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November 02, 1965 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1965-11-02

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 2, 1965

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

1"AV.F lMR.H,'P

TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 2,1965 THE MICHIGAN DAILY ?~ A f'V TT3l~VI~'

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Elections: Republicans Need Key Wins HUNTER-KILLER TEAMS:
U.S. Jets Bomb Hai
t WAcNTONfMOVN( (P) - 'Re uli-1 Municipalelections in C P lRe hublian challen e from A A Tha ,rincinr .ghl i h,. bl nD I T Phil d lnhiTh.,

noi Missiles;

I

cans hope to launch a nationwide
electoral comeback in off-year
balloting today by capturing the
New York City mayoralty and gov-
ernorships in New Jersey and Vir-
ginia.
Rep. John V. Lindsay's bid to
end two decades of Democratic
domination in New York City ap-
pears to afford the GOP its best
chance of demonstrating renewed
strength after last year's disas-
trous defeat.
Lindsay is running a tight con-
test with Democratic pity Comp-
troller Abraham D. Beame and
with publisher William F. Buck-
ley, Jr., the Conservative party
nominee, also running.

land, Philadelphia, Louisville and
Akron, Ohio, seem to offer the Re-
publicans hope of making inroads
in Democratic big-city strength.
Democrats, however, are strong-
ly favored to win the New Jersey
and Virginia governor's races.
In New Jersey, Democratic Gov.
Richard J. Hughes, 56, seeks a
second four-year term against Re-
publican State Sen. Wayne Du-
mont, Jr., 51.
In Virginia, Lt. Gov. Mills E.
Godwin, Jr., 50, seeks to succeed
retiring Democratic Gov. Albertis
S. Harrison, Jr. against a strong

Linwood Holton, 42.
Legislatures are being elected
also in New Jersey, Virginia and
New York. Kentucky is filling
some seats. In the only congres-
sional race, Republican Clarence
J. Brown, Jr. is favored to win
the seat of his late father in
Ohio's strongly Republican '7th
District against Democrat James
A. Berry.
In New Jersey, Democrats hopes
for a Hughes landslide that will
give them undisputed legislative
control for the first time in half
a century. Republicans contend,
however, that Dumont has been
narrowing the gap and could
spring an upset.
EPce

.L "pr. pac iiJa issuen ass een u-u
mont's attack on Rutgers Uni-
versity Prof. Eugene T. Genovese,
who said last spring he welcomed
a Viet Cong victory in Viet Nam.
In Virginia, Godwin's major
problem has been the entry into
the contest of Conservative party
nominee William J. Story. Repub-
licans are counting on Story to
draw off enough Democrats to
give Holton, an attorney, a chance
for an upset.
In Cleveland, Republican Coun-
ty Auditor Ralph J. Perk is fac-
ing three Democrats: Mayor Ralph
S. Locher, Negro State Rep. Carl
B. Stokes and school board mem-
ber Ralph McAllister. Locher is
favored.

n n Uaaepa, Repubians are
running a former Democrat, Ar-
len Specter, for district attorney
against incumbent Democrat
James C. Crumlish, Jr.
In Louisville, GOP Alderman
Kenneth Schmeid hopes to be-
come the second straight GOP
mayor after 28 straight years of
Democratic control. His opponent
is University of Louisville Law
School Dean Marlin Volz.
In Akron, home town of GOP
National Chairman Ray C. Bliss,
Republican John S. Ballard is try-
ing to be the first GOP mayor
in 12 years. His Democratic op-
ponent is Ray C. Sheppard, law
director under retiring Democrat-
ic Mayor Edward O. Erickson.

Destroy Three Sites in Raid

Sukarno

Central

SAIGON (/)-United States Air
Force and Navy jets-some oper-
ating as new "hunter-killer" teams
-- silenced three surface-to-air
missile sites Sunday in the air de-
fense ring set up by Russians
around Hanoi, North Viet Nam's
capital.
Pilots reporting yesterday on the
strikes said they left one site in
ruins and knocked the two others
out of action in 20 minutes de-
spite heavy missile and conven-
tional anti-aircraft fire 35 miles
northeast of Hanoi.
Ironically, small arms fire
knocked down one U.S. Navy jet
and a U.S. spokesman said the
pilot was presumed captured after
bailing out.
Hunter-Killer Teams
One of the hunter-killer teams,
working on an experimental basis
to seek out and destroy missile
sites in the North, was credited
with knocking out two of the
sites, said Capt. Michael P. Coop-
er, Cocoa Beach, Fla. Three Navy
jets from the U.S. 7th Fleet car-
rier Oriskany knocked out the
third.
The groups were formed follow-
ing the shooting down of a sixth
U.S. plane by Soviet-supplied mis-
siles, called SAM's, over North

