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November 02, 1965 - Image 2

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1965-11-02

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PAGE TWO

THE MICHIGAN 'DAILY

TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 2, 1965

7ROUP Wants New

HOUPCrantssew
Hour-Credit System

SGC AND STUDENT:
REACH Seeks More Contact

(Continued from Page 1) codification of goals in terms of campus within the next two weeks.
(Continued from Page 1) gitimate function of SOC is to tion through liasons with student short, medium and long range DeJong further stated "the seat-
voice its support in cases of aca- organizations including graduate projects. For instance, we would ing of our candidates in the com-
ing improvements would bring vieisspoti ae faa raiain n n r like to see the proposed student! ing election, while important, is
persons with training and inter- demic freedom and freedom of and international groups. Coupled lik tose tepropoed stdent ucelecto whe importntgis
est in student academic welfare speech which affect the entire with this, they would like to em- book store approached in a stage not crucial to the functioning of
esdntoy haieaporm rnigfeh development plan, without neg- Reach. That is, we' can operate as
into this area. GROUP would al- tudnt dymen and sophomoresrintothe co lecting the Student Book Exchange a research-public relations organ
so bring about a re-evaluation of Last Spring mittee structure of SGC, by send- and with sensitivity toward the for SGC regardless of the outcome
the present credit-hour system. GROUP is an organization that ing speakers from the University Regents' Bylaws and other govern- of the election."
According to Robinson, a more first appeared on campus last Activities Center and from S-C to ing bodies." Express Interests Clearly
equitable solution would be to base spring during the SGC elections housing units as a follow up to Reach has been a student or- DeJong continued, "I believe
hour accreditation by course-level at that time. "GROUP was form- freshman orientation. They hope ganization since Oct. 21. It now the campaign headquarters will
difficulty rather than hours of ed to motivate SGC to fulfill its to institute an accredited leader- has a membership of 99. Reach enable students to express their
cla s atendaconsideringpropos-biions and nesentin ent ship course in the University. has contacted the leaders of 57 interests more clearly. Here they
zGROUP elisinaconiderigrdesaopsiniconsmandtyndton-tcdemniCodification of Goals recognized student organizations. can obtain literature on SGC and
ing the elimination of grades, at sity community and non-academic According to Reach Vice-Presi- and has set up liasons with these Reach. Also, Reach candidates will
let i e proposed residenti world, and to effectively press for dent Russell N. DeJong, '67, "The groups. Reach aspires to contact be available at the headquarters at
cleeanthegrninnofcreditth fulfilmento, organization is working toward a the presidents of housing units on all times to answer questions."
.4~ 4-.An..4-. 4~vnlnA4,,nn, ni

ours co s bueni snvoJveU in cer-
tain campus activities.
'U' Policy
* University Policy: The exer-
cise of in loco parentis by the 'U'
should be relaxed. Specifically,
sophomore women could be given
permission to live in apartments.
The issue of curfew hours for
freshman women should be sub-
mitted to a referendum vote by
the freshman women students.
* Outside Political Affairs: Ac-
cording to Robinson, GROUP con-
siders SGC as a representative of
the student body that presents
students' views to the outside
world. Therefore, he said, the le-

Robinson said.
Robinson p o i n t e d to past
achievements of GROUP as bear-
ing out their effectiveness in ac-
complishing their stated aims.
The four bookstore committee
chairmen are all GROUP mem-
bers, he said. During the summer
they'compiled a 13-page document
on the bookstore situation in Ann
Arbor and the rationale behind
the asking for a University-spon-
sored discount bookstore.
The bookstore committee this
fall launched a petition campaign
which gathered 13,000 signatures
in support of the bookstore pro-
posal.

Spanish Harpsichordist Proves
Baroque Music Can Be Exciting

1V

POZNAN CHOIR:
Singers