100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

January 19, 1966 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1966-01-19

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.


WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 19, 1966

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE SEVEN

WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 19, 1906 THE MICHIGAN DAILY PAGE SEiTEN

Michigan,

By HOWARD KOHN
Just what are the agrarian-
lovers of Michigan's famed agri-
cultural college producing in their
East Lansing experimental barn-
sheds?
Hybrid athletes?
It's either that or Duffy
Daugher y and John Benington
have the closest alliance to Olym-
pus since the Greeks invented
sports.
After defying the unfriendly
prognostications of the football
critics and capturing the Big Ten
gridiron title last fall, Michigan
State is now causing looks of sur-
prise and consternation around
the conference cage circle. The
Jolly Green "Giants have non-
chalantly walked off with three
consecutive Big Ten wins and are,
tied for first with defending
champion Michigan.
Just How Good?
How good are the Spartans and
how long will their state of grace
last?
"State is no flash in the pan;"

said Michigan freshman coach
Tom Jorgensen bluntly. "They1
were among my preseason selec-]
tions for title contenders, and I'm
not surprised by their perform-
ance.,w
"Sophomore Matthew Aitch and
John Baily have come through to
go along with their returning
corps of Bill Curtis and Stan
Washington," explained Jorgensen.
"Washington especially has
changed from a talented but erra-
tic player into a consistent high
scorer and team leader."
Coming to Michigan State un-
der the dismal shadow of a 1-13
conference record last year, for-
mer Drake mentor Benington has
been amazed by his team's surge
to the top.
Consistent
"Our consistency off the back-
boards and our shooting per-
formance from the floor is a very
pleasant shock," gushed a happy
Benington after Baily's 24 points
led MSU to victory over Ohio
State last Saturday.
Benington's attitude today is a

MSU
far cry from last fall's pessimistic,
though seemingly rational, out-
look. "I don't see how we can be
a conference championship fac-
tor," predicted the new coach
when he saw his charges in prac-
tice then. "But I do think we can
surprise somebody this winter."
And so they have, following the
Duffy-blazed Good Luck trail.
Meanwhile, in Iowa City, the
Hawkeyes are also stuck in the
throes of a jinx that began when
their offensive football line col-
lapsed last fall and is continuing
on the hardcourt. "Hardluck
Iowa" is the forlorn moan that
echoed from Indiana to Iowa last
night after the Hawkeyes lost
their second Big Ten tilt to the
upset-minded Hoosiers. r
Hawkeyes Falter
Rated by experts' before the
season as a definite threat for
championship honors, Iowa is now
buried in the second division with
a 1-2 mark.
"Iowa muffed an excellent op-
portunity for a fast start," com-
mented Jorgenson. "They had two
relatively easy road engagements
and lost both of them."
Wounded and desperate, the
Hawkeyes return home to face
none other than Benington and
crew this Saturday.
"It's a do or die situation for
them," said Jorgensen. "They
can't afford another loss so early
in the season."
One at a Time
Benington has a set policy of
"playing teams one at a time,"
but it's no secret that he'd enjoy
a big triumph over the Iowans
who twice trounced MSU last
campaign.

Eye

Big

Ten

Cage

Title

While Iowa waits and ponders,
two other Big Ten contenders are
drilling in earnest for a crucial:
clash at Yost Fieldhouse. Michigani
and Minnesota meet Saturday in
a battle of Hudson vs. Russell,
challenger vs. champion and pride
vs. pride.
"Although I won't say the game
will decide the championship, it
will be extremely important for
both teams," emphasized Minne-
sota coach John Kundia.
Saturday's match will mark the
last meeting between the two "M
for Mighty" quintets in the Rus-
sell-Hudson era. Michigan has
won three out of four since Cazzie
moved into a starting slot three
years ago, and the Gophers are'
smarting for revenge.
The Wolverines won the cham-
pionship both years while Min-
nesota ended up third and second.
Currently, Cazzie and Co. are tied
for the top spot with the Spartans
at 3-0, while Minnesota is in
fourth with an even 1-1 record.
Michigan State stunned the
Hudson-less Gophers in their
opener, but Hudson came back to
direct his teammates to a con-
quest of Indianalast weekend.