Viet Nam last Wednesday.
Cooper said the hunter-kill
groups accompany bombing plane
striking at targets within Nort
Viet Nam.
He said a U.S. Navy A-4 Sky
hawk was the pathfinder for tw
of the groups, and signaled 1
them when SAM sites were locat
ed. The two sites were about eigl
to 12 miles west of the bridge un
der attack, Cooper said.
Within 20 minutes, all thr
SAM sites were out of action an
the 280-foot bridge was down i
the river, the pilots said.
U.S. planes started hitting mic
sile sights after the SAM's bag
ged their first American plan

several months ago. On July 27,
er U.S. planes knocked out one mo-
es bile missile launching site and
h damaged another 40 miles north-
east of Hanoi.
Y- Ground Action
Vo Aground in South Viet Nam, a
to force of the U.S. 1st Cavalry Di-
t- vision, Airmobile, killed 50 enemy
ht troops in the area of the Plei
- Me special forces camp that bat-
tled off heavy Communist attacks
ee last week. A U.S. spokesman said
d there were no U.S. casualties.
n At Da Nang, Viet Cong guerrillas
made two night probes against
s- U.S. Marine positions but were
g- beaten off, a Marine spokesman
ae reported.

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Wins Time
For Peace
Settlement
Wilson Talks Tough
With Smith, Africans
On Rhodesian Crisis
LONDON (P)-Prime Minister
Harold Wilson yesterday claimed
to have won time for a peaceful
settlement of independence-seek-
ing Rhodesia's future based on
eventual African majority rule.
Reporting to the House of Com-
mons on his 13,000-mile journey
to Africa, Wilson said important
differences remain but he could
not believe Rhodesia will embark
on a policy of "dangerous lunacy."
Wilson disclosed he had pulled
no punches in talking with the
white rulers of the colony and
with their African opponents.
To Prime Minister Ian Smith'
and his all-white government, Wil-
son said, he had uttered no threats
if they tried to seize independence
without' Britain's consent. But
there were warnings of what Brit-
ain would do, what the United
Nations might do, and of actions
African states might take.
To Joshua Nkomo, N. A. Sithole
and other Rhodesian African na-
tionalist leaders, Wilson related,
he was equally tough. No thun-
der bolt in the shape of the Royal
Air Force, would come hurtling
from the skies to end white rule,
and to impose African rule.
And although Britain is "deeply
and irrevocably committed" to
work toward majority rule it
won't be coming today or tomor-
row, he said, adding that time and
patience are needed for passions
to cool and for the races to work
and live together.
In a crowded, hushed chamber
Wilson revealed that twice in the
past 10 days Smith's Rhodesian
government was on the brink of
breaking with Britain.
The first occasion was after
Smith had sent him a letter Oct.
20-a letter resembling an ulti-
matum, Wilson said-in which he
demanded immediate independ-
ence. But Rhodesian action was
staved off only by Wilson's rush-
ed flight to.Salisbury to keep talks
going.
The second occasion was Oct.
29 when his exchanges with Smith
had reached the point of collapse.
But crisis again was averted by
Wilson's proposal for the appoint-
ment of a royal commission charg-
ed with the task of hammering
out an agreed new independence
constitution which all Rhodesians
could accept.
Essentially the projected royal
commission of three members-
under chairmanship of Rhodesia's
Chief Justice Sir Hugh Beadle-
is a time-borrowing device offer-
ing the London and Salisbury gov-
ernments a framework in which to
keep their dialogue going.

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Confirms

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1965 GALA BALL
NOV. 12 ... 8:30
Union Ballroom
MAXIMILIAN BAND

.I

Army Drive
In Jakarta
Dispatches Indicate
Civil War Brewing
SINGAPORE (P)-President Su-
karno of Indonesia has proclaim-
ed martial law in central Java,
Jakarta-radio said yesterday. Thus
he at last apparently sided with
the army's anti-Communist drive
there.
Jakarta radio said Sukarno sign-
ed the order that in effect con-
firms an army directive of last
week setting up a form of Jnar-
tial law in central Java, where
the Communists are strong.
The broadcast said Sukarno as-
serted he was compelled to de-
clare the area in a state of war
because of the situation. He also
proclaimed martial law in the
greater Jakarta area, the radio
added.
Grave Danger
Jakarta radio said Sukarno de-
clared he had taken the action
because of the "grave danger"
arising from the pro-Communist
coup attempt Oct. 1.
Dispatches from Jakarta have
indicated the situation in central
Java is approaching that of full-
scale civil war.
Brig. Gen. Surfo Sumpeno, mil-
itary commander in central Java,
was quoted yesterday as saying
the situation is "increasingly ser-
ious" around Surakarta. He ac-
cused Communist youths of
spreading terror in Surakarta and
said army units are pursuing
them.
Youth Wing
In Kuala Lumpur, the Malay-
sian government radio which mon-
itors Indonesian broadcasts, said
Indonesian government forces had
repulsed major attacks, by 500
members of the Communist par-
ty's youth wing in central Java.
The rebels are known to have
fled to central and east Java after
the army smashed the coup at-
tempt in Jakarta.
Sukarno, in his radio statement,
said he had appointed the com-
mander of the Diponegoro divi-
sion, which patrols central Java,
commander in central Java. Some
elements of the division first sup-
ported the rebel movement but
most units appear now to be pro-
government.
The Indonesia army-controlled
Antara news agency said several
leaders of the Communist party,
its youth wing, and Sobsi, the
Communist trade union, were cap-
tured in east Java. It reported the
army was intensifying mopup op-
erations there.

INTERNATIONAL 1MAGE:

Spotlight Af
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LECTURE WEDNE
8 P.M.I
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Presentation of U of M African Club

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SDAY, NOV. 10
UNION RM. 3B

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World News Roundup
- - - - - - -

E

By The Associated Press
WASHINGTON - Release of
some of the government's big
aluminum stockpile was consid-
ered yesterday after an industry
announcement of plans to raise
the price of the metal.,
President Johnson ordered the
White House review Sunday from
his Texas ranch. The President
was pictured by some sources here
as angered by the proposed price
increase of half a cent a pound
while the government is holding
1.4 million tons of surplus alumin-
um.
Officials said $250-million worth
of aluminum ingots could be re-
leased immediately by presidential
order, and an addition'al $450-
million worth could be freed by
congressional action.
Any such large-scale release of

government supplies would be
bound to have an effect on the
domestic price picture. The metal
has been selling for about 24.5
cents a pound.
* * *
CAIRO - An attempted coup
d'etat in Iraq last Friday was
crushed by President Abdel Salam
Aref, reliable Iraqi sources here
reported yesterday. They said
about 30 army officers were ar-
rested.
The officers, the informants
added, attempted a coup in the
early morning and tried to seize
some key posts in Baghdad but
surrendered when overpowered by
government forces which appar-
ently discovered the attempt in
time.
The Iraqi informants said the
group of rebel officers advocated
immediate unity between Iraq and

the United Arab Republic.
WASHINGTON-The State De-
partment admonished Israel yes-
terday for its raids on Lebanese
villages Oct. 28-29 and asked both
countries to cooperate with the
United Nations in keeping the
peace.
Commenting on what.Israel de-
scribed as retaliatory raids, State
Department officials said that we
cannot condone the resorts to re-
taliatory raids, and that retalia-
tory raids will only increase ten-
sions and make the task of the
more difficult.

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To the readers and admirers of
Atlas Shrugged and
The Fountainhead
Nathaniel Branden's
recorded lectures on
Objectivism
the philosophy of
AYN
RAND
and its application to psychology

GUILD HOUSE
802 MONROE
Tuesday, November 2
7-8:30 PM.
Seminar "THE SECULAR CITY"

W. W. Cook Lectures on American Institutions
Ascendancy of
American Liberalism
By DR. LESLIE W. DUNBAR
Director of the Field Foundation

ii *
P
t.

WITH REV. J. EDGAR EDWARDS

"Public Policy and the
Art of Peace Making
Tuesday, Nov. 2

1
G' - ,

TREMENDOUS SELECTIONS
IN CASUAL SUITS ...
SHETLAND, HEATHERS,
HERRINGBONES, AND PLAIDS
IN SIZES 6 TO 16

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