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November 16, 1965 - Image 3

Resource type:
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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1965-11-16

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TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 16,

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE THREE

TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 16, 1965 THE MICHIGAN DAILY

a 4AA LI i 11 l Ili LY

s

Parliament

Pushes

Strict!

Communist Registration
Declared Unconstitutional

S anctions

for

Rhod

1 E
Government
Peace Story
U.S. Rejected Hanoi
Offer in 1964 As
Without Serious Aim j
WASHINGTON (')-The State
Department confirmed yesterday!
that United Nations Secretary-
General U Thant sent word in:
the fall of 1964 that North Viet
Nain was willing to enter into
talks with the United States at
Rangoon, Burma.
The U.S. rejected the offer, a'
State Department spokesman said,
because "all our indications were
that there was no serious intent
on the other side."
Press officer Robert J. Mc-I
Closkey also told a news confer-
ence that Secretary of Defense
Robert S. McNamara did not join i
in making the decision against:
talks at that time. He said Mc-:,
Namara may have expressed some
opinion but did not take part in
the decision making.
Roundabout Reports
McCloskey said that on a num-
ber of occasions the United States:
had received roundabout reports
of contacts with the North Viet-
namese.
"On the basis of the total evi-
dence available to us," McCloskey
said, "we did not believe at any
time that North Viet Nam was
available for serious peace talks."
Eric Sevareid, radio and tele-
vision commentator, wrote in an
article published in Look maga-
zine he was informed of the 1964
situation by the late UN Ambas-
sador Adlai E. Stevenson.
Policy Determined
McCloskey said that the basic
U.S. policy on peace talks with
North Viet Nam was laid down
by President Johnson April 7.
Johnson said at that time that
the United States was ready to
enter into unconditional discus-
sions.
Under questioning at a news
conference, McCloskey said he
thought that in 1964 the United
States was willing to "enter into"
meaningful talks" and he thought
that was the attitude now.
"I think we're insisting on the
right to make our own interpre-
tation onany initiatives proposed
to us," he said. But, he declared
the United States has not had any
evidence that the Communist side
in the Vietnamese war is interest-
ed in peace talks.

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WASHINGTON t') - The Su- ous risk of incriminating himself.
preme Court held unconstitution- His reply to any of the questions
al yesterday a law requiring mem- in the registration form, the jus-
bers of the Communist party to tice said, could involve him "in
register with the federal govern- the admission of a crucial element
ment. of a crime."
Forced registration under the Reverses Lower Courts
R eaf rm s Subversive Activities Control Act Thus, the Supreme Court re-
of 1950 is inconsistent with the versed the U.S. Court of Appeals
F i f t h Amendmpnt guarantee here and set aside orders by the
against possible self-incrmination, Subversive Activities Control Board:
Cr1o SJustice William J. Brennan; Jr. that William Albertson of New:
said for a unanimous court. York City and Roscoe Quincy
' The decision is believed to cast Proctor of Oakland, Calif., reg-
P ow er Stand serious doubt on the government's ister with it.1
'1.P of the lir in the future to The Justice Department had
move against party members. identified Proctor as a member of
Tories Join Labor Increase Communist Activity the Communist party's national;
To Urge Stroniger ~ National Communist leader Gus committee. Albertson. a Brooklyn
Hall welcomed the decision as: man, was expelled last year by
Economic Reprisals opening the way for increased the Communist party of New York.1
Communist activity. He said in
LONDON (M)-The Labor gov_ New York "wherever it's possible,-
ernment and the Tory opposition we're going to run Communists
joined last night in a drive to for public office. This is some-
push through Parliament a far-: thing we've always wanted to do
reaching law imposing crippling and couldn't."
sanctions on rebellious Rhodesia. Justice Department officials
Atty. Gen. Elwyn Jones told the noted, however, that the ruling is
House of Commons that Queen restricted to the registration of
Elizabeth II, acting through her individual party members and said
governor, Sir Humphrey Gibbs, is they will continue to prosecute
the only legal government in the party members and said they
Rhodesia. will continue to prosecute the par-
But Prime Minister Ian Smith ty for failure to register under the
of Rhodesia, after confronting 1950 law.
Gibbs in Government House in Trial of the party continued yes-
Salisbury, thought otherwise. He terday in U.S. district court here.
told reporters Rhodesia "no long- Force Registration
er has a governor." Asked if he The government has been try-
would try to evict Gibbs from ing to force registration of the
Government House, Smith said he party and its members since the
hoped for a peaceful solution. 1950 law was passed.
Ac rptmif fhad Aaian T-a

Although there was no dissent,
Justice Byron R. White, a for-
mer deputy U.S. attorney general,
noted that he took no part in
consideration of the case.
Justice Tom C. Clark wrote a
separate concurring opinion. As
attorney general in the Truman
administration. Clark said he had
advised Congress in 1948 that re-
quired registration "might be held
to compel self-incrimination."
In 1961, the Supreme Court up-
held a control board order requir-
ing the Communist party to reg-
ister.
Under terms of the act, con-
viction for each day's failure to
register carried a penalty of up
to $10,000 fine, up to five years'
imprisonment, or both.