Lou Hudson, the "Mr. Every- injury to his wrist on Dec. 18
thing" man who was third in the sent Gopher title hopes plum-
Big Ten scoring race last year, is meting. But all was not lost, and
to the Minnesota Gophers what the 6'5" senior returned to the
12 inches is to a foot. His untimely lineup with a two-pound plaster
AP POLL:
DukeBarely First
--K entuckoses In

cast extending from fingers to
elbow against the Hoosiers.
"His quick moves and innate
ability compensated for the in-
jury," explained Jorgensen who
scouted the game for the Wol-
verines. "He didn't try any jump
shots, but his left-handed layups
were devastating."
Watson Praises Hudson
Indiana coach Lou Watson was
even more effusive in his praise
of the one-armed bandit, "I don't
know whether there is another
player in the country who could
have done what I saw Hudson do.
I don't think Michigan has any-
body who can take Hudson and
stop him, one handed or not."
Hudson is teaming up with team
captain Archie Clark who "came
into his own while Hudson was

Caging the Cats'

i

Kentucky's unbeaten and ag-I
gressive Wildcats are making
steady strides towards the -top of
the Associated Press college poll.
With their impressive win over
previously third ranked Vander-
bilt 98-83 last Saturday, Baron
Adolph Rupp's Bluegrass bombers
have climbed to within three
points of first ranked Duke.
Duke, riding a 12-game winning
streak after losing to South Caro-
lina, clings to first place with 338
points. The Blue Devils collected
24 first place votes while Kentucky
posted 17. Duke, which has been
first for six weeks since their
double victory over UCLA, is slow-
ly losing its first place margin.
Following the Blue Devils and
Wildcats are St. Joseph's of Phila-
delphia, Providence and Vander-
bilt which slipped to fifth after
losing to Kentucky.
Kansas made the greatest gains
of the week, jumping to sixth on
the AP poll. Bradley follows clear-
ly in seventh with a 14-2 record.
Unbeaten Texas Western (12-0)

is eighth and Loyola of Chicago,
now 12-1, moved into the top ten
as the No. 9 team.
UCLA, the erratic defending
national champs, lost to upset
minded Stanford and slipped to
the bottom of the top,ten with a
10-4 record.
While not being reinstated in
the top ten, Michigan's Wolver-
ines received votes along with two
other Big Ten teams, Michigan
State and Iowa.
Four of the top teams, includ-
ing both Duke and Kentucky, are
idle this week because of semester
examinations.
The Top Ten, with first-place
votes in parentheses, won-lost rec-
ords through games of Saturday,
Jan. 15, and total points:
Team Points
1. Duke (24) (14-1) 338
3. Kentucky (17) (12-0) 335
3. St. Joseph's (11-2) 323
4. Providence (12-i) 231
5. Vanderbilt (14-2) 212
6. Kansas (13-2). 168
7. Bradley (14-2) 160
8. Texas Western (12-.0) 134
9. Chicago Loyola (12-1) 43
10. UCLA (10-4) 31

r

MICHIGAN
Michigan State
Illinois
Minnesota
Iowa
Northwestern
Wisconsin
Purdue
Indiana
Ohio State

W
3
3
3
1
1
1
1
1
1
0

L
0
0
1
1
2
2
2
2
3
2

Pet.
1.000
1.000
.750
.500
.333
.333
.333
.333
.250
.000

out of the lineup" according to
Jorgenson.
Michigan will counter with a
hetereogenous five which has pro-
duced three thrilling victories.
Northwestern tangles with Ohio
State in the other weekend con-
test, while four Big Ten teams-
Illinois, Indiana, Purdue and Wis-
consin-beat a hasty retreat to
the books for semester exams.
Illini Scramble
Illinois, with a 3-1 mark, is the
only other prominent threat in
the scrambled Big Ten race. "The
conference is well balanced this
year, admitted Jorgensen. "It
isn't as tough as last year, but
the 1965 squads were. . . excep-
tionally rugged."
Commenting on the number of
losses the 1966 champion could
incur, Jorgensen replied, "It would
take a magician to predict that,
but I do think it will be difficult
for any team to go undefeated.
There are always those 'easy'
games which suddenly turn into
disasters, in addition to the 'rough'
encounters."
If, by chance, both Michigan
and Michigan State should survive
the battle of the fittest and win
their initial 13 league games, the
two schools would meet in a show-
down in the season finale at East
Lansing.

Big Ten Standings

1

-Daily-Jim Graff
OLIVER DARDEN, MICHIGAN'S BIG "0," scores two of Michi-
gan's 93 points against Northwestern Saturday night. This
partcular Darden effort is 'a semi-hook pushed over the out-
stretched arms of Northwestern's 6'8" center, Jim Pitts.

f

College Basketball
Clemson 70, The Citadel 61
Bethany 62, Wheeling 52
Indiana Central 80, Hanover 67
Florida 74, Florida State 65
Bluffton 93, Cedarville 78
Wittenberg 70, Heidelberg 60
Salem 98, West Liberty 82
Muskingum 73, Kenyon 70
Greenville 73, Rose Poly 64
Florida A&M 109, Tuskegee Inst. 85
Georgia Southern 66, Stetson 62
Nebraska 83, Kansas 75
Winston Salem St. 94, Morgan St. 79
DePaul 81, Niagara 61
Gallaudet 109, Salisbury (Md) St. 87
Pittsburg (Kan) St. 74, St. Benedicts
(Kan) 62
Texas A&M 64, Texas 57
Eastern Illinois 84, Ball State 75
Furman 78, Wofford 75 (ovt)

Introduction to Ecumenical Dialogue
"Uniting and Devisive Factors
in the 19th Century"
Speaker: Fr. Ray Betauzos

Thurs., Jan. 20

7:00-8:30 P.M.

LOU HUDSON

C

i

Presbyterian Campus Center

New Styles

(First Presbyterian Church

1432 Washtenaw)

First at WILD'S

Sponsored by: Newman Student Association
and Ecumenical Campus Staff

Cam pRus
Interviews
'Lockheed-Qeorgia
Outstanding career opportunities are open at Lockheed.
Georgia for Aerondutical, Civil, Electrical and Mechanical
Engineers. Located only 8 miles from Atlanta, Lockheed.
Georgia offers a unique combination of career opportun-
ity and extra-curricular appeals; convenient resort areas,
major league baseball and football, pleasant year-around
climate, and an opportunity for post-graduato study.
SEE YOUR COLLEGE PLACEMENT DIRECTOR
FOR INTERVIEWS ON
JANUARY25, 1966
LOCKHEED-GEORGIA
A Division of Lockheed Aircraft Corporation
An Equal Opportunity Employer

JANUARY

7

V. __-

i

cord

ooor

OF

FINE SLACKS
BEST QUALITY TROUSERS

Com an

0
1S0

inspiration

Reg. $27.95 Trousers
SALE PRICE

-Daily-Jim Graff

ACCURATE JUMP SHOTS SUCH AS this ten-footer by John
Clawson paved the way to Michigan's come from behind win over
the Wildcats. Defending futilely against the soaring Clawson are
Jim Pitts and Jimmy Burns of NU. Clawson scored 18 points
Saturday.

1

DELTA PHI EPSILON
Men's Professional Foreign Service
Fraternity Announces
OPEN RUSH MEETING
THURSDAY, JAN. 20... 7:30 P.M.
Recreation Room, International Center

Reg. $19.95 Trousers
SALE PRICE

395
$3 50

College graduates, new to Ford Motor Company,
often comment on the comparative youth of many
of our top executives. The example of these men
in key positions is evidence that being young is no
handicap at Ford to those who possess ability and
ambition. In fact, new employes can expect
challenging assignments while still participating
in our College Graduate Program. This means an
opportunity to demonstrate special skills and
initiative while still learning the practical, day-to-
day aspects of the business. Consider the experi-
ence of Jim Weston, who has been with Ford
Motor Company for three years.

Jim Weston
B.A., Washington Univ.
M.B.A., Washington Univ.

Reg. $16.95 Trousers
SALE PRICE

ALL OTHERS. . . .20% OFF
Continuina Our January Sale On

Jim came to Ford in February, 1963. His first assignment was in marketing
analysis where his principal job was evaluating present and potential
dealer locations. For a time, he also gained experience in the actual pur-
chasing of dealer locations. Later, an assignment forecasting sales and
market potential with Ford Division's Truck Sales Programming Depart-
ment gave him the background he needed to qualify for his present position.
His job today? Only three years out of college, Jim is now a senior financial
analyst in Ford Division's Business Management Department.
Jim Weston's experience is not unusual. At Ford Motor Company, your

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan