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August 31, 1965 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1965-08-31

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PAGE _SIX.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

TUESDAY, AUGUST 31,1905'

PAGE SIX THE MICHIGAN DAILY TUESDAY. AUGUST 31. 1965

+ v+ F.e-aw.r s.t +v lnvva vii avyv

,

CMEJREK SIGNS FOR $25,000:
Sophs Earn Starting Jobs Summer Leagues Help

4

The defensive line is supposed
to be the big question mark in
this season's edition of the Michi-
gan football team, but Rocky and
The Chief hope to change all
that.
Rocky is defensive end Roger
Rosema and the Chief is a full-
blooded Indian tackle named Paul,
Johnson.
Head Coach Bump Elliott named
them to the first string yester-
day as the Wolverines began their
second week of practice. Both are
sophomores and they are the only
first year men to crack the start-
ing defensive unit.
Rosema Moves Up
Rosema replaces junior Clayt
Wilhite who had played split of-
fensive end until last spring. The
230-pound Johnson takes over for
senior Chuck Ruzicka.
Ruzicka lettered as a sopho-
more when he played behind all-
Big Ten tackle Tom Keating, but
failed to earn his "M" last sea-
son'.
Bpth Rosema and Johnson were
impressive last spring. Johnson
saw considerable action at defen-
sive tackle while Rosema played
both offensive and defensive end
and won the Maulbetsch Award
for outstanding leadership and
scholarship. Ironically, Wilhite, a
junior, won the same trophy two
years ago.
New Dilemmas
While yesterday's switch couldF
solve some problems, new ones
cropped up at an unexpected place.
The offensive backfield has
been considered the strong point
on the team, but Elliott was
somewhat perturbed by the block-
ing and ball handling of his run-
ners at last Saturday's first full
scrimmage.
The coach did hasten to add
that drills were still in the initial
stage and that iniprovement could
be expected.
Same as Last Year
This observation carries special
weight if one takes a brief flight
back in time. Last year, Elliott
was extreniely upset with the re-
sults of the first scrimmage, but
by the time the season started
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the flaws were certainly missing.
The scrimmage did, however,
produce some pleasant moments
as well.
Halfback Jim Detwiler, who ap-
peared especially fast, and full-
back Dave Fisher, toted up larg&
yardage with regularity.
Ward Recovers
The other half, Carl Ward, ap-
peared to be ending his weight
loss problems as he vigorously
danced into the end zone with a
70-yard punt return.
The battle at quarterback still
appears unresolved as Dick Vid-
mer and Wally Gabler both put
in good performances.
Gabler scored two touchdowns
while Vidmer tossed a 15-yard
scoring pass to split end Craig
Kirby.
In addition to Kirby, Jack Clan-
cy also saw action at split end.
Earlier Elliott had stated that
Clancy would be tried at offen-
sive and defensive end, but if
Rosema makes the grade at de-
fense, Clancy might stick exclu-
sively to catching passes.
A starting halfback two years
ago, Clancy could add the extra
speed needed for the pass receiv-
ing corps.
One casualty in the scrimmage
was reserve center Jesse McClure
who aggravated an old knee in-
jury
ajor LeagUe
11 Slandings <
AMERICAN LEAGUE

Diamondmen Progress

By RICK FEFERMAN I
Plagued by bad weather similar
to that which hampered Mich-
igans gridders in their off-season
practice last spring, Coach Moby
Benedict's diamondmen opened
their fall practice sessions yes-
terday.
Depending upon weather con-
ditions, baseballs should be flying
for six to eight weeks. This is the
eighth consecutive year in which
the diamondmen have engaed in
fall practice, which serves "to
evaluate personnel and to teach
fundamentals," as Coach Benedict
explains it.
It also affords the coaching
staff an opportunity to observe
the progress the players made
while participating in summer
leagues. Though conference rules
forbid scheduling competition with
outside teams, intersquad games
should provide the coaches suffi-
cient insight into the team's
strengths and weaknesses.
Cmejrek Goes Pro
Nine seniors have graduated,
but most of Michigan's starting
lineup has returned. One loss
which will be felt is that of Carl
Cmejrek, the hard hitting right-
fielder who led the Big Ten in
batting last season with a .453
mark. Cmejrek, a sophomore last
year, signed yesterday with the
Baltimore Orioles for a reported
$25,000. He plans to complete this
school year and join the Orioles
next summer.
However, a number of veterans
are returning, a healthy situation
for Coach Benedict, whose Wol-

M nnesota
Chicago
x-Cleveland
Detroit
Baltimore
x-New York
x-Los Angeles
Washington
Boston
x-Kansas City

w
84
76
72
72
70
65
60
58
49
46

L
49
55
57
59
57
66
70
73
83
83

Pct. GB
.632 -
.580 7
.558 10
.551 11
.551 11
.496 18
.458 23
.443 25
.371 34'
.359 351/2

ROCKY ROSEMA

Giants Get Morrall,
Swap Two to Lions

x-Late games not included.
YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
Minnesota 3, Detroit 2 (11 inn)
Cleveland at Kansas City (inc)
New York at Los Angeles (inc)
Only games scheduled
TODAY'S GAMES
Detroit at Minnesota (n)
New York at Los Angeles (n)
Cleveland at Kansas City (n)
Bioston at w,shington (2, t-n)
Chicago at Baltimore (2, t-n)
NATIONAL LEAGUE
W L Pet. GB
L~os Angeles 75 57 .568 -
San Francisco 71 56 .559 1'
Cincinnati 72 57 -.558 1!'/!
Milwaukee 71 58 .550 2?a
Pittsburgh 71 62 .534 4/
Philadelphia 67 62 .519 6
St. Louis 65 67 .492 10
Chicago 63 71 .470 13
Houston 55 75 .423 19
New York 43 88 .328 31/;
YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
No games scheduled
TODAY'S GAMES
Houston at New York (2, t-n)
San Francisco at Philadelphia (2.,t-n)
Los Angeles at Pittsburgh (n)
Milwaukeeat Cincinnati (z, t-n)
St. Louis at Chicago

NEW YORK (AP) - The New
York Giants, whose rebuilding
plans have been stalled by the
lack of an experienced \quarter-
back, obtained 31-year-old Earl
Morrall from the Detroit Lions
yesterday in a three-way deal
which also involved the Cleveland
Browns.
To get Morrall, a 10-year-man
in the National Football League,
the Giants first sent defensive
back Erich Barnes to Cleveland in
exchange for linebacker Mike Luc-
ci and a future draft pick. Then
they traded Lucci and offensive
guard Darrell Dess, plus a draft
choice, to Detroit for Morrall.
Morrall, who was the No. 1
draft choice in the NFL in 1956
after starring at Michigan State,
had played with San Francisco
and Pittsburgh before going to the
Lions. He became expendable this
year when Lion Coach Harry Gil-
mer decided to go along with Milt
Plum as his regular quarterback.
Morrall and Plum alternated
last year until Morrall was hurt
in mid-season, but Gilmer believes
a club can have only one regular
at the position.
The deal immediately recalled
the one that brought Y. A. Tittle
to the Giants from San Fran-
cisco in 1961 to replace Chailey
Conerly. Tittle's passing led New
York to three straight Eastern
Conference championships before
they faded to last place in 1964.
Tittle's retirement at the end
of the 1964 season left the Giants
with only one quarterback who
had any NFL game experience-
sophomore Gary Wood. Henry
Schichtle, another second-year

man, didn't get into a game last
season. The other candidate is
Bob Timberlake, a rookie from
Michigan whose progress has been
hampered by a sore arm.
Coach Allie Sherman of the Gi-
ants emphasized that he didn't
expect the acquisition of Morvall
to solve all the club's problems.
"But it will help speed up our
rebuilding plans," he said. "We
gave up one of the best guards in
the league and one of the top de-
fensive players.
"We have said all along we
would not deal for just another
quarterback. We had considered
the best men avatilable in the
league and Morrall was .one of
them. This wasn't a deal motivated
by last Saturday's game." The Gi-
ants lost 34-13 to Philadelphia in
pre-season game last Saturday.
Last season Morrall completed
50 of 91 passes for 588 yards and
he has a career record of 1,252
attempts and 624 completions for
9,076 yards. in pre-season games,
none of the three Giant quarter-
backs had been able to generate
a strong enough passing threat to
make the running of Sherman's
Baby Bulls effective.
Barnes is in his eighth year in
the NFL and had been with the
Giants for five seasons. The 30-
year-old Dess had been expected
to be a Giant starter at guard
along with- Bookie Bolin. The
25-year-old Lucci is in his fifth
NFL season.
In a separate deal, the Giants
acquired John McDowell, a de-
fensive end, from the Green Ba-s
Packers for a future draft choice.

