100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

November 11, 1965 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1965-11-11

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 11, 1965

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE THREE

THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 11, 1965 THE MICHIGAN DAILY

4

Aloa

Rescinds

rice

nerease

WASHINGTON (')--Alumnium
Co. of America, the industry'sj
biggest producer, last night can-
celed price increases it announced
last week -increases government
officials attacked as inflationary.
Alcoa officials informed Secre-
tary of Defense Robert S. McNa-
mara of the firm's willingness to
withdraw the increases.
Moments later, Alcoa headquar-
ters in Pittsburgh, Pa., issued a
formal statement rescinding the

half - cent - a - pound increase for
the metal. The price thus remains
at 241/2 cents a pound.
The company said it "felt com-
pelled to cancel the price restora-
tion because of the insistence of
the government that it is urgently
concerned about the possible ef-
fect of any general adverse price
increases on the national economy
while the Viet Nam military oper-
ations are being waged."
In Johnson City, Tex., the Texas

White House said President John- with McNamara and Deputy Sec-
son had been informed of Alcoa's retary of Defense Cyrus R. Vance,
decision, but would have no im- the spokesman said.
mediate comment. In return, McNamara agreed to
There was no immediate com- the immediate resumption of ne-
ment by Reynolds Metals or Kais- gotiations for the orderly disposal
er Aluminum & Chemical Corp., of 1.4 million tons of aluminum
other major aluminum producers. now held in government stock-
Alcoa President John Harper piles.
and Executive Vice-President Lee The defense chief also said he
Hickman informed McNamara of believed it would be possible to
the firm's willingness to back off limit the quantity of metal dis-
the price increases in a meeting posed from the stockpile next

year to less than 200,000 tons.
The Alcoa price rescinding was
viewed by officials as a victory
for the government in its attempt
to avoid a wave of inflation by
price increases.
Arthur Sylvester, assistant sec-
retary of defense, said Harper and
Hickman told McNamara they
continue to believe the price in-
creases are required by the alu-
minum industry to maintain ade-
quate profits.
However, Sylvester said, the
Alcoa officials also said they rec-
ognized the need to maintain price
stabiitly at a time of rising de-
mand and increasing defense pro-
duction associated with operations
in South Viet Nam.
Therefore, the Alcoa officials
said, they are prepared to rescind
the price increases for aluminum
ingot and -fabricated products an-
nounced by the company.

Sylvester said other members of
the aluminum industry are being
invited to join in the stockpile
negotiations "and it is hoped they
can be resumed promptly."
Harper and Hickman requested
the meeting with McNamara,
Sylvester said.
Officials of the General Services
Administration announced Tues-
day they had begun making prep-

arations for the immediate sale of
100,000 tons of aluminum from
the government's surplus stock-
piles.
Officials of Kaiser Aluminum
and Dow Chemical Corp., two
large aluminum producers, called
Monday for renewed talks between
industry and government over the
amount and method of sale from
the stockpiles.

The aluminum price increases
were announced last week and
White House spokesmen immedi-
ately made it clear the government
considered the raises inflationary.
At a news conference last Sat-
urday, Gardner Ackley, chairman
of the President's Council of Eco-
nomic Advisers, described the in-
creases as inflationary and not
justified.

I

r

i

Power

Failure

Prompts

SQuestions,

Speculations

and
CONCERT DANCE ORGANIZATION
PRESENT
"AN EVENING OF DANCE"
FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 12

By The AssociatedPress
NEW YORK-The enormity of
America's most stunning tech-
nological breakdown emerged with
frightening clarity yesterday but
the mystery of how it could have
happened remained as dark as the
10-hour power blackout itself.
About 30 million Americans, a
sixth of the population, felt the
effect of the paralyzing electrical
failure in seven northeastern
states and parts of Canada.
At its peak, the breakdown
spread over 80,000 square miles of
the nation's most populous corner,
trapped 900,000 persons in com-
muter trains, elevators and office
buildings in scores of cities, and
set in motion a mobilization of
police and emergency forcesĀ° un-
matched outside of a war or dis-
aster area.
Origin Unknown
Consolidated Edison Co. and
Niagara Mohawk Power Co. offi-
cials said they still could not pin-
point the precise origin of the
failure.
The abrupt plunge into darkness
brought home to those who exper-
ienced it the utter dependency on
electrical power.
People stranded downtown and
lucky enough to get a hotel room
walked up many flights of dark-
ened stairs to darkened rooms and
found them without water be-
cause electrical pumps were down.
Cash registers wouldn't open, fill-
ing station gas pumps wouldn't
work, doorbells wouldn't ring.
Five thousand off-duty New
York policemen were called out
r to aid the 7000 already on duty,
Speculate Sabotage
In foreign capitals, the word
sabotage came quickly to many
lips and found its way speculative-
ly into, the press. Such speculation
probably will die hard, despite

4?
v---1
Where is our biggest challenge --
in. space, or on some battlefield?
Or does it lie in the realm of
thought, where men strive for
deeper insight and spiritual re-
newal ... for the discovery of man
in God's image. There's so much
more to life than what's on the
surface. Hear this public lecture
titled "The Mythology of Matter"
by LENORE D. HANKS, C.S.B.,
member of the Board of Lecture-
ship of The First Church of Christ,
Scientist, in Boston, Mass.
Christian Scic lecture
FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 12
8:00 P.M.
AUDITORIUM A, ANGELL HALL
Admission Free . Everyone is welcome

Performances:

7:30 p.m. and 9:00 p.m.

