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November 16, 1965 - Image 2

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1965-11-16

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'.

PAGE TWO

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

TTESDAY. NOV TK' .19- l am ..-.a~..V-4a~~,~L'

x A~I O~t% , ll Vv l'1v1D '.I lbly p

MOSCOW PHILHARMONIC:
Rastopovich Thrills Audience

ARTS HERE

By CAROL BURCHUK
An exceptionally excellent per-
formance by Mstislav Rostropo-
vich, cellist, and the Moscow Phil-
harmonic orchestra under the di-
rection of Kiril Kondrashin thrill-
ed an audience that gave it five
minutes of final applause and
bravos.
Rostropovich brought the aud-
ience to the edges of their seats
with his performance of Tchaikow-
sky's "Variations on a Rococo
Theme." Usually this is an overly
ornate piece of music, but Ros-
tropovich was able to impart beau-
tiful singing lines in the canta-
bile passages and exploit the tech-
nically virtuosic passages for their
musical values as well as for their
show.
In passages that require .con-
centration on co-ordination of a
difficult spiccato bow with an
equally difficult left hand, Ros-
tropovich was able to look to the

first violins to conduct them on
their entrances and phrasing.
The audience might have noticed
the unusual end pin and the un-
usually horizontal angle of Ros-
tropovich's cello. This is in part
responsible f o r Rostropovich's
amazing technique in the higher
positions as it makes the lower
end of the finger board more ac-
cessible.
After the intermission Richard
Strauss' "Don Quixote" showed
more of what the orchestra could
do. Kondrashin was meticulous in
his demands on the orchestra for
contrasts. He made the most of
the dynamics indicated by the
score, but he abused the use of
variety that can be given by tempo
changes. This was more evident in
Brahms' "T h i r d Symphony,"
which was played in the first half
of the program.
In viewing each section of the
orchestra one could be impressed

by the brilliant quality of the
strings, but could not judge the
woodwinds and brass as being
their match.
Once again in the Strauss, Ros-
tropovich commanded the atten-
tion. One outstanding moment in
the work was the duets between
the viola and the cello. Another
was Rostropovich's deeply moving
musical interpretation of Cervan-
tes' dying Don in the Finale.
The program showed the orches-
tra in its most familiar repertoire
as it oriented itself around ^the
lush and the Romantic. Soviet
music, which is directed at the
proletarian tastes, is Romantic in
order to be accessible. It is in-
teresting to note that all of the
compositions on the porgram were
popular American favorites and it
was unfortunate that no compo-
sitions , from the Contemporary
Soviet literature were played.

Across Campus
TUESDAY, NOV.16 THURSDAY, NOV. 18
4-8 p.m.-Sorority Rush Regis- 10 a.m.-2 p.m.-Sorority Rush
tration for freshmen at Stockwell, Registration for freshmen at the
Lloyd and South Quad (Hunt Women's League, Kalamazoo Rm.
House) lounges. 2:15 p.m.-Herman Koenig, of
4:30 p.m.-Guillermo Espinosa Michigan StaterUniversity will
will speak on "Achievement of talk on the "Stimulation of the
International Relations Through University" in 1057MHRI.
Music" in the Recital Hall, School 4:10 p.m. - Visiting Professor
of Music. Luigi Salerno of Pennsylvania
8 p.m. - Elizabeth Converse, State University will discuss "Ro-
managing editor of the Journal of coco Art in Rome" in Aud B Angell
Conflict Resolution, will discuss Hall.
"Finding Out What We Think 7 and 9 p.m.-Cinema Guild will
We Know Already" at the First present Oliver Twist in the Archi-
Presbyterian Church. tecture Aud.
8 p.m.-Jose Barchilon, M.D., 8 p.m. - The Department of
University of Colorado will lecture Speech University Playeers will
on "Some Unconscious Factors in perform Shakespeare's Henry VI
the Teacher-Learner Relationship" Part I in Trueblood Aud.
in the Auditorium, Children's Psy- 8:30 p.m.-School of Music Fac-
chiatric Hospital. ulty Concert will be "Early Italian
8:30 p.m.-The University Musi- Music in Honor of Dante's 700th
Society Concert presents the Mos- Birthday" in Rackham Lecture
cow Philharmonic Orchestra, Ev- Hall.
geni Svetlanov conducting at Hill FRIDAY, NOV. 19
Auditorium. 4 p.m.-Hans Thirring, of Vien-
WEDNESDAY, NOV. 17 na University will speak on "The
8 a.m.-5:30 p.m.-SGC election Future of Space Industry" in 170
polls will be open. Physics-Astronomy.
10 a.m.-2 p.m.-Sorority Regis- 7 and 9 p.m.-The Cinema Guild
tration for freshmen at the Wom- will present Oliver Twist in the
en's League, Kalamazoo Room. Architecture Aud.
12 a.m.-Toby Hendon, director 8 p.m. - The Department of
of The Children's Community Ann Speech University Players will per-
Arbor, will discuss the book form Shakespeare's Henry VI Part
"Teacher" by Sylvia Ashton- II in Trueblood Aud.
Warner in Rm. 2 Michigan League. 8:30 p.m.-The University Musi-
8 p.m.-Department of Speech cal Society Opera presents the
University Players Performance of New York Opera Company in Car-
Shakespeare's "Henry VN Part I" men at Hill Aud.
will be given in Trueblood Aud. SATURDAY, NOV. 20
8:30 p.m.-School of Music Fac- 7 and 9 p.m.-The Cinema Guild
ulty Concert, a String Trio at presents Oliver Twist in the Archi-
Rackham Lecture Hall. tecture Aud.

Sit-Downs: Tradition
Clashes with Change

(Continued from Page 1)
for sit-downs and cafeteria-style
meals which involve less compli-
cated work.
After a meeting at which griev-
ances were discussed, Pearson es-.
tablished a substitute list of 25 to
30 girls in the hall who would be
willing to work the Sunday sit-
downs if pre-arranged by kitchen
staff members. This list went into
effect the week before a preference
poll was taken among Stockwell
residents on the issue of the re-
tention of the sit-downs.
According to Kathy Dickson,
'68, Stockwell president, 269 girls,
a house majority, voted in favor
of retaining sit-downs, with 139
voting against. Of those voting
for its retention, 105 wanted them
twice'a month .and 85 supported
the present four times a month.
Since the formation of the sub-
stitute pool, no subsequent griev-
ances have been brought to Pear-
son's attention. Miss Dickson also
believes most girls are satisfied
with the sit-downs as they are
now.

"Other than the normal com-
plaints about the quality of dormi-
tory food, I haven't heard any
negative reactions, she said.
Staff Diss'atisfied
Susan Weiss, '68, spokesman for
the ad hoc committee of Stockwell
kitchen workers, indicated that
most of the serving girls do not
feel the matter is settled. Accord-
ing to her, the results of the opin-
ion poll were given to Leonard
Schaadt, business manager of resi-
dence halls.
"We re-directed our efforts to-
wards Schaadt and Eugene Haun,
director of residence halls, after
the meeting with Pearson," Miss
Weiss said, "as we felt that chan-
nels of communication within the
dorm were ineffectual."
According to Miss Weiss, the
interview with Schaadt two weeks
ago resulted in no change in the
present policy and little indication
that any change will take place
before next semester. Miss Weiss
said the girls are dissatisfied with
the system of substitution as they

GENERATION, the campus arts
magazine, goes on sale today.

