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November 10, 1965 - Image 2

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1965-11-10

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PACE TWO

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 10, 1965

?AfE TWO THE MICHIGAN DAILY WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 10, ~985

Peace Corps Official Sees 1-A
Status for All; No Deferments

ANN ARBOR PREMIERE:
Music School To Present Lohengrin'

(Continued from Page 1)
to become a teacher while devot-
ing her summers to Operation
Head. Start.
Perhaps a boy would ask his
board that he be allowed to spend
two years in business college, then
go into the air force to specialize
in electronics and go on to start
a TV repair business.
Mode of Selection
On the basis of the results of
the student's test, his personnal
preferences, and manpower needs,
the local selective service board
could mesh individual desires with
the national interest.
Satin emphasizes that under
such a plan, students, girls, and
the phyically disabled, who all
currently enjoy Selective Service
deferments, would become 1-A.
About the abolition of 2-S sta-
tus, an idea that has been widely-
discussed by Students for Demo-
cratic Society, Satin notes: ,
"Just because a young man
can't afford to attend college
doesn't mean he should have to
fight in Viet Nam."
Not Hinder Education
However, abolishing student de-
ferments would probably not
stand in the way of individuals
who want to pursue a college edu-
cation. Students could continue to
fulfill their military obligation
through two years of military
service upon graduation, member-
ship in ROTC, or taking' part in
such projects as Peace Corps and
helping migrant farm workers
during summers.
As for making girls 1-A, Satin
says frankly: "We've left behind
our Victorian attitudes about
women on a pedestal. They can't
have it both ways. If they want a
voice in societythen they have to
face up to the obligations of that
society."
As for the physically-disabled,
the Peace Corps official is quick
to point out that he had two blind
volunteers serving under, him in
the Dominican Republic. Noting
that many college athletes attain
1-Y. draft exemptions for such
phenomena as "football-knee"
and' shoulder separations, Satin
thinks the present system is in-
equitable..
"Cassius Clay is 4-F, but he
could ,still, do a fine Job teaching
physical education at a Job Corps
camp."'

What about students using the
new system to get out of military
service.
"It certainly takes as much
guts to face the hostile environ-
ment in Alabama and Mississippi
as it does to face the hostile en-
vironment in Viet Nam and other
areas," observes Satin.
Moreover he says, "I think our
curent Peace Corps selection tech-
niques are capable of separating
the kinds of motivations that
people might bring to the Peace
Corps."
Satin is convinced after talking
to student activists throughout
the country that few of them are
draft dodgers.
"I think there is a legitimate
search among young people today
for some positive alternatives to
military sei'vice. Some of them
don't want to be part of something
that is killing other people."
He is impressed, by the recent
efforts of Students for Democratic
Society and their recent Commun-
ity Action projects. Peace Corps
officials have already had a pro-
ductive meeting with SDS lead-
ers. "We exchanged ideas on com-
munity development noting that
both organizations have discovered
the basic necessity of living under
the same conditions as the people
they are trying to help," Satin
explains.
Makes Sense
Discussing his Selective Service
plan further, Satin notes: "It may
be one way to make some sense
out of the Great Society legislative
package. The Great Society has
called for tremendous inputs of
manpower, perhaps this would be
one way of organizing that man-
power.
"In some ways it would repre-
sent a "wedding" among the Of-
fice of, Economic Opportunity
(Head Start, Job Corps, VISTA
etc.) with its domestic program;
the Peace Corps with its overseas
program; and the Defense Depart-
ment with its military program.
I've never seen a three way wed-
ding but it might be a new ap-
proach." ,
Satin also notes that until re-
cent months the Marines, Air
Force and Navy were able to ful-
fill their manpower needs without
drafting men. Moreover the Peace
Corps currently needs up to 10,000
additional volunteers for programs
in 46 countries. Hence the plan
might make for a more equitable
distribution of manpower.
iBy way of contrast he points out

that while the total Peace Corps
budget was $110 million last year,
military efforts in the Dominican
Republic so far this year have
cost the United States over $60
million alone.
As one young corpsmen put it:
"I'd rather spend my life trying
to help people than looking down
a gun barrel at them."
ICC Requests
'U' Land on
North Campus
(Continued from Page 1)
ing up to the level of dormitories
or apartments.
In the fall of 1957, the ICC with
the aid of the United States Na-
tional Student Association and the
North American Student Coopera-
tive League persuaded Senator
Kuchel (D-Calif.) and Senator
Douglas (R-Ill.) to sponsor legis-
lation that would amend the Col-
lege Housing Act of 1950 and 1955
to make student cooperative asso-
ciations eligible for long-term,
low-interest loans. This legislation
was introduced in the summer of
1958, but it died in committee.
The amendment was passed in
1959, but a clause inserted in the
act made it necessary for the edu-
cational institution where the co-
operative was located to co-sign
any loans made through the Col-
lege Housing Act.
In 1964, the . College Housing
Act was again amended. This new
legislation prohibited the State of
Michigan from co-signing any
loan to the ICC under the College1
Housing Act, and opened the pos-
sibility that the ICC could obtain
a loan for the construction of
their co-op faculty on North
Campus.

By LINDA WALZER
Richard Wagner's r o m a n t i c
opera "Lohengrin" will be pre-
sented in Hill Auditorium at 8
p.m. today through Friday. This
will be the first stage performance
of this work in Ann Arbor, and
the second production of a Wag-
nerian work by the Opera De-
partment of the School of Music.
Stage director for the perform-
ance will be Prof. Ralph Herbert
of the music school, who recently
directed "Lohengrin" at the Met-
ropolitan Opera in New York City
and Fort Worth. Prof. Josef Blatt,
director of opera production, who
has conducted this opera frequent-
ly in European opera houses, is
the musical director. He has frans-
* 1

latd Wagner's original German
lyrics into English.
Prof. Blatt said "Lohengrin" is
considered the first of Wagner's
works to show the musical and
dramatic style of the composer in
its full realization. He added that
this opera has been a favorite in
all countries.
He believes that the melodic
charm and the dramatic impact
of the work are as appealing to-
day as they were at its premiere
115 years ago.
483-4680
Entan" ow CARPENTER ROAD
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Blatt said it "took an especially . Elsa, the heroine, is played by
lucky constellation of talent" to Noel Rodgers, '66, on Wednesday
make the production possible, for, and Friday nights, and by Lynda
although the vocal demands on the Weston, '67, on Thursday night.
cast are less than in most Wag- Ortrud is played by Marilyn
nerian music, they are still very Krimm, an alumna, on Wednes-
formidable. day and Friday nights, and Mar-
Main characters include: Lohen- tha Ecclestone, '67, on Thursday.
grin, played by Kenneth Schef- Theo ~Alcantarilla, A lecturer in
fell, a doctoral candidate; Telra- opera and assistant to Prof. Blatt,
mund, played by Lee Davis, Grad, will conduct on Friday night. In
and the King, played by Daniel the pit will be the 65 member
Jackson, '66. University Chamber Orchestra.
Starts Sa1rs

DIAL 5-6290
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"AN ABSOLUTE KNOCKOUT OF A MOVIE!'
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ROMAN POLANSK'S
starring
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Screenplay by ROMAN POLANSI and BERARD BRACH
Produced by EUGENE GUTOWSKI

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LAWNCEOUVIEI?' CAROL IYNLEY
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SCR~EENPLAY 8YJDIIN ANDO
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EVELYN PIPER -MUSIC SY PAUL GLASS
PHOTOGRAPHED IN PANA VISION
PRODUCED'AND DIRECTED BY DIMJ PREMINGEi
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COMING FRIDAY

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LAST TIMES THIS SEASON

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YOU CANT
TAKE IT
WITH YOU
by
GEORGE S. KAUFMAN
and MOSS HART
The classic
American comedy!
Directed by
Ellis Rabb

THE
WILD DUCK,
by
HENRIK IBSEN
A neuw version
of the poignant drama
Directed by
Stephen Porter

HERAKLES
by ARCHIBALD MACLEISH
The Pulitzer Prize
playwright's provocative
new play
Directed by
Alan Schneider
Set Designer: James Tiltoo

0

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I costume Designer: Nancy POttS
7KRIIPP'S LAST TAPt
~by M UBCKETT

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