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December 03, 1965 - Image 9

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1965-12-03

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

FRIDAY, DECEMBER 3, 1965

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

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FRIDA.ymEEBR3165T. lHCA fATVĀ£~~~

PAGE NINE;

NOT ENOUGH SHOTS:
Vols Strategy Pays Blue Dividends

Falcons' Hopes Rest with Talented Sophomores

By RICK STERN
Tennessee, like neighbor Vander-
bilt six months earlier, was suc-
cessful in forcing Michigan to play
an alien style of ball-and still
lost-
The Vols played a deliberate
offense and forced the Wolverines
to slow down and watch. They
waited for their shots and when
they had them, hit. Unfortunately
they waited too long because the
Wolverines took 65 shots as com-
pared to Tennessee's 45.
This was the crucial statistical
difference. Given 20 extra scoring
opportunities, the Wolverines con-
nected on eight more field goals,
though out shot percentage-wise,
51-46.
Tennessee was the nation's top
defensive team last year and Ray
Mears' o u t f i t was successful
from this standpoint also. Not
since Cazzie Russell was a green
sophomore had Michigan been
held to as low as 71 points in a
basketball game..
Repeatedly the Wolverines were
forced to take a 20 foot shot,
when a cripple would have been
much more pleasing to Mr. Strack
and friends. The Wolverines were
unable to work the ball in for the
better part of the game, due to
the aggressive nature of the Ten-
nessee defense.
Speaking of aggression, Mears,

hailed as the outstanding coach
in the Southeastern Conference,
sported a little of his own after
the game was over. Questioned
about Tennessee's numerous ball
handling errors (traveling and
palming the ball), Mears snorted,
"We don't make those kind of
mistakes and we didn't tonight
either. My ball club is trained not
to make mechanical mistakes and
we don't."
Unless he wasn't watching the
game, Mears' paradoxical remark
would have to be taken as some
sort innuendo regarding the offi-
ciating.
Strack of the Blue, of course,
was pleased with the outcome. "I
thought we played real well. I just
wish the games weren't this rough
this early."
Surprisingly enough, one fellow
who wasn't satisfied was Russell,
who commented after putting
through 29 points, "I've still got
more work to do. My passing isn't
quite as sharp as I'd like it to be.
One of the toughest problems a
ball player faces is knowing when
to pass and when to shoot. And
you don't have much time to think
about it."
Among the interesting side-
lights of the contest was the
referee, who, when John Thomp-
son held out his hand for the ball,
kept the ball and shook Thomp-
son's hand.

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--Daily-Frank Wing
MICHIGAN OUTREBOUNDED TENNESSEE 38-32 Wednesday
and here are two good reasons why. Craig Dill (6'10") and
Oliver Darden (6'9") are two feet off the ground as Darden
snatches a rebound.
SEE EUROPE
THE SSTS WAY

By JACK HARTMAN j
Bowling Green News Sports Editorf
It's not so much how well Bowl-
ing Green will play against Michi-
gan Saturday night but how they
fare in the Mid-American Con-
ference opener against Toledo
Jan. 5.
"We could lose our first seven
games and still play good ball,"
says head coach Warren Scholler,
in his third season at the helm.
He is referring to early season
games with nationally-ranked
teams like St. Joseph's, Oklahoma
City and Michigan as well as
Michigan State, Syracuse, Notre
Dame and Ball State.
"But," Scholler says, "when
that first Mid-American Confer-
ence game rolls around, we'll be
ready."
Why the lack of early season
expectations? The inexperience
and thus the unpredictable nature
of the club are the best answers.
Three Sophs
Three sophomores have already
worked their way into the start-
ing lineup and several more are
pushing for starting berths.
The three who have become
virtual mainstays at a young age
are 6-8 forward Walt Piatkowski,
6-9 center Al Dixon and 6-0 guard
Rich Hendrix. Joining them in the
top five are 6-2 senior guard Nick
Aloi and 6-4 junior forward Sam
Mims.
Before he graduates, Piatkow-
ski could become the most pro-
lific scorer in BG history. An all-
stater in high school, Piatkowski
averaged 21.7 points a game and
10.1 rebounds for last year's fresh-
man team. He hit 49 per cent of
his shots. Many of them were
his speciality, long loping jumpers.
Big Al
Though he has played only three
years of organized ball-two years
in high school and one year as a
freshman-"Big" Al Dixon is al-
readyteing compared to the Fal-
cons former great big man Nate
Thurmond, who is now with pro
basketball's San Francisco War-
riors.
"He's coming along. Day by day
you can see the improvement,"
says coach Scholler about Dixon.
"Probably the most important
thing for him now is game ex-
perience."
Dixonpulled down 19 rebounds
and scored seven points in the
annual freshman-varsity game
Monday night. As a freshman last
year, he poured in 9.7 points a
game and cleared the boards at a
9.6 clip.
A steady, aggressive, leader-
type guard is Hendrix forte. Hen-,

