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August 27, 1965 - Image 7

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1965-08-27

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FRIDAY, AUGUST 27, 1965

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE SEVEN

FRIDAY, AUGUST 27, 1965 THE MICHIGAN DAILY PAGE SEVEN

Povert
WASHINGTON (M)-President
Johnson's antipoverty program is
in deep trouble with some of its
best friends in Congress.
Leading Democrats on the House
Education and Labor Committee,
at a heated meeting with pro-,
gram director Sargent Shriver,
have told him they don't like the
way things are going.
And they are seeking an ap-
pointment with Johnson to urge
that Shriver, who also heads the
Peace Corps, be replaced in one
of his jobs so the poverty program
will have a full-time director.
Scrutiny Program
And the committee is launching
its own nationwide scrutiny of
the program.
Criticism of the program and
demands that Shriver give up one
of his jobs Are nothing new on
Capitol Hill, but up to now it has
been only Republicans who .have
been heard from.
Now it is a group of Demo-
crats who just recently pushed
through the House a bill doubling
the money available for what
Johnson calls a "war on poverty"
and beat back Republican amend-
ments to cut down Shriver.
"Knockdown Affair'
The meeting with Shriver, held
secretly late Monday in the com-
mittee's office, was described by,
one member as "a knockdown,
drag-out affair." It ended amic-
ably, however, with a round of
drinks in the office of Chairman
Adam .Clayton Powell (D-NY).
Although there is unhappiness
among the Democrats with many,
phases of the antipoverty programi
the major complaint is over the
way Shriver is administering the
community action program, which

War Criticism Escalates

'

puts money in the hands of local
groups to carry out plans of their
own design.
It was the intention of Congress,
the Democrats insist, that such
plans could be purely of a neigh-
borhood character, worked out
and run by the people living there.
But Shriver, they say, has chosen
to work, primarily with organiza-
tions set up to represent an entire
city, which means they are dom-
inated 'by the city's public offi-
cials.
Own Fault
"It's our own fault," Powell said
Thursday. "We left it to the dis-
cretion of the director to deter-
'mine the criteria for eligible or-
ganizations instead of writing it
into the bill. We'll take care of
that next year."
Powell's comment provides an-
other ironic, twist, "for it was the
Republicans on the committee who
tried to get guidelines written into
the bill when the program was
established last year.
Powell is following up Monday's
meeting by appointing a special
investigating 'staff to fan out over
the country and inspect com-
munity action prbjects. The House
has authorized $100,000 for the
investigation and Powell has al-
ready started hiring people.
Asking Complaints
He said he is also sending let-
ters to every member of the House
asking them to send along any
complaints they may have re-
ceived about the operation of the
program in their districts.
Investigating teams will leave
Washington and start looking into
the complaints ,after Labor Day,
he said.

FRESHMEN

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MARK RICHMAN DIVISION OF
BUD-MOR AGENCY
1103 S. University (Above Wikels)

Romney, Legislature Slow in
Pushing Tax Reform Measures

(Continued from Page 3)
necessary; state revenues have in-
creased more than enough to wipe.
out a deficit that stood at $86.5
million in 1962. But on the other
hand, state services are taking an
increasingly large bite out of state
revenues to the point where it
has been predicted that Michigan
will be operating in the red agaifi
within a year or two.
Romney, recognizing this fact,
first broached tax reform to the
Legislature in 1963. On the sur-
face, it seemed to many to be
an ideal move. Coming from the
Constitutional Convention and the
first. Republican gubenatorial vic-
tory in 14 years, Romney was in a

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RECEIVING A DEGREE?
IN DECEMBER? IN MAY?
IN AUGUST?
our PictureBeongs in Your Yearbook
BUT IT WILL GET THERE ONLY IF YOU
MAKE A SITTING APPOINTMENT NOW!
* Your picture must be taken by our photographers
to appear in the MICHIGANENSIAN.
* Our photographers will take pictures only
during September.
Make your Appointment NOW at the
MICHIGANENSIAN Sales Booth on the Diag
or at the Cashier's Window in the

fairly strong position in the state.
Second, his party controlled the
Legislature. In addition to all this,
Democrats had been calling for
fiscal reform for years, so their
backing seemed assured.
But notwithstanding all this, it
didn't take long for the bottom to
fall out of the special session on
tax reform called for September,
1963.;
The first potential reform back-
ers to leave the Romney camp
were the state's professional edu-,
cators; disappointed because the
governor failed to give them the
money they felt they needed, they
refused to back 'him. The old folks
lobby was alienated by a require-
ment which would have only given
state tax relief to only elder citi-
zens who could show evidence of
extreme poverty.
Climate Not Right
Butmost of all, the climate
was just not right. The reason
Michigan's tax structure is such
a patchwork is that its provisions
have almost all been created as
stop-gap measures to stave off
financial crisis after financial
crisis. Michigan legislatures have
simply refused to act unless ca-
tastrophe has been around the
corner.
And of course in 1963, the state
appeared far from fiscal catas-
trophe. The deficit was all but
gone and revenues kept on climb-
ing. There was no crisis so there
was no major impetus for bi-
partisan tax reform.
Defeat in 1963, combined with
the fact that 1964 was an elec-
tion year, madeRomney decide
not to attempt tax reform again,
but rather to "clean up" the state
with such action as increasing
care for the mentally ill and im-
proving financial situations at
schools and colleges.

After 1964 came this year's in-
conclusive session, leaving the
coming September special session
as the last hope for reform this
year.
Determined Fight
Despite gloomy Democratic pre-
dictions, Romney appears to be
preparing for a determined fight.
Earlier this month Romney spent
some- time with top legislative
leaders of both parties in an at-
tempt to marshall assistance for
this second attempt at reform.

If this try fails, as it:appears
it may, it will be further testi-
mony to the permanent features
of the Michigan tax reform pic-
ture.

II

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AND STUDENT CENTER
1511 Washtenaw Avenue'
(The Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod)
Alfred T. Scheips, Pastor
Theodore L. Scheidt, Assistant
Sunday services at 9:45 and at 11:15
Sermon topic, "Faith Forward on Campus"
Gamma Delta-Lutheran Student Club Sunday
at 3:30 P.M. Sports afternoon for new
students
at 6:00 P.M. Supper and Program; Dr. N.
Patrick Murray, speaker
Wednesday at 10:00 P.M. Mid-week Devo-
tions
ST. MARY'S STUDENT CHAPEL
331 Thompson
NO 3-0557
Msgr. Bradley, Rev. Litka, Rev. Thomas,
Rev. Ennen
SUNDAY-Masses at 7:00, 8:00, 9:15, 10:45,
12:00, 12:30.
MONDAY-SATURDAY-Masses at 7:00, 8:00,
9:00 and 12:00 and 5:00 p.m.
WEDNESDAY-7:30 p.m.-Mother Perpetual
Help Devotions. Confessions following.
SATURDAY-Confessions: 3:30-5:00; 7:30-
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Worship Services-8:00 and 10:30 a.m.
Holy Communion - Second Sunday of each.
month.
Church School & Adult Bible Class-9 15 a.m.
Holy Baptism-First Sunday of month.
Nursery facilities during worship services and
church school.

FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
1432 Washtenaw Ave,
Ministers: Ernest T. Campbell, Malcolm
G. Brown, John W. Waser, Harold S. Horan
SUNDAY-
Worship at 9:00, 10:30 a.m. and 12.
Presbyterian Campus Center located at the
Church.

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BETHLEHEM UNITED CHURCH
OF CHRIST
423 S. Fourth St.
Rev. E. R. Klaudt, Rev. A. C. Bizer,
& Rev.'A. G. Habermehl, Pastors
9:30 and 10:45 a.m.-Worship Service'
9:30 and 10:45 a.m.-Church School

M M ......

UNIVERSITY REFORMED CHURCH
1001 E. Huron at Fletchern
Pastors: Malefyt and Van Haven
SUNDAY
9:30 Collegiate Discussion Group
10:30 Morning Worship"
5:45 UniversitV'Supper f
7:00 EveningWorship and Discussion
SEVENTH DAY ADVENTIST
CHURCH
meeting temporarily at 1131 Church St.
Pastor T. J. Rasmussen
Sabbath School 9:30 (Saturday)
Worship Service 11:00 (Saturday)
Sermon Topic "Holy Wisdom"
BAPTIST CAMPUS CENTER
& FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
502 & 512 E. Huron 663-9376
SUNDAY, AUG. 29
10:00 a.m. Worship Service
SUNDAY, SEPT. 5
10:00 a.m. Worship Service
2:00-7:00 p.m. Student Picnic, meet at Bap-
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ST. ANDREW'S CHURCH and
the EPISCOPAL STUDENT
FOUNDATION
306 N. Division-Phone 665-0606
Chaplains: Rev. Daniel, Burke, Rev. Mar-
tin Bell
SUNDAY
8:00 a.m. Holy Communion
(breakfast at Canterbury House between
8:00, and 10:00 services)
10:00 a.m. Holy Communion and Sermon
3-8 p.m. Doi-T at Canterbury House
8:00 p.m. Evening'Prayer. (Chapel)
WEDNESDAY
7:00 a:m.-Holy Communion (breakfast ot
Canterbury House following service)
FRIDAY
12:10 p.m.-Holy Communion
LUTHERAN STUDENT CENTER
AND CHAPEL
National Lutheran Council
(American Lutheran and Lutheran Church
in America}
HilI Street at South Forest Ave.
Pastor: Henry 0. Yoder
9:30 a.m. Early Worship Service
11:00 a.m. Chief Worship Service
7:00 p.m. An evening of Getting Acquainted
with new students, student vestry, old stu-
dents and Lutheran Student Foundation
Board members.

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