...........:... ........ . . .........%..'. . . ... ... ........... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ...

have difficulty getting girls
work on specific Sundays.

to

I

The Daily Official Bulletin is an T
official publication of the Univer-t
sity of Michigan, for which The f
Michigan Daily assumes no editor-
lal responsibility. Notices should be
sent in TYPEWRITTEN form to I
Room 3519 Administration Bldg. be- '
fore 2 p.m. of the day preceding
publication, and by 2 p.m. Friday ]
for Saturday and Sunday. General I
Notices may be published a maxi-
mum of two times on request; Day
Calendar items appear once only.
Student organization notices are not
accepted for publication.
TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 16
Day Calendar
Center for Programmed Learning for
Business Workshop-"Developing Cri-
terion Frames": Michigan Union, 8:30
a.m.
University Management Seminar --
"Orientation to Supervisory Practices":
4558 Kresge Hearing Research Insti-
tute, 8:30 a.m.
University Management Seminar -
"Managing the Departmental Office":
4558 Kresge Hearing Research Institute,
1:30 p.m.
University Management Seminar -
"Effective Cost Control": Michigan Un-
ion, 1:30 p.m.
School of Music Lecture-Guillermo
Espinosa, "Achievement of Interna-
tional Relations Through Music": Reci-
tal Hall, School of Music, 4:30 p.m.
Dept. of Psychiatry University Lecture
-Jose Barchilon, M.D., University "of
Colorado, "Some Unconscious Factors
in the Teacher-Learner Relationship":
Aud., Children's Psychiatric Hospital,
University Musical Society Concert -
Moscow Philharmonic Orchestra, Ev-
geni Svetlanov, conductor, Hill Aud.,
8:30 p.m.
General Notices
Student Tea at the home of Presi-
dent and Mrs. Harlan Hatcher on
Wed., Nov. 17, from 4-6 p.m. All stu-
dents are cordially invited.
Joint Judiciary Council: Petitioning
is now open for five student members
of the Joint Judiciary Council and
two student members for the Univer-
sity Committee on Standards and Con-
duct. Deadline date, Nov. 17, at 5
p.m, Interviewing will be on Nov. 21
and 22 in the SGC Rm., Third Floor,
SAB. Petitions are available in Rm.
1011 SAB.
Doctoral Examination for William
Roger Myers,. Nuclear Science; thesis:
"Neutron Scattering in Stretch-Orient-
ed Polyethylene," Tues., Nov. 16, 315
Auto. Lab., N. Campus, at 10 a.m.
Chairman, J. S. King.
Doctoral Examination for Richard
Russell Swain, Biological Chemistry;
thesis: "Studies on the Origin and
Function of the Cotyledonary Amylase
of Pisum sativum," Tues., Nov. 16, 5423

Medical Science Bldg., at 10 a.m. Co-
Chairmen, E. E. Dekker and Merle Ma-
son.
Doctoral Examination for Edgar Mil-
an Palmer, Mathematics; thesis:
"Graphical Enumeration and the Pow-
er Group," Tues., Nov. 16, 2235 Angell
Hall, at 2 p.m. Chairman, Frank Har-
ary.
Doctoral Examination for Herbert
John Brinks, History; thesis: "Peter
White: A Career of Business and Poli-
tics in an Industrial Frontier Com-
munity," Tues., Nov. 16, 3609 Haven
Hall, at 4:15 p.m. Chairman, W. R.
Leslie.
Institute of Public Administration
Social Seminar scheduled for Wed., Nov.
17 has been rescheduled for Dec. 1.
Student Government Council Approval
of the following student-sponsored
events becomes effective 24 hours after
the publication of this notice. All
publicity for these events must be
withheld until the approval has become
effective.
Approval request forms for student
sponsored events are available in Room
1011 of the SAB.

Galens Honorary Medical Society,
Galens Tag Day bucket drive, Dec. 3-4,
7 a.m.-9 p.m., campus and Ann Arbor.
Foreign Visitors
The following are the foreign visi-
tors programmed through the Interna-
tional Center who will be on campus
this week on the dates indicated. Pro-
gram arrangements arerbeing made by
Mrs. Clifford R. Miller, International
Center, 764-2148.
J. F. D. Wood, head of the Depart-
ment of General Studies, University of
New South Wales, Sydney, Australia,
Nov. 10-17."
Torsten Husen, educational research
and educational policy, Sweden, Nov.
15-16.
.Mrs. Mary Gray, Asia Foundation,
U.S., Nov. 15-16.
George Gallo, Creole Foundation, U.S.,
Nov. 16-17.
Ernst Michanek, Sweden, Nov. 17.
Tosa Tisma, rector, University of Novi
Sad, Novi Sad, Yugoslavia. Accompan-
ied by escort-interpreter, Frank. Gon-
zalez-Frese, Nov. 18.
A. Fathy Bahig, cultural attache,
Embassy of the United Arab Repub-
lic, Washington, D.C., U.A.R., Nov.
21-22.

Placement
POSITION OPENINGS:
Cunningham-Limp Co., Detroit, Mich.;
-Civil Engr. graduates for 1. Field
Engineers-work on job site doing lay-
out, surveying, etc., projects last 6
mos.-1 yr. mostly east of Miss. 2. Esti-
mators-for engineer-built const. proj -
ects in Det. office. 3. Designers-with
(Continued on Page 6)

Dial
662-264

ENDING TODAY
CHARLTON HESTON
"THE WAR LORD"

STARTING WEDNESDAY
Any-night girls and overnight glory-
they press 'em all to the limit!

DIAL 5-6290
EUNNYKEI
ISE MISSIN

.I

SEE AT THE MICHIGAN "BUNNY LAKE IS MISSING"
SEE AT THE STATE "RED LINE 7000"
NOTE: Men are welcome at regular admission price
- iA ADIESDAY
;Milnr wO*'(js'O4 ...,4r
,r...Ik State & Michigan
PAY-
ONLY6Pmj

ItCE-
X.-L

"YOU'LL BE TALKING ABOUT THIS FILM FOR
WEEKS. DON'T MISS IT, UNLESS YOU LIKE TO
SLEEP AT NIGHT!"--Alan Glueckman, Mich. Doily
"AN ABSOLUTE KNOCKOUT OF A MOVIE"
-Bosley Crowther. NY. Times
V
ROMAN POLANSK'S
"A tour-de-
force of sex
and suspense!
DIAL6 Flawless"
8-64' MagALLife
86416Magazine

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41

9

~ lANE SWI A 6,ULI -m 0 V uWI iiE ilM
TECH/NIOoR CMN-DEVON-HIRE-HOLT-CRAVFORD ILL-WARDALDEN
A lyHOWARD HAWKS &- ~iGEORGE KIRGO a oNl1 IDOLE[uf

AN MM r PREMINGER FILM
LAURENCE OLIVI ER
CAROL LYNLEY
THE ZOMBIES
NOEL COWARD
-NEXT
"THE NANNY"

sr,, -

I

I

"I

A

INTER

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L
E

EEKEND '66

MASS MIEETING

X
A
N
D
E

4

Sunday, Nov. 21,7:30 P.M.

B
A

LEAGUE BALLROOM

AJ.
STENOGRAPHIC
SERVICES
308 Municipal Court
Building
Ann Arbor, Michigan
DISCOUNTS TO STUDENTS
on theses, term papers, etc.
All public stenographic
and secretarial services.
FREE PICKUP AND
DELIVERY
Angie Jones, 665-3786

-Theme To Be Announced-

I

I

I

House Minority Leader

S

GE

L

E
S
N
C
K

0
B
N
S
N

M
A
N
N

FORD

(R-Grand Rapids)

NAVE FUN WORKING IN EUROPE.
WORK IN
EUROPE
Luxembourg - All types of
summer jobs, with wages to
$400, are available in Europe.
Each applicant receives a tra-

addresses the University Community
Thursday, Nov.,18 in the Michigan

'.

Leaaue Ballroom at 8:00 p.m.

11 I

11

I ° _ d- ®-®-...

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