LLENIC
[ATION

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White Rule
Smith stripped Gibbs of his
powers in declaring independence
{ of Britain last Thursday in a
row with Britain over British de-
mands for ultimate rule by Rho-
desia's 3.8 million Africans. Smith,
spokesman for most of Rhodesia's
225,000 whites, refused.
The House of Commons and the
House of Lords heard Conserva-
tive dissents on the bill to provide
stronger economic r e p r i s a 1 s
against Rhodesia. The dissents
were made in the belief that the
sanctions were punitive and too
harsh. But the leadership on both
sides was clearly in agreement.
The Conservative opposition
agreed in caucus to help Prime
Minister Harold Wilson speed the
bill through.
Blame Conservatives
In the House of Lords, the Mar-
quess of Salisbury took the un-
usual position of withholding any
- blame from Wilson and the Labor
party and laying it at the door of
his own Conservatives, who creat-
ed "distrust in recent years."
Dr. Michael Ramsey, Archbishop
S of Canterbury, told therHouse of
Lords the sanctions were "an ef-
fective moral instrument to
achieve" a moral result.
He insisted the issue was not
one man, one vote or even major-
ity rule, as such, but protection
Mc- for Rhodesia's Africans to obtain
n, di- "real progress in education, civil
gency rights and freedom from racial
discrimination."
Salisbury Action

As resul oIn e eson, tHali
said the party will:
-Publish a basic political pro-
gram or manifesto within two
weeks.
-Call its first public national
convention since 1950. An unan-
nounced one was held in 1958.
-Act to enter candidates in
next year's congressional elections.
Chief Spokesman
Hall describes himself as "chief
spokesman" for the party. He said
the 1958 convention designated
him "national chairman" but he
has never used the title and it
was never announced because of
the 1950 law.
Critics of the 1950 subversive
law contend it puts party mem-
bers on the horns of an impos-
sible and unconstitutional dilem-
ma.
If they failed to register they
could be prosecuted, fined and
sent to jail. If they register, they
tavethemselves open to prosecu-
tion under the Smith Act of 1940.,
the law which makes it a crime
to belong to a group that advo-
cates overthrow of the govern-
ment.
Fifth Amendment
The court followed this line of
reasoning, putting aside all con-
stitutional challenges to the reg-
istration requirements except the
one based on the Fifth Amend-
ment protection against possible
self-incrimination.
This amendment, Brennan said,
in the court's written opinion, is
designed to relieve citizens "of the
necessity of making a choice be-
tween incriminating themselves

