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August 27, 1965 - Image 22

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1965-08-27

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

PAGE SAX;

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

FRIDAY, AUGUST 27, 1965.

1'G SXTE IHGA ALYFIDY uGS 7C16

;,rf

do

I

welcome to Ann Arbor
and
discover
ON-MAIN STREET IN ANN ARBOR

Fund
WASHINGTON R) - 0 n e-
fourth of the school districts in
the 17 Southern and border states
were warned yesterday of a cut-off
of U.S. funds unless they file ac-
ceptable desegregation plans by the
beginning of the next school year.
The White House, reporting
that the other 75 per cent of the
schools have qualified, said no fed-
eral money for any purpose will
go to school districts this fall un-
less they submit compliance plans
satisfactory to the Office of Edu-
cation.
Press Secretary Bill Moyers said
President Lyndon B. Johnson re-
gards the report on compliance as
"heartening and indicating sub-
stantial progress."
Measure of Progress
Johnson's statement, read to
newsmen by Moyers, added: "The
true measure of the progress, how-
ever, cannot be meaningfully

uts May

Aid

U.S. Integration Drive

gauged until the plans are imple-
mented by the school districts
when schools are opened in Sep-
tember."
Moyers said the President has
directed Secretary of Welfare
John W. Gardner to see that the
Office of Education works around
the clock to speed up the proces-
sing of desegregation plans.
He also directed Gardner to no-
tify school districts which have
not yet complied that they must
have acceptable plans in to quali-
fy for federal aid in the fall.
24,820 Plans
Of about 25,000 school districts
throughout the nation eligible for
federal funds, 24,820 have submit-
ted compliance data, Moyers stat-
ed.
Of this total, 23,890 plans have
been accepted and 930 presently
are being processed.
For the South and border states,

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As an added note of welcome-take ad-
vantage of our special offer to you
just present your Student Identification Card
for a 10% reduction on any purchases
on Monday or Friday nights, or all day Sat-
urday-all thru the month of September.

2,723 of the 5,135 school districts
have submitted acceptable deseg-
regation plans.
Another 127 Submitted
Another 127 districts have sub-
mitted court desegregation orders
along with compliance data and
100 of these have been accepted.
Moyers said the reports show
that 80 school districts in the
Southern and border states will
have all 12 elementary and sec-
ondary grades desegregated this
fall, an additional 50 by the fall
of 1966 and 105 more by 1967.
Louisiana is the only Southern
state that has not submitted a de-
segregation plan. Nine districts in
that state have submitted court
orders for desegregation, and all
of them have been accepted.
The Qualifications
Under regulations issued by the
Office of Education and approved
by Johnson, a school district may
qualify for federal funds:
1. When completely desegregat-
ed, by filing with the commissioner
of education an assurance of com-
pliance.
2. When under a final federal
court order, by filing with the
commissioner the court order to-
gether with a compliance report.
3. By submitting an acceptable
plan for the desegregation of a
school.
Universities across the country
also face a cut in federal funds if
it can be proven that they al-
low a discriminatory fraternity
and sorority system to exist on
campus.
Commissioner of Education Fran-
cis Keppel announced earlier this
summer that possible cuts are in
the offing. His remarks grew out
of the controversy over alleged
discriminatory practices by the
Stanford chapter of Sigma Chi.
According to Keppel, the gov-
ernment has a right to withhold
funds under the provisions of the
1964 Civil Rights Act and a code
of the Department of Health, Ed-
ucation and Welfare.

ALASKA

Federal School Money--
How the States Will Share It

CAULF..

Ai /come

Benefits Shown in Accompanying Table

r

SA NW eatures

r

TO ALL OF YOU NEWV
MICHIGAN STUDENTS

Please

make yourself

at home

in the two

Current State
Expenditures for
State Schools
Alabama $ 216,958,000 $
Alaska 38,100,000
Arizona 168,467,000
Arkansas 129,693,000
California 2,250,000,000E
Colorado 212,000,000
Connecticut 305,000,000
Delaware 52,575,000
Florida 465,188,000
Georgia 312,519,000
awaii 64,000,000
Idaho 56,454,000
Illinois 1,032,488,000
Indiana 495,918,000:
Iowa 266,107,000
Kansas 222,500,000
Kentucky 201,026,000
Louisiana 304,000,000
Maine 80,200,000
Maryland '341,559,000
Massadusetts 478,000,000
Mhiga 900,000,000
Minnesota 391,625,000
Mississippi 145;600,000
Missouri , 359,000,000
Monta.. 87,000,000