drix banged in 19.1 points a game
as a freshman and maintained a
48 per cent shooting accuracy.
That Boy Aloi
Paired with Hendrix at guard
is cocaptain Aloi. After reaching
a low ebb last season when he
temporarily quit the team ap-
parently disappointed with his.
court performances, the -sharp
shooter from Midland, Pa., has
bounced back impressively.
With a strong second half of
the season, Aloi boosted his scor-
ing average to 14.4, including a 33
point effort against Western
Michigan.
Now Aloi appears to be emerg-
ing as a team leader, something
he has not been in the past.
Smooth, cat-like Mims, a native
of Highland Park, Mich., had
trouble adjusting to the demands
of big-time college ball last sea-
son, but caught fire near the end
of the season when he scored 24
points and grabbed 24 rebounds in
the game against Marshall.
He averaged 10 rebounds a game
last season and scored at an 8.8
clip.
Shoe Filler
Waiting in the wings may be
the greatest player of the lot. He's
6-3 Cliff Williams, who was once
billed to fill Howard Komives'
shoes. That was the 1963-64 sea-
son when Williams was a fresh-
man and Komives a senior. Wil-
liams averaged 23.1 points a game
for the frosh.

But Williams hasn't had a
chance-yet. He tore the muscles.
in his Achilles tendon in pre-
season practice last year and con-
sequently saw no service. Two
operations later he is back to
half speed and has been practic-
ing regularly.
He still has three years of eligi-
bility left. A Williams at full
strength would make a big dif-
ference for the Falcons.
6-4 Carl Assemheimer and 6-2
Bob Hodak, both sophomores, are
DINE OUT
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No Respect for Elders
The sophomores have pushed
two veterans to substitute roles.
6-5 senior cocaptain Bob Van
Poppel, who was injured most of
last season, will be the swing man
a tight end, has an accurate jump
shot and is rugged under the
boards. Hodak, who spent three
years in the service, is a steady,
collected ball player with good
ability.
- ----- - -

pushing to get into the starting
.lineup.

7 A.M.-8 P.M. Daily

Closed Tuesdays

SI

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Specializing in GERMAN FOOD,
FINE BEER, WINE, LIQUOR
PARKING ON ASHLEY ST.
Hours: Daily 11 A.M.-2 A.M. Closed Mondays
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OPEN: Fri.-Sat.-Sun. Noon to 3 A.M. (Closed Tuesday)
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314 DETROIT ST., ANN ARBOR, MICH.
CARRY-OUT ORDERS ONLY-PHONE 665-2266
FREE DELIVERY FRI.-SUN.
BARBECUE CHICKEN AND RIBS
FRIED CHICKEN SHRIMP AND FISH
STEAK AND SHAKE
1313 South University
1/2-b. CHAR-BROILED HAMBURGER STEAK
Potatoes, Salad, Bread and Butter .......$1.20
RIB-EYE STEAK

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Over 20 offices in Greater Detroit area
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1329 S. University-662-5587
Free brochure available

STUDENT BOOK

SERVICE

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Outstanding Christmas Gifts

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at reasonable prices

We set out to ruin
some ball bearings and
failed successfully

ART PRINTS
finest collection in Ann Arbor,
one-dollar each
quality "UNIVERSE" Art Calendars
Also:
posters
full stock of spirals and other supplies
Study guides
Free Bluebooks

Potatoes and Toast

.. $1.35

III

GREETINGS
from
THE HOME OF
CHICKEN
IN THE ROUGH

1215 S. University

761-0700

The Bell System has many small, automatic
telephone offices around the
country. The equipment in them
could operate unattended for
ten years or so, but for a problem.
The many electric motors in those offices.

out to ruin some ball bearings
by smearing them with an
icky guck 'called molybdenum
disulfide (MoS2).
Swock! This solid lubricant, used a certain
way, actually increased the life expectancy

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207 S. MAIN NO 2-3767
Open 7 DAYS 6 A.M.-2 A.M.
Carry-Out Service

needed lubrication at least once a year. Heat
from the motors dried up the bearing oils,
thus entailing costly annual maintenance.
To stamp out this problem, many tests
were conducted at Bell Telephone,
Laboratories. Lubricant engi-
near (enr0 H. Kitchen decdAd

of the ball bearings by a factor
of ten! Now the motors can run
for at least a decade without
lubrication.
We've learned from our
"failures." Our aim: investigate
everything.

An ee .!4

"'r 7

VOW'

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