Neil lHollenshead
Joan Irwin
Pat McCarty
Don Resnick
Ed Robinson
for
SGC'
Vote

POWER FAILURE:
Officials Find Toronto Rela
~~~~CBredow CasdBaku

World News
Roundup
By The Associated Press
JAIPUR - Critical food short-
ages have gripped much of Ra-
jasthan state in . eastern India,
Chief Minister Moharlal Sukha-
dig said yesterday. He said 520,-
000 persons are hardpressed for
sustenance.
Severe shortages of food grains
are expected in other parts of In-
dia in the next few months due to
crop failures.
FT. GORDON - Former Presi-
dent Dwight D. Eisenhower's phy-
sicians reported yesterday they are
"immensely impressed" with their
heart patient's progress.
A report yesterday morning said
the general had a restful night;
that he is spending his time read-
ing, resting and listening to mu-
sic on a stereophonic record play-
er.
IA DRANG VALLEY-Despite
a heavy pounding from B-52
bombers, a North Vietnamese ar-
my regiment held its positions
early yesterday against troops of
the U.S. 1st Cavalry, Airmobile,
Division in a valley between the
Cambodian border and Plei Me.
The American forces also held
their ground after 36 hours of
hard fighting but sweated out the.
prospects of a new Communist
attack at dawn.
The attack by the B-52's kept
the enemy bunched into an area
two miles by one mile.
NASHVILLE-The 1965 Tennes-
see Legislative Reapportionment
Act, giving the state's five larg-
est counties an additional 16
,;aftq and1 leaving- them lust severn

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WASHINGTON ()--The trig- failure
ger that plunged the nation's at the
Northeast into darkness last Tues- FPC wil
day was a broken relay in a Ca- cials to
nadian power plant near Niagara ary conc
Falls, it was announced yesterday. The B
United States and Canadian of- 1.2 milli
ficials reported their findings aft- 400,000]
er a week of intensive inquiry States t
into the chain-reaction blackout, which r
but said they still don't know the together
origin of the surge of power that ing han
tripped out the automatic relay. watts w
Nor do they yet have recom- to Cana
mendations to prevent future mas- The r
sive power loss. one of
Domino Collapse Beck's c
Government and industry ex- device ti
perts are still digging to find out and set
why so many of the interlinked circuit-b~
U.S. systems collapsed like a row cut off t
of dominoes and brought near- K
paralysis to much of thehnation's The p
most populous area as well as other fc
part of Canada. them ou
The broken relay was pinpoint- upstate
ed by Ross Strike, chairman of the surge tu
Ontario Hydroelectric Commission no other
which operates a system on the Strike
Niagara River. tre
He said it was in his system's frequen
Sir Adam Beck Plant No. 2 at ment bu
Queenston, a village in southern Trans;
Ontario four miles west. of Ni- ing plan
agara Falls. system a
Failure in Toronto to New 1
Strike announced the failure York, th
in Toronto at almost the same ness ove
time Chairman Joseph C. Swidler c
of the Federal Power Commission Swidl
was issuing a report saying the was sent

"seems to have occurred"
Beck plant. He said the
1 work with Ontario offi-
"confirm these prelimin-
lusions."
Beck plant was producing
ion kilowatts and taking
kilowatts from the United
under the grid system in
power systems are linked
to give each other a help-
d. The 1.6 million kilo-
'as being fed northward
dian users over five lines.
elay knocked out was on
the five lines feeding
ustomers. The relay is a
o measure load on a line
a limit beyond which a
breaker will snap open and
he power.
mlocks Out New York
over surged over into the
our circuits and knocked
it. This poured power into
New York systems. The
rned south because it had
place to go.
said the rapid increase in
cy tripped safety equip-
t all of it didn't work.
mission lines and generat-
ts were tripped out in one
after another, reaching in-
England and southern New
rowing a mantle of dark-
r New York City.
ent to White House
er's report on the finding
t to the White House, Sec-

retary of Defense Robert S
Namara and Buford Ellingto
rector of the Office of Emer
Planning.
Secretary of the Interior
art L. Udall says the bla
points up the need for mor
tensive pooling of electricity.
Udall, an advocate of a na
al power grid, said stronge
between utilities might havea
ed the failure. In remarks
dressed to a Toronto audien
indicated that both countries
little choice about power p
because of future demands.

Mew-
ckout
e ex-
ation-
r ties
avert-
s ad-
ce, he
have
ooling

Prime Minister Ian Smith failed 'andrisking se
in two confrontations yesterday to refusing to do
evict Gibbs as he refused to budge By registerm
from Government House. a party mem
Wilson has warned Smith that
any forceful eviction of the gov-
ernor would be regarded as trea-
son.
Scattered violence was reported
in African townships and police
yere placed on alert.

rious punishment for
so."
ng, Brennan wrote,
ber takes the obvi-

i

LUNCH-DISCUSSION
TUESDAY, November 16, 12:00 Noon
U.M. International Center
SUBJECT:
"AN AMERICAN IMPRESSION OF THE
ENGLISH EDUCATION SYSTEM"
Speaker: FREDERICK WALCOTT
Professor Emeritus, English and Education

PANHEL IFC UAC
are sponsoring a
BUCKET DRIVE
for Ann Arbor Tutorial Project
on Wednesday and Thursday
Nov. 17 and 18 ... 8:45 A.M.-5:00 P.M.
the Fishbowl, Engine Arch, Union Steps, and Diag

For reservations,
call 662-5529

Sponsored by the
Ecumenical Campus Center

----
---

A FUNNY THING
HAPPENED ON THE
WAY TO THE FORUM

MARCH ON WASHINGTON
FOR PEACE IN VIETNAM
Nov. 27
MASS MEETING

SOPH
SHOW

a
G.

On November 7, The University of Michigan Interfraternity
Council interviewed the candidates in tomorrow's Student
Government Council eleeton. Subsequent to these interviews
the Interfraternity' Council has endorsed the following candi-
dates.
ROBERT BODKIN
AL GOODWIN
NEILL ROLLENSHEAD
JOAN IRWIN
PAT McCARTY

I.

'65

III'

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T;A,,m+c AUiniinhin

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