Estimated Federal
Allotments for Year
Starting July 1, 1965
Percentage
of State
Amount Expenditures.
31,738,000 14.6
1,430,938 3.8
9,757,481 5.8
21,095,002 16.3
73,145,300 3.3
8,454,110 4.0
7,175,172 2.4
1,966,851 3.7
27,896,230 6.0
34,517,871 11.0
2,127,585 3.3
2,311,382 4.1
43,360,809 4.2
18,772,978 3.8
17,325,264 6.5
9,752,736 4.4
28;215;150 14.0
37,904,234 12.5
3,907,197 4.9
14,356,074 4.2
13,988,754 2,9
32,729,320 3.6
20,876,677 5.3,
28,028,704 19.3
26,866,755 7.5
3,750,273 4.3

Nebraska 123,800,000
Nevada 52,425,000
New Hampshire 51,588,000
New Jersey. 706,100,000
New Mexico 119,006,000
New York 2,267,000;000'
North Carolina 353,377,000
North Dakota 58,700,000.
Ohio 978,000,000
Oklahoma 200,000,000
Oregon 234,000,000
Pennsylvania 975,342,000
Rhode Island 70,000,000
South Carolina 167,366,000
South Dakota 69,199,000
Tennessee 245,800,000
Texas 880,000,000
Utah 109,700,000
Vemont 39,852,000
Virginia 341,000,000
Washington 365,000,00
West Virginia 134,000,000
Wisconsin 394,000000
Wyoming 46,000,000
District of Columbia 63,580,000
American Somoo
Guam
Pu.o Ric,04
Virgin Islands
Trust Territory of
the Pacific

6,793,169
&58,184
1,609,796
20,196,092
8,931,560
91,893,253
48,556,000
5,069,610
36,708,699
15,596,196
7,893,807
49,519,506
3,746,500
25,519,125
6,249,152
.31,092,525
74,580,048
2,627,783
1,556,327
29,433,775
11,275,168
15,741,450
16,078,428
1,470,960
4,633,354

5.5
1.3
3.1
2.9
7.5
4.1
13.7
8.6
3.8
7.8
3.4
5.1
5.4
16Z'
9.0
12.6
8.5
2.4
3.9
$.6
3.1
11.7
4.1
3.2
7.3

4

JOHN LEIDY

Shops-and,

good

luck

in Ann Arbor

ANNUAL
STUDENT
RECEPTION

21,201,59 16
$1,060,082,973

JOHN LEIDY
Phone NO 8-6779
601 East Liberty
607 East Liberty

-5 P.M. Sun., Aug 29--
Buffet Supper
& Program
Everyone Invited
No Charge
GRACE BIBLE CHURCH
Corner of State & Huron

Total.

\I.,-

$18,746,116,000

,t

I

f

SYRACUSE iJNIVERSITY FOREIGN

STUDY PROGRAMS
U ~scinIamT7
w N\ 074AT -Q
0V

I

's

SEMESTER IN

How to cope with
an 8 cloc class

ITALY I FRANCE I COLOMBIA
An opportunity to live and study in a foreign
country! You can enrich your education with *a
foreign experience, while completing your normal
four-year undergraduate program. Applicants must
have the endorsement of their home college.
For application forms, write to
FOREIGN STUDY PROGRAM/SYRACUSE UNIVERSITY
335 Comstock Avenue, Syracuse, New York 13210

For RESULTS
Read and Use
Daily Ckiossifieds

*

1) WAKE UP!

i

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4.4 .
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,',. ,L4::
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.,. ='
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:,

2) Splash cold water on your face.

3) Get dressed, of sorts.

#t
.;
>:

4) Take a cup of hot, black coffee and a copy of THE
MICHIGAN DAILY and sit down at your break-
fast table.
5) Read it. Read all the interesting things to do and
international news and the Daily Official Bulletin
(that fabulously witty column by the Adminis-
tration) and Jules Ffeiffer cartoons and the Per-
sonal column.

IF YOU'RE A
]RECORD- COLLECTOR1
BE REASSURED - deal with a nationally known, long established record
shop
FIND AMPLE HELP and guidance in choosing from in evergrowing selec-
tion of record entertainment.
ENJOY SHOPPING where music and artists on records retain their high
intrinsic value.
BE REASSURED in knowing that the pricing is competitive.
FIND A BROAD SELECTION of the best in recorded music.
SO JOIN YOUR FRIENDS - Shop where music on records is our pleasure,
as well as our business.

1

6) Now, don't you feel all bright and cheerful
ready to cope with your 8 o'clock lecture?

and

7) SO GO BACK TO BED!

Put your complexion on its best behavior.

I

Wash up with Velvet Foam.
Non-drying, non-irritating way to get
your face super clean. 2.00. Clear up
blemishes with Disaster Cream. 2.50.
Perk up your complexion with Miss

WAKE UP WITH

1)11 .

11

I

E

IiII

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