verines finished second in confer-
ence play last spring. Centerfielder
Dick Schryer, now a junior, bat-
ted .365 for seventh place in the
Big Ten. Schryer, playing for
Pierre in the Basin League this
past summer, finished wth a .279
average, clouting five home runs,
11 doubles, and knocking in 41
runs. Ted Sizemore, also with
Pierre, hit .274, while Michigan
Captain-elect Bob Gilhooley bat-
ted .275 at Winner.
Pitchers Do Well
Two Michigan hurlers, .Bob
Reed and Bill Zepp, also twirled
in the Basin League, which is com-
posed entirely of collegians. Reed,
playing with Sturgis, compiled a
7-5 record. In 105 Innings, he
struck out 131 men, while holding
his ERA to 2.39, fifth best in the
league. Zepp, like Reed a junior,
managed a 3.45 ERA, though his
record was only 0-7.
Lefty Geoff Zahn, a sophomore
this season, played in the Senior
Intercounty Baseball League in
Canada, winning the London Free
Press Trophy. His 1.45 earned run
average topped the league as he
led Stratford to a second place
finish. Zahn was 8-3, striking out
153 men in 105 innings, while al-
lowing only three home runs.
Frosh Football
A freshman football organiza-
tional meeting for all candidates
will be held at 4 p.m. today in
the basement of the Athletic
Administration Bldg. at State
and Hoover Streets. It Is im-
portant that all those interested
attend.
Frosh Track
A meeting for freshman in-
terested in joining the track
squad will be held today at
7:30 p.m. in the basement of
the Athletic Administration
Bldg. It is important that track
prospects attend, says Coach,
Dave Martin.
* * *
I-M Independents
All those interested in or-
ganizing their own intramural
teams for fall sports can attend
a meeting tomorrow at 7:30 p.m.
in the Intramural Bldg. The
meeting applies to managers of
independent teams.
I-M Officials
Anyone interested in becom-
ing a referee for intramural
sports should contact the I-M
Building or attend a special
meeting in the building, at 8
p.m. Thursday. The pay is $1.75
per hour and games will be held
every day beginning Sept. 7.
Casey Quits
After Long
Ball Career
NEW YORK (P)--Seventy-five-
year-old Charles Dillon (Casey)
Stengel, acting on the advice of
his physician, announced his re-
tirement as manager of the New
York Mets yesterday, thus putting
an end to one of the most colorful
careers in the annals of sports.
Old age and a broken left hip,
not yet fully mended, were given
as the reasons for retirement after
I56 years in professional baseball,
25 of them as a manager.
Stengel's retirement will not be-
come effective until the end of the
1965 season. Until then the club
will be run by Wes Westrum, a
Met coach who has been acting as
interim manager of the club since
Stengel fell and fractured his left

hip a month ago.
Stengel will remain with the
club through 1967 as a vice-presi-
dent although his real duties will
be to serve as a scout on the West
Coast. Casey is a resident of
Glendale, Calif., where he plans
to return in a week or so to con-
tipue his recovery.
He was a good smajor league out-
fielder for 14 seasons compiling a
.284 lifetime average and playing
with Brooklyn, Pittsburgh, the
New York Giants, Philadelphia
Phillies and Boston Braves.
His managerial career was high-
lighted by his 12 yearsWith the
Yankees, when he won 10 pen-
nants and seven World Series. He
also managed Brooklyn (1934-36)
and the Boston Braves (1938-43)
and had minor league clubs at
Worcester, T o l e d o, Milwaukee,
Kansas City and Oakland.

9I

4.

MICHIGANENSIAN
Organizational Meeting
Wednesday, Sept. 1-420 Maynard!
7 P.M.
Learn how to petition for a paid
Junior Staff Position
Sign up to work as an Assistant
on your yearbookI
Come and bring your friends!

4f
d4

THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN BANDS PRESENT

HJ

i

11

Al1

I

Auditorium
Friday,
October 1
8:30 p.m.

Seats
Reserved

H

i

I

I

Auditorium

WELCOME
STUDENTS
Hours Open

A

II I

! 1

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