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November 20, 1965 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1965-11-20

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PAGE TWO

Ttl1. MICIIIGAN Il , ILV

"ATURDAF, NOVEMUER 20, 1965

PAGE TWO TIlE MICIlIf~AX DAILY SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 20. 1965

-A

I

Players Produce Creative,
Technically Exciting 'Henry VI'

Open City':

Honest,

UNSPECTACULAR 'NANNY':
Bette Hammers .out Chiller

ig 0
f i i cr
1 0.4
eness

By ROBERT MOORE

years of boarding school with a

By MALINDA BERRY
University Players took a daring
step in the field of student pro-
ductions when they decided to
present the seldom - performed
"Henry VI." And the Ann Arbor
community is the winner.
Part 2 of Shakespeare's trilogy
which opened last, night in True-
blood Aud.; is a skillfully produced
play. During this Part motivations
for many of the major characters
are revealed.
Henry VI, played by David-
Rhys Anderson, for instance is
shown to be one of those unfor-,
tunate European monarchs, unfit
to reign, but thrust onto the
throne by. the happenstance of.
birth. He is weak, indecisive, and
torn apart by the intrigues of the
court, which bring death to many
of his friends and family. He says
that "never did any subject long
to be king, as I do long to be
subject." He is unable to control
the maelstrom that swirls around
him.
For a play concerned with char-
acter and plot development Part 2
isn't lacking for action. During

this portion Richard Plantageret,
returning triumphant from Ire-
land, makes his bid for the Crown.
This involves great battles on
stage with the forces of York chas-
ing Henry's loyal forces around
the auditorium. There are also
several bloody duels. Douglas Fair-
banks on the stage of Trueblood.
All the excitement engendered
by the fighting points up the high
technical quality of this produc-
tion. Everything is always correct-,
ly done: blocking, choice of music,

Henry V, long-reigning father of
the ill-fated Henry VI. This ef-
fectively demonstrates the coin-
mon citizen's feeling of awe for
a respected monarch, even though
they have nothing but understand-
able hate for anyone who can read
or write. Cade, abandoned by his
following, pointedly notes "was
ever a feather blown to and fro
like this multitude."
Through ingenious manipulation
the producers of "Henry VI" have
taken an extraordinary complicat-

By GERALD AHIRONIEI
Roberto Rosseilii's Open City
was hu riedly filmed and assem-
bled soon after the liberation of
Rome during World War II and!
was first shown in Septemberl
1945. In many respects this work

mose who have known and dread-
ed the cruelty and depravity of
their foes. It is anger long since
(rained of astonishment or out-
ruge, yet in a spirit of devotion
and sacrifice-simple people dci,g
v hat they think is right.
such a plot an:i delineatiJn are
I. ;l:ntially ba-'tl, especially to an
I.odience now two decades re-
Imoved from the reality w :hich

staging, and prop selection. The ed plot and a difficult play and
elaborate and realistic costumes made an understandable, %xcit-
also do their part very effectively. ing, creative evening of theatre.
As a group of supposedly not-
quite - professionals, University
Players - actors and production Rgi
staff--need apologize to no one. R esignations
Rabble Rousing
ing each other off, the rabble also
rouse. Jack Cade, played marvel-
ously by Stephen Wyman, leads InT *
in an orgy of killing and looting. L
a group of peasants into London f nsingg o iligan ooig
This is a most interesting inter-
lude in the play. The moll is (Continued fromPagex1)
swung from following Cade by an versity, upheld Berman's stand in
appeal to their affection for "+t, ,+uphl>Brmn'-san1 i

was the pioneer in the New Real- bmt1 it. It is dilicult for us now
ism which has since become so to c as deeply moved, not having
characteristic of postwar Euro- t:e harsh memoic; of the 0hoo-
pean cinema. ust, which did take place. etched
I na- ineradicably on our souls. The
jority of contatporah tavant italian dialogue is spare and does
garde" films, Open City does not not preach, permitting the visual
dwell on squalor or dirt---"realism''; vidence to speak for itself, the
for its own sake. For example, the subtitles (by novelist Pietro di
Donato) successfully avoid trite-
viewer is spared such treats as a
hugely magnified fly crawling nefss.
across a woman's lips, the real- T s
istic quality at no time suggests of its time. Amidei, speaking for
this sort of self-conscious per- all engaged in the production,
spective, but rather is inherent in wrote that "we all have been the
the setting (n e w 1 y liberated instrument of the will of an un-
Rome}. locations (the workers' derground army that was anxious
quarter, landin the cast itself Io write its page for the book of
(consisting essentially of unh-
knowns).

record of mental instability and
. immediately exhibits a poutingI
eMichiganhatred for kindly Nanny.I
Mr. and Mrs. Faine (Nanny
1) Bette Davis is an aging i56) raised Mrs. Faine) agree with ther
actress who has recently cashed in psychologist who told them that
on acting experience and a monu- Joey's attitude toward Nanny was
mentally fearsome face to star in caused by a guilt complex created
two money-making horror-mystery when his little sister, after he had
movies, "Whatever Happened to rejected her, drowned in a bath-
Baby Jane?" and "Hush, Hush, tub. But Joey is convinced that'
Sweet Charlotte." Ninny is out to murder him and
2.) Hammer Films is a British that Nanny was involved in the
concern that has turned out con- little girl's death,
sistently popular and effective The mystery of the girl's drown-
horror movies, including "Phan- ing creeps and lunges across the
tom of the Opera," "The Mummy," screen for 95 minutes, until it
and "Bride of Dracula." explodes into another murder (al
The two combine in "The death, incidentally, in the greatest
Nanny," a horror-mystery film of Hammer traditions) and, final-
that exhibits considerable skill ly, into a contrived ending that
but little that has not been done is less messy and more welcome
before. The film as a whole falls than a natural one.
short, for example, of the more The Hammer people and Miss
exciting, deeper "Repulsion" now Davis are pros. The right clues
showing in Ann Arbor. and doubts are teased so that the
Leathery and awful-eyed Miss audience is never sure whether
Davis plays Nanny, the old nurse Joey or Nanny is crazy until the
of the Faine family. Little Joey last 15 minutes. Hammer has made
Faine, 10, comes home from two a serviceable script; and when

that script falters, plunging into
pathos and corn. Miss Davis can
put on an entertaining spectacle
of gurgles, grunts, moans and un-
believable gymnastics with her
eyes, enough to save to scene.
The play has faults. It is glar-
ingly inexpensive: it has a cast
of one ex-actress and six non-
entities, is printed on cheap,
muddy film, and is mainly acted
on one set. Other faults include
mediocre and shadowy photog-
raphy, unimpressive dialogue, and
occasional errors in the basics.
(Snow in one scene when it should
be summer.)
Miss Davis and Hammer Films
put their ugly heads together and
come up with an entertaining
horror-mystery film. It is worth
the price of admission, if you
haven't seen "Repulsion." You will,
however, forget the film.
Ph. 483-4680
&&&q"c0,*CARPENTER ROAD
FREE CAR HEATERS
NOW SHOWING
IKING iTUP
TECHNICOLOR'
"PARE ERG
TECHNIG0LOR' P %
TONIGHT THRU SUNDAY
BOX OFFICE OPEN 6:30
FREE CAR HEATERS

Regyents Approve Revision
Of Distribution Regulations

(Continued from Page 1)
next fall's freshman class.,
Third, the new requirements re-
introduce the mathematics-philos-
ophy option which was abolished
in 1960. The literary college state-
ment which the'Regents approved
said, "Since 1960 . . . the inability
of students to apply credits earn-
ed in matheipatics toward fulf ill-
ment of distribution has put ser-
ious pressure tipon already crowd-
ed degree programs."
Philosophy Courses
Courses in the philosophy de-.
partment will not be allowed to
satisfy both the humanities re-
quirement and the mathematics-
philosophy option.
The revision, of requirements is
the result of a year-long study by
the literary college's Curriculum
Committee. A periodic study of
the requirements and their ef-
fectiveness was begun in -,1960,
when the first major change in
requirements was made.'
Vice-President for Academic Af-
fairs Allan Smith said literary
college counselors will have the
authority to decide if freshmen
this fall, the sophomores of 1966,
wil be allowed to take advantage
Across
Campus
SATURDAY, NOV. 20
7 and 9 p.m.--The Cinema Guild
presents Oliver Twist in'the Archi-
tecture Aud.
S p.m. - The Department of
Speech University Players will per-
form Shakespeare's Henry VI Part
II in Trueblood Aud.
8:30 p.m.-The University Musi-
cal Society Opera presents the
New York Opera Company in Car-
men at Hill Aud.

of the new requirements.
In other action, Vice-President
for Student Affairs Richard Cut-
ler replied to a question put by
Regent Irene Murphy (Birming-
ham) by saying that his office has
finished collecting data for its
pending report on student propo-
sals to set up a University-
sponsored bookstore.
Cutler said he was pressing to
have the report completed by the
next Regents meeting, Dec. 17.
Several Regents have requested
the report then, though classes
will not be in session, sources re-
port.
Hatcher Reports
University President Harlan
Hatcher told the Regents in a
terse statement that his admin-
istration's investigation of the re-
lation between University Micro-
films Inc., owned by Regent Power
and the University's libraries is
continuing.
In addition, Hatcher announced
that "the facts are being sub-
nmtted to outside legal counsel for
review and opinion."
Later Smith recommended, and
the Regents approved, the ap-
point of R. Keith Arnold as the
new dean of the School of Natural
Resources.
Vice-President for University
Relations Michael Radock later
announced that the University's
$55 Million Fund Drive is almost
half way to its final goal.
Having collected approximately
$25.6 million in donations so far,
the program is about $1.9 million
short of its projected December-
end total of $27.5 million.
DIAL 662-6264
Shows at 1-3-5-7£& 9

the matter, saying he was a little
surprised they (the editors) ran
out." Fuzak said he thought the
resigning editors "were just de-
liberately trying to milk all the
publicity possible from the situa-
tion."
The university community re-
acted to the report of the editors
resignation in The Daily with an
air of complete surprise.
Members of the Committee for
Student Rights did a flourishing
business selling copies of Thef
Daily to everyone from President
Hannah's secretary to coeds in the
lunchline at Brodie Hall. On two1
occasions campus police halted
the sale of The Daily by threat-
ening to arrest students for selling
the paper without a permit.

s' ingent necessity far economy in
production, or perhaps as seen in
tL.e careworn faces that a sim-

By New York City Opera Company

ply too real to be merely actor,'
iiasks.
The plot is quite simple, nd
was somewhat "old hat" even in
1945. Manfredi (Marcello Pagliero)
is a partisan leader in Nazi-occu-
pied Rome. His mistress betrays
him to the Germans, only to col-
lapse in horror 'when she blunders
into the interrogation chamber
where he has just been tortured to
death. Don Pietro (Aldo Fabiizi.'
is a parish priest of supreme char-
ity and nobility, yet doomed to be
shot for his own partisan activ -

By LINNEA HENDRICKSON Tomorrow afternoon at 2:30, the
,e Ncompany will present the double
'Ihe New York City Opera Co illfPlnvl

Observant readers -noticed that ties. Pina Anna Magnani) is a
the News, which did not run a widow, eventually gunned down by
story on the resignation did print the Germans while running in
the names of the new editors in tears after a truckload of pris-
the masthead, oers containing her fiance, the
But nonetheless the intrigued father of her unborn child.
student body seemed to take the Except for the Nazi Commander
news in stride. (Harry Feist), the pincipais are
"The only thing that would all heroes, yet they are not con-
create an uprising of individual scious of being szicYn nor are tL-e
awareness at this university would artists who conceived Lhen. These
be a decision by the Board of are anry people, bu" not shril or
Trustees not to go to the Rose hysterical; their rage and heroism
Bowl," observed one CSR leader. is cold, the clarified anger of

At times the film has the ap-
pearance and flavor of a str'aight dcr h t e
documentary, perhaps out ef the

Carmen' To Be Presented

pang, undei the auspices of the
University' Musical Society and
tie direction of Julius Rudel, will
present four operas in three per-
formances this weekend at Hill
Aud.
The first performance will be"
Bizet's "Carmen" at 8:30 tonight.
One of the most popular and
melodious of operas, "Carmen"
was warmly received during the
company's recent fall season in
New York.
Despite its original attack byj
critics, "Carmen" is now univer-
sally accepted as one of the finest
products of the French lyric
theater. It was originally a comic
opera, the words between the arias
being spoken, which have been ;
since replaced by recitatives. 1
--->

and "Cavalleria Rusticana" by
Mascagni. Both ,operas belong to
the "verismo" school of Italian
opera which presents everyday
characters in everyday situations.
This school of realism was intro-
duced with "Cavalleria Rusticana"
in 1890, and popularized in "Pag-
liacci" two years later.
The two operas are usually, per-
formed on the same bill since they
are similar in musical style and,
emotional turmoil.
Rossini's "Barber of Seville" will'
be the Opera Company's closing
presentation, at 8:30 tomorrow
night. This production is new this
season, the first of many now
being designed for the New York
State Theater in the Lincoln Cen-
ter where the company will make

its permanent home in the spring
of 1966.
The "Barber of Seville" is prob-
ably the best loved Italian comic
opera, and it is opera buffa at
its best, changing from senti-
mentality to laughter, and from
drama to burlesque. The sardonic
mockery and sophistication of the
Beaumarchais plays on which it
is based, is not lost in the opera.
The New York City Opera Com-
pany's appearance here is part of
a 26 performance, 19 city tour,
which includes Detroit, East Lan-
sing, Philadelphia, and Cleveland.

I
I /
I /
I /
a TONIGHT at 7and 9P.M.
I I
f /
ROSALLI N I'S
I/
aI
!% en Ctys
1 /
/ '.Ak

0

111

SQL
a

I'M JANE.
ICRYA
T IN
UAREZ ROOT
OF ZERO
arooavic-mvic

The University of Michigan
Gilbert and Sullivan Society
Presents
Pite4 2'(e)njance
December 1, 2, 3, 4
Tickets on Sale 9 A.M.-5 P.M.
Nov. 29-30; Dec. 1-4--Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre
Weid. and Thurs. Performances-$1.50
Fri. and Sat. Performances-$2.00
Sat. Matinee-$1.00
Sat. Matinee Sold Out

%- 4.'"

-% V Y 1 L-% . -% I1 &-% w% P'4

AArvon&-%P9so% 1

11

Ma~rring A-nna magnant
* r
also "Very Nice, Very Nice"
I.
"
"
I N THE ARCHITECTURE A UDITORIUM .
S.AOMISSION: FIFTY CENTS
It
* U
* .... .. . .......I.....

_ I

6

wrw - -
"AN AB$OLUTE KNOCKOUT OF A MOVIE!" 1
--Bosley Crowther, N.Y. Timors i

r
r
r
F
';

SUNDAY, NOV. 21
7 and 9 p.m.-The Cinema Guild
presents "Oliver Twist" in the
Architecture Aud.
7:30 p.m.-Winter Weekend '66
mass meeting, League Ballroom.
Winter Weekend theme will be
announced at the meeting.

va
ROMAN POLANSKI'S
4P: a.k "
HELD OVER "a tour-d
Jill T.1and susper
EllFlawless !

DIAL 5=6290
Nanny had been in
the family for years.
Then, two died
mysteriously.
Two Lived, in terror.
Nanny wasn't
responsible ... was she?

t I

f(e

e-

--Life

HEYRE
IH I
Evacuated From The Dominican
Republic By The U.S. Navy
and Flown to Jamaica
From Puerto Rico Last Night
By Special Plane!

The band that toured Latin America for 14
weeks last spring, was caught in the Dominic-
can Republic revolt, and made it out alive,
played a total of over 100 concerts in 15
countries, and traveled 22,000 miles is per-
forming
AFTER THE
OHIO STATE GAME
THE FABULOUS 18-PIECE
UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN JAZZ BAND
Directed by BRUCE W. FISHER
AN D
THE DON GILLIS TRIO
Michigan Union North Lounge, 4:30 P.M.
FREE! FREE! FREE!

i

w~

WEEKEND '66 UAC WINTER WEEKEND '66
WEEKEND '66 UAC WINTER WEEKEND '66
WEEKEND '66 UAC WINTER WEEKEND '66
WEEKEND '66 UAC WINTER WEEKEND '66
WEEKEND '66 UAC WINTER WEEKEND '66
WEEKEND '66 UAC WINTER WEEKEND '66
A1SSM
Suiday, November 21 ... 7:30 P'.
LEAGUE BALLROOM

AVOTIE PMtMlAflE
9I ' PA MU

I

a

A eP ALA nI It"

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