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August 27, 1965 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1965-08-27

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

PAGE six

HE MICHIGAN DAILY

'P'PTDAV ATInTficm 9n coax

PAGE IX r TT~ ~V ?TLk?"g3lI A

*r5'AEl L 1 £Y, H l~xl A"1 E, 16

5

GOP]
By JAMES MARLOW
Associated Press News Analyst,
WASHINGTON (MP)-The main
chaaacter is different but the
play's the same. This time it's
President Lyndon B. Johnson get-
ting it. In the past 15 years the
other Presidents got it, too, each
in turn.
House Republicans just chang-
ed the script around this week
when they issued a 33-page
"white paper" criticizing the han-
dling of Viet Nam by Johnson

Loads
and the late President John
Kennedy.

Campaign Arsenal

F.

No doubt this, and whatever else
they can put together, will serve
the outnumbered House Republi-
cans as a campaign document in
the 1966 congressional election.
They've been looking for issues
and they'll need them.
Verbal Arsenal
In presidential election years
the convention orators and the
main candidates can do all the at-
tacking necessary.

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In 1950, two months after the
Korean War began and less than
three months before that year's
congressional election, the Repub-
lican National Committee produc-
ed a 55-page indictment of former
President Harry S. Truman.
It cited the loss of China, the
Communist attack on Korea, and
Truman's about-face on Formosa
as policy failures. The Republi-
cans lost the election.
After Ike
The Democratic Advisory Coun-
cil in 1958 took out after former'
President Dwight D. Eisenhower's
administration with a statement
charging it with "six years of
leaderless vacillation" in foreign
affairs.
This was within less than a
month of the congressional elec-
tion, which the Democrats won.
With the exception of 1952 -
when Eisenhower carried his party
to victory-Democrats have won
every congressional election since
1950.
Score JFK
Just as with Truman, but not
as intensely, the Republicans
climbed on Kennedy's back. And
in the 1962 congressional election
year the GOP National Commit-
tee fired at him from its publica-
tion, "Battle Line."
He was charged with being
"less than candid" about Ameri-

can involvement in Viet Nam.,
Kennedy replied he was as "frank"
as possible, consistent with na-
tional security. As usual, the Re-
publicans lost.
Now this latest Republican doc-
ument, besides broad swipes at
Kennedy, accuses JQhnson, as it
accused Kennedy three years ago,
of a "lack of candor" on Viet
Nam. If this seems a coincidence,
there was a greater one. Two, in
fact.
Same Time
In the very week the Republi-
cans chose to put out their "white
paper" on Johnson, he chose to
put out a 27-page document aim-
ed at justifying his handling of
Viet Nam. Perhaps it wasn't such
a coincidence.
What the Republicans had
planned had been known for
days. Johnson got out his explana-
tion ahead of them. And the main
point he sought to make was this:
That American policy on Viet Nam
has been consistent for years. And
no wonder..
'Inconsistent'
The Republicans accused the
Johnson-Kennedy administrations
of inconsistency. Johnson cited
statements by Eisenhower, Ken-
nedy and himself, all promising to
help Viet Nam against commu-
nism.
But, almost as if someone had

tipped him the Republicans were
going to charge him with lacking
candor, Johnson in his preface to
the.27 pages declared he was very
candid:
"It is essential that our peo-
ple seek understanding and that
our leaders speak with candor."
Then, to prove his candor, he
said what followed was a "clear
definition of America's role in Viet
Nam."
Few Readers
It's doubtful many people will
read either Johnson's document or
the Republicans'. The Republicans
firmly say they back Johnson's
policy in Viet Nam.
But then they complain - and
even give the impression of being
puzzled-that, while Johnson and
Kennedy sent combat troops into
Viet Nam, Eisenhower never did.
But the answer is simple enough.
All three Presidents felt a South
Viet Nam free of Communist con-
quest was essential to American
interests. But the Communists
didn't begin their war until near
the end of Eisenhower's presiden-
cy.
So during his administration
there wasn't much need to send
Americans into action. The Com-
munists didn't start to overrun
South Viet Nam until Kennedy
was in the White House.

p
4
4k.,

CHART SHOWS ONE OF MAJOR PROVISIONS in higher education bill-a great increase in student
assistance through grants, loans and scholarships. Major recipients would be educationally deprived
students from low-income areas.
House Approeus 63o Mllir
Higher Education Measure

4

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August 3,0 through September 4 only
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Lime, Inca Gold, Silver, Pearl Gray, Gunpowder, Peach Bloom,
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ANN ARBOR TO CHICAGO
ON A GALLON OF GAS
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WASHINGTON (P-The House
approved Thursday by a 387-22
vote, a broad new program of aid
for the " nation's colleges, includ-
ing the first federal scholarships
for needy undergraduates.
It passed a $637-million bill
designed to improve academic
quality and make higher educa-
tion more readily available to
low- and middle-income families.
The bill, which' carries out the
recommendations of President
Lyndon B. Johnson, now goes to
the Senate, where an even broad-
er measure is being studied by
an education subcommittee.
Statistical
House debate was studied with
statistics showing the rapid rise
in college enrollment, and the
mushrooming of colleges and uni-
versities since the war, and the
problems such expansion has
caused.
"Inadequate library resources, a
lack of qualified teachers, packed
classrooms and insufficient schol-
arship funds characterize many
of the nation's colleges and uni-
versities," according to Rep. Adam
Clayton Powell (D-NY), chair-
man of the Education and Labor
Committee.
Content of Bill
The bill is designed to help in
all those areas. It would author-
ize:
-$290 million to double the
present authorization for con-
struction of college academic fa-
cilities under a 1963 act;
-$197 million for three types of

Immigration Changes Clear,
Senate Subcommittee, 6"!2

WASHINGTON (R) - The ad-
ministration's bill to abolish im-
migration quotas based on na-
tional origin cleared a high hur-
dle yesterday with approval by a
Senate judiciary subcommittee on
a 6-2 vote.
The committee, h o w e v e r,
amended; the measure to put a

student aid-scholarships, or "op-
portunity grants" for needy stu-
dents. guaranteed loans and in-
terest subsidies for middle-income
students, and an expanded work-
study program;
-$70 million to upgrade college
libraries and train librarians;
-$50 million to encourage col-
leges to establish community serv-
ice prograns aimed at seeking so-
lutions to the 'problems of urban
and suburban areas, and
-$30 million to strengthen
small and newly developing col-
leges.
Right To Withhold.
The House adopted without op-
position an amendment that
would prevent the Office of Edu-
cation from withholding funds
from a university because one of
its fraternities or sororities prac-
ticed racial segregation.
Powell. accepted the> amendment,

White, Baby Pink, Baby Blue, Crystal Green, Vanilla, Beige, Moche,
Seaver Brown, Coral, Watermelon, Jockey Red, Crimson, Black, Light
Blue, Sky Blue, Med. Blue, Glory Blue, Navy, Acquamarine, Oriental
Rose, Dubonnet, Loden Green, Light Grey. Heatherstones: Med. Gray,
Charcoal, Gray, Natural, Brown, Light Green, Light Blue, Antique Gold,
Med. Blue, Olive, Copper.

ceiling on immigration from
Western Hemisphere nations for
the first time beginning July 1,
1968.
The ceiling on immigration
from Canada, Mexico and all oth-
er Western Hemisphere nations
will be 120,000 a year, exclusive
of the spouse and minor children
of U.S. citizens.
Rest of World
For the rest of the world, the
annual ceiling will be 170,000 as
in the House-passed bill.
The key feature is elimination'
over the next three years of the
national origin quota system of
immigration, under which coun-
try by country quotas were allot-
ted on the basis of the ethnic
makeup of the U.S. populationin
1920.
House Passed It
The House adopted its immi-
gration measure by a 318-95 vote
Wednesday night after beating
back a Republican-led attempt
to limit Immigration from the
Western Hemisphere.
House Republicans had sought
to hold immigration from North
and South America to 115,000
each year. However, the Demo-
crats mustered enough last-min-
ute support to defeat that restric-
tion by a 218-189 roll call vote.
Present laws permit about 300,-
000 annual immigrants to enter
this country. This level would be
raised by nearly 50,000 in both
House and Senate bills.

offered by Rep. Joe D. Waggonner,
Jr. (D-La), saying his long fight
to keep federal funds from segre-
gated schools and colleges is not
aimed at private clubs or insti-
tutions.
Most of the controversy in the
bill surrounded the proposal for
scholarships, which the bill calls
"educational opportunity grants,"
for needy students.
They .could not exceed $800 a
year and are designed to be used
in conjunction with a loan to per-
mit a student to enter college who
would otherwise be unable to at-
tend.
The bill would increase the pres-
ent National Defense Education
Act loan fund by 25 per cent and
authorize the colleges to use 22
per cent of their allotments for
the scholarships. An estimated
130,000 students Would receive the
grants.

4l

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