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November 16, 1965 - Image 9

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1965-11-16

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TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 16, 1965

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

lp&nw wrmw

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

YAL E NN

"UGround
By JOHN SUTKUS surprise formations that fooled
What was it that upset Mich= the defense completely and led to
g What watta? upt Mh- Michigan's demise. Nelson said,
igan last Saturday? "It was not a question of any-
Wa it the defense? Or was it thing they did differently. It
the two key Northwestern plays wasn't a question of our not being
in the first half? Or was it that able to cope with formations. They
Bob McKelvey decided to have a ran what they do best and they
good day and went Wolverine did it very well."
hunting? Coach Bump Elliott summed it
It's really hard to say. It was up when he said, "We were sim-
that kind of a game. ply outhit on defense."
You can't really blame the de- Turning Points
fense too much. They held the And what about those two key
Wildcats to less total yardage than Northwestern plays in the first
the Michigan offense made. But, half?
the fact remains that no single First was the quick kick that
team has ever managed to run put Michigan in the hole and
through the Michigan defense eventually led to the Wildcats'
quite as well as Northwestern did first touchdown. Actually it was
Saturday. a very good football, play (for
Shifted to High Northwestern). Usually when the
The Wildcat running game Wildcats quick kick, halfback
ground into high gear the first Larry Gates lines up as the deep
time they had the ball. And that back in the "I" formation and
turned out to be the story of drops back to kick.
their offense for the rest of the But on this particular play, Ron
day. Rector lined up as the deep back
This did not come totally un- in the "I." The Wolverine de-
expectedly. Rather, Michigan was fenders expected a power sweep.
waiting for the Wildcat, ground instead, Rector dropped back to
game. But as End Coach Jocko kick. He got a good kick away,
Nelson says, "They did a very good good enough .that the ball sailed
Job of it. We didn't think they over the head of the Michigan
would do that good a job of it." halfback who was running back
Neither was it a question of to cover. Naturally the ball took

Game
a Northwestern bounce. Eventual-
ly it went out of bounds on the
12, leaving the Wolverines in a
hole.
Three plays and minus seven
yards later, Northwestern's stack-
ed defense managed to block Stan
Kemp's punt and recover it on
the one-yard line. One play was
all it took for the Wildcats to tie
up the game.
Another Specialist
The other key play of the first
half was the "Smith special."
Smith is the fastest back on the
Northwestern squad, and with 28
seconds left in the first half he
entered the game in a perfect sit-
uation for the long bomb. Perhaps
the Michigan defenders misjudged
the ball in the 22 mph wind or
just made one wrong step. Any-
way, Smith made a very good
catch in the end zone for a 45-
yard TD.
These two plays certainly gave {
the Wildcats life and momentum. a
They enabled them to enter the y
dressing room with the upper
hand. And Michigan was forced to to1
play catch-up in the second half. goo
Northwestern elected to receive
in the second half. Michigan nat-B
urally chose to have the wind at tha
their backs, hoping to force NU the

Upsets

M'

ARKANSAS SECOND:
Spartans Retain No. 1 Rating

By The Associated Press
Michigan State, moving toward
a showdown meeting with Notre
Dame, continued to show the way
yesterday as the No. I team of
the nation in The Associated Press'
weekly college football poll.
Arkansas, with 21 straight vic-
tories over a two-year span, was

a close second, with unbeaten Ne-
braska and once-defeated Notre
Dame not far behind.
Alabama, Southern California
and UCLA followed in that order
as the first seven teams main-
tained the same ratings of last
week Missouri edged into the No.
8 spot and Texas Tech and Florida
moved into the Top Ten, displac-

'Vikings Coach Van Brocklin
Quits Professional Football

CARL WARD, Michigan's leading rusher, sprints for a gain
against Northwestern. Preparing to make the tackle for the
Wildcats is Robert Hubbs.

N I
ENGINEERNG OPPORTUNITIES

scot
had
The
sum
tim
thi
off
sho
V
get
the
20-y
the
ope
H
sti

kick into the wind aird give up
od field position.
Where Is Justice?
But it didn't quite work out
at way. Northwestern turned on
ball-control offense. They
)red the first three times they
d the ball in the second half.
eir first touchdown drive con-
ned seven minutes of valuable
e. Michigan did score in the
rd quarter, but, all told, the
ense had the ball only a very
rt time.
When the Wolverines finally did
the ball, in the fourth quarter,
y were stuck inside their own
yard line with the wind in
ir faces; and they could not
n up the offense.
[owever, the Michigan offense
1had a good day. They pro-

duced over 300 yards again and
outdistanced their Northwestern
counterparts in first downs, rush-
ing yardage, and total yardage.
Injuries, Too
As for Smith, he has a hip in-
jury. Other players, such as Carl
Ward and Dave Fisher, have had
the same trouble this year. The
injury is described as painful and
difficult to play with, but not
permanent.
Wally Gabler suffered a knee
bruise, resulting in his sitting out
a series of downs on Saturday.
Both Smith and Gabler are ex-
pected to be ready for Saturday's
clash with Ohio State.

MINNEAPOLIS-ST. PAUL (P)-
Volatile Norm Van Brocklin, con-
sidered by nearly everyone except
himself as one of professional
football's finest young coaches,
stunned the Minnesota Vikings
yesterday by quitting as head
coach.
The high-strung Dutchman, who
can strike an erring player dumb
with searing words and moments
later charm the crushed athlete,
said there would be no reconsidera-
tion of his decision to resign after
412 years with the National Foot-
ball League team.
The Viking management, shocked
by Van Brocklin's announcement
was not accepting the resignation
at face value, however.
President Max Winter and Gen-
eral Manager Jim Finks said they
hoped to arrange a meeting with
Van Brocklin to try to dissuade
him.
The 39-year-old coach quit less
than 18 hours after the Vikings
suffered a 41-21 loss to the Balti-
more Colts which virtually elimin-
ated them as contenders for the
NFL's Western Conference cham-
pionship.
Finks said Winter and he did
not discuss who would take over
the team.
Van Brocklin said his personal
preference could be offensive line
coach Walt Yowarsky.
"I want to get out of football
now and I have no intention of
reconsidering," said the former
great pro quarterback who guided

i

the Philadelphia Eagles to the NFL
title in 1960 after playing nine
seasons for the Los Angeles Rams.
* * *
Rickey Critical
COLUMBIA, Mo. (a) - Branch
Rickey, a dominant figure in base-
ball for half a century, remained
in a critical condition yesterday.
Rickey, who made champions
out of the St. Louis Cardinals and
led the Brooklyn Dodgers to faine,
was stricken last Saturday while
accepting membership in the Mis-
souri Sports Hall of Fame.
Rickey, the man who brought
the first Negro, Jackie Robinson,
into major league baseball, col-
lapsed into a chair beside the po-
dium. Mrs. Rickey rushed to aid
him as a doctor in the audience
stepped quickly to the chair.
Speeds To Record
BONNEVILLE SALT F L A T S,
Utah (P)-Craig Breedlove took
advantage of a break in the wea-
ther yesterday and became the
first man in history to travel 600
miles per hour on land in re-
capturing the world land speed
record.
Breedlove had held the record
for jet cars four times before. He
broke it only two weeks ago but
lost it five days later to Art Ar-
fons of Akron, Ohio. It was Arfons'
mark of 576.353 m.p.h. that he ex-
ceeded yesterday.

for Seniors and Graduates in

MECHANICAL,
AERONAUTICAL, CHEMICAL,
ELECTRICAL,
and METALLURGICAL
ENGINEERING
ENGINEERING MECHANICS
APPLIED MATHEMATICS
PHYSICS and
ENGINEERING PHYSICS

ing beaten Tennessee and Ken-
tucky.
Duffy Daugherty's Spartans
probably were looking ahead to
the Irish and had to come from
behind Saturday to beat Indiana
27-13 for the Big Ten champion-
ship.
Notre Dame also was paying
more attention to Saturday's date
at South Bend than the business
at hand, but woke up in the last
period to top North Carolina 17-0.
Arkansas remained at Michigan
State's shoulder by defeating Sou-
thern Methodist 24-3, but Ne-
braska had to sweat out a 21-17
edge over Oklahoma State to nail
down a tie for the Big Eight crown
and an Orange Bowl berth.
Next: MSU vs. ND
The Saturday pairings should
provide a real test for the ratings
as six of the 10 teams are in-
volved. Michigan State, No. 1,
takes on Notre Dame, No. 4. Ar-
kansas, No. 2, plays Texas Tech,
No. 9. Southern California, No. 6,
faces UCLA, No. 7, with a Rose
Bowl berth opposite Michigan
State at stake.
Alabama held the No. 5 position
by disposing of South Carolina
35-14. Southern California rolled
over Pitt 28-0 and UCLA downed
Stanford 30-13, setting up their
important meeting at the Coli-
seum.
Missouri's 30-0 romp over Okla-
homa moved them into the eighth
position. Texas Tech's success
against Baylor moved them into
the No. 9 spot and Florida moved
into the rankings again by bomb-
ing Tulane 51-13.
Tennessee, which had been eighth,
fell out of the top rank when it
lost to Mississippi 14-13. Ken-
tucky also dropped down when it
was beaten by Houston 38-21.
The Top Ten with first place
votes in parentheses, season rec-
ords and total points figured on a
10-9-8-7-6-5-4-3-2-1 basis:
1. Michigan State (31) 9-0 456
2. Arkansas (15) 9-0. 439
3. Nebraska (2) 9-0 378
4. Notre Dame 7-1 346
5. Alabama 7-1-1 268
6. Southern California 6-1-1 226
7. UCLA 7-1-1 180
8. Missouri 6-2-1 115
9. Texas Tech 8-1'86
10. Florida 6-2' '42
Others receiving votes, listed al-
phabetically: Auburn, Dartmouth,
Georgia Tech, Kentucky, Louisiana
State, Mississippi, Ohio State,
Princeton, Purdue, Syracuse, Ten-
nessee, Tulsa, Washington State.
NHL
W L T Pts. GF GA
Montreal 6 2 3 15 43 28
Chicago 6 2 1 13 41 20
New York 4 3'3.11.34 28
Toronto 3 6 2 8 19 38
Detroit 2 5 3 7 27 33
Boston 2 5 2 6 17 34
Today's Games
No games scheduled
HAIRSTYLING
to Please
-CONTINENTALS
-COLLEGIATE
-RAZOR CUTS
6 BARBERS
The Dascola Barbers
(Near Michigan Theatre)