BARBOUR GYMNASIUM STUDIO
ADMISSION COMPLIMENTARY

p4

k

I,.-'- - - ---

TODAY and TONIGHT
NATHAN A. SCOTT, JR,

TWO UNIVERSITYLECTURES:
4:15 and 7:30 pm.-Multipurpose Room, UGLI
"THE CRISIS OF FAITH IN THE NEW THEOLOGY
AND THE PROMISE OF GRACE IN POETIC ART"

-Associated Press
SHOT ATOP EMPIRE STATE BLDG. Tuesday night shows New York buildings blacked out while
lighted New Jersey shore sparkles behind them.

apparent official agreement in
Washington that no sabotage was
involved.
The blackout news, conveyed to
many people in Europe, Asia, Af-
rica and Latin America in huge
headlines, in some minds becomes
a military fact. It remains so for
them even though the U.S. State
Department announced that an
emergency generating system, put
to an unexpected test, kept a net-
work of military communications
with northeastern bases intact
during the power crisis.
Consolidated Edison, w h i c h

serves New York City and some
of the metropolitan area, said in
a statement that the blackout
"seems to have been caused by a
massive loss of generating capacity
somewhere on the interconnected
electric system to the north of
our territory."
"This threw so much load on
the remaining facilities of the
combined electric companies in the
Northeast that they were unable
to meet the demand and the en-
tire electric system collapsed, los-
ing its synchronism," the com-
pany said.
Government Reaction
Uppermost in the minds of
Washington officials was the se-

curity of the nation, though the
notion of sabotage seemed remote.
President Johnson ordered
Chairman Joseph C. Swidler of.
the Federal Power Commission to
direct an.investigation which is
sure to raise questions about the
power grid which, ironically, was
set up to prevent just such a
breakdown.
Swidler stated the problem:
"This incident demonstrates
what everybody realized all along
but never thought about: the ab-
solute indispensability of electric
power and the fact that we can't
tolerate a system-wide interrup-
tion under the highly developed
power conditions we have today."

/

VIETNAMESE CONFLICT:
Both Sides Initiate
New War Tactlcs

Nathan Scott was born in Cleve-
land, reared in Detroit, and re-
ceived his A.B. from the University
of Michigan in 1944. Since then
he has received his B.D. from Un-
ion Theological Seminary, his Ph.D.
from Columbia University, a Litt.D.
from Ripon College, and an L.H D.
from Wittenburg University. He is
a priest of the Episcopal Church,
a Fellow of the School of Letters
of Indiana University, and pres-
ently. is Professor of Theology and
Literature at The University of
Chicago Divinity School.
Natl
Fall Series

Among a total of twelve,
Scott has authored the following books:
Rehearsals of Discomposure: Alienation
and Reconciliation in Modern Literature
The Tragic Vision and the Christian Faith
Modern Literature and the Religious Frontier
Albert Camus
Reinhold Niebuhr
Man in the Modern Theatre
Samuel Beckett
Four Ways of Modern Poetry
han Scott, Jr. is the final lecturer in the
sponsored by The Office of Reilgious Affairs,
The University of Michigan

By The Associated Press
SAIGON--The Vietnamese war
has taken two dramatic twists-
the Viet Cong are no longer run-
ning from the Americans, and yes-
terday, for the first time, an
American held operational control
of a Vietnamese fighting unit.
The Communists displayed their
new boldness in three engage-
ments in the past week.
In the past seven days, more
U.S. soldiers have died in the
tropical jungles of South Viet
Nam than in any week of battle
since the Korean War.
New Tactics
The view here is that, the Viet
Cong have adopted new tactics to
cope with U.S. ground offensives.

Instead of-melting into their jun-
gle sanctuaries in the face of
American combat troops, they are
lying in wait just as they do
against the South Vietnamese.
Meanwhile, . Col. Thell Fisher
of Springfield, Va., was in over-
all command of Vietnamese ma-
rines and American Leathernecks
who moved yesterday against the
Viet Cong on a rain-flooded coast
40 miles south of Da Nang.
This was a departure from prac-
tice of the last four years, in
which American military men
have been limited to advising their
Vietnamese allies. Unaltered, how-
ever; is the U.S. position that the
struggle is fundamentally a Viet-
namese war.

The B'ani Brith Hillel Foundation
jointly with Beth Israel Congregation
Dedicates Its
SABBATH SERVICE to "ISRAEL"
Tomorrow
November 12-TH IS WEEK ONLY AT 8:00 P.M.
AHAROW S. KIDAN
Noted Israeli Statesman and Journalist, will speak on
"Israel's Immigrant Population; Cultural Pluralism or Integration"
Student Participants:
Alice Applebaum Barbara Becker Steven Goldberg
Sima Juliar Shirley Tanner
John Plower, Jules Gardin, CANTORS with THE HILLEL CHOIR
Reception, Oneg Shabbat, and Discussion follows Service.
1429 HILL STREET ALL ARE WELCOME

11

World News Roundup

'

M

By The Associated Press
JAKARTA, Indonesia - Presi-
dent Sukarno announced yesterday
he has lifted martial law imposed
on Jakarta and surrounding ter-
ritory "Oct. 2, a day after the
Communist-inspired coup that
failed.
* * *
HAVANA - Cuba's Communist
regime pressed the United States

yesterday to exchange Cuban po-
litical prisoners for pro-Commu-
nists jailed in other Latin-Amer-
ican nations.
UNITED NATIONS -- France
spoke out yesterday for the first
time in the United Nations on
behalf of seating Communist
China, and declared the long-
standing dispute should be settled
by simple majority vote.

TONIGHT

The University of Michigan Opera Dept.

THIS IS THE MOST
POWERFUL LETTER

presents

'l

RICHARD WAGNER'S

IN THE ALPHABET...
when used on election day!

UNIVERSITY PLAYERS
present in repertory

LOHENGRIN

I

i

11

II I II I II I

II liii I &%m o I#.L:&% I..hLl~.mi u. ~ v IIItllID ; 4faraefeI0t'

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan