T.

LATE, LATE
SHOW!

'11 P.M.

COLOR BY PE UXE
CINEMASCOPE

Fri. and Sat. Nights
JAN. 21-22

..- -- --------------- mmmmmmmmmmmimim ------- -
1 #
# WilJam agey mn'
TONGHa a Blnd9P.M
1 /
aI
/ E
1 /
/ I
E /
E
1 E
starring
James Cagney
Jean Harlow
f ,
/ f
f ,
Short: "Blind Gary Davis"
E ,
E I
1 I
1 ,
I /
IN THE ARCHITECTURE AUDITORIUM
/
/ AOM ISS ION: FI FTY C ENTS
E #
imr mm m m m m m m m m m m m m m mmmmmmmmmmmmm

I

4

Mendelsi
Theat
All Seats

A Zany
New Version

soh n
ire
$2.50

AiLB[R RBRODOU HlARR ku
BRlIE CONNER!
nTUNDERBALL"
wNM EO PANAVISION
QE I OL UNITED ARTISTS

I

i

TODAY AT 8:00 P.M.

PTP
PROFESSIONAL THEATRE
PROGRAM

reeeh t

A.C.T.
AMERICAN CONSERVATORY
THEATRE

i

I

m

4 k ZZLES!
Director Richard Lester has up and
done it again. . , with a camera that
whizzes like a slap-stick in thehands
of an old burlesque clown, he whips
through this neo-Keystonesbusiness,
flashing sight gags and fast throw-
away lines. A wild and candid spoof of
masculine sex drives!"
COMEDY HAS A NEW FREEDOM!
It swells 'with joy, zest, delight in the
world! A great film! Moviegoers can re-
joiceflow!" -Newsweek Magazine
.K~.

WOULD YOU LIKE TO READ
1000 to 2000 WORDS A MINUTE'
WITH FULL COMPREHENSION & RETENTION
EASE PRESSURE - SAVE TIME - IMPROVE CONCENTRATION

IN

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You can read 150-200 pages an hour using the ACCELERATED READING method.
You'll learn to comprehend at speeds of 1,000 to 2,000 words a minute. And retention is
excellent.
This is NOT a skimming method; you definitely read every word.
You can apply the ACCELERATED READING method to textbooks and factual mate-
rial as well as to literature and fiction. The author's style is not lost when you read at these
speeds. In fact, your accuracy and enjoyment in reading will be increased.
Consider what this new reading ability will enable you to accomplish-in your required
reading and in the additional reading you want to do.
No machines, projectors, or apparatus are used in learning the ACCELERATED READ-
ING method. Thus the reader avoids developing any dependence upon external equipment in
reading.
An afternoon class and an evening class in ACCELERATED READING will be taught
each TUESDAY adjacent to the U. of M. campus, beginning on February 15.
Be our guest at a 30-minute public DEMONSTRATION of the ACCELERATED READ-

"Tantalizing.
"Stunning !"

-N.Y. Times
-N.Y. Post

"Wildly imaginative!"
-Saturday Review
"Electric excitement!"
-Pittsburgh Press

11

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