NBA

Rugby Champs
The. Michigan Rugby Club
won the championship of the
Southwest Ontario Rugby Un-
ion and annexed the Lambatts'
Trophy by defeating Sarnia 6-3
last Saturday. The winning
score was made in sudden-
death overtime.

EASTERN DIVISION
W L Pct.
Philadelphia 8 3 .727
Cincinnati 9 4 .692
Boston 8 4 .667
NewYork 4 9 .308
WESTERN DIVISION
W L Pct.
Los Angeles 9 6 .600
San Francisco 8 6 .571
'St. Louis 5 6 .455
Baltimore 5 11 .313
Detroit 4 11 .267

GB
5
GB
2
42/2
5

CAMPUS INTERVIEWS
FRIDAY, NOV. 19
Appointments should be made
in advance through your
College Placement Office
Pratt,&.. U
WA hitney UlrtNIT ED, ARR/'CRP1
Aircraft
IA Equal Opportunty Employer
SPECIALISTS IN POWER...POWER FOR PROPULSION-POWER FOR AUIILIARY SYSTEMS.
CURRENT UTILIZATIONS INCLUDE AIRCRAFT, MISSILES, SPACE VEHICLES, MARINE AND INDUSTRIAL APPLICATIONS.

* Today's Games
Ste Louis vs. Philadelphia at N.Y.C.
Detroit at New York
Boston at San Francisco

Professional Football

I

AMERICAN LEAGUE
Eastern Division
W L T Pct. PF PA
Buffalo 8 2 0 .800 218 149
Houston 4 5 1 .444 205 228
New York 3 5 1 .375 186 188
Boston 1 8 1 .111 137 235
Western Division
W L T Pct. PF PA
San Diego 6 2 2 .750 221 160
Oakland 5 4 1 .556 208 168
Kansas City 5 4 1 .556 190 185
Denver 4 6 0 .400 215 267
Sunday's Results
New York 30, Boston 20
Denver 31, Houston 21
Kansas City 31, San Diego 7
Buffalo 17, Oakland 14

NATIONAL LEAGUE
Eastern Conference
W L T Pct. PF PA
Cleveland 7 2 0 .778 239 205
St. Louis 5 4 0 .556 217 172
New York 4 5 0 .444 146 230
Dallas 4 5 0 .444 191 170
Washington , 3 6 0 .333 131 202
Philadelphia 3 6 0 .333 217 232
Pittsburgh 2 7 0 .222 141 207
Western Conference
W L T Pct. PF PA
Baltimore 8 1 0 .888 284 164
Green Bay 7 2 0 .778 178 120
Minnesota 5 4 0 .556 274 272
Detroit 5 4 0 .556 167 180
Chicago 5 4 0 .556 266 207
San Francisco 4 5 0 .444 285 252
Los Angeles 1 8 0 .111 135 258

.. _

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FUTURE REFERENCE
IARGAI

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& FACULTY
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Challenging Careers
Newspaper life isn't all typewriters, presses, dead-
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Someone has to handle the advertising that makes
news gathering possible. Someone has to prepare
payrolls, and handle credit, and purchase supplies,
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An increasing number of these someones" are col-
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After a year in Booth's Training Program, George
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Booth Newspapers are located in Bay City, Mus-
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Jackson, Ypsilanti, and Ann Arbor. Each presents
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careers. Investigate Booth's possibilities before you
decide.

THANKSGIVING
Lv. Ann Arbor Nov. 23, 24, 25
Return by Nov. 30, 1965
CHRISTMAS
Lv. Ann Arbor Dec. 13 thru Dec. 24
Return by Jan. 5, 1966
* EASTBOUND SCHEDULE'
R. T.
No. 368. No. 354 No. 8 No. 356 Student *
Fare I
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* Ar. Detroit X.7:30A 4:00P 7:50P 10:40P '
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a Ar. Buffalo 12:55 P %9:10P 12:37A $21.10
. Ar. Rochester 2:30 P 1 1 :23P 2:OOA 25.90 .,
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" Ar. New York 9:20P 7:1OA 9:OOA 43.75
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Ar. Boston 12:40 P 52.25 "
X-Daily except Sunday. On Sunday leaves at 5:30'AM,
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a WESTBOUND SCHEDULE
R. T. I
No. 17 No. 355 No. 357 No. 369 Student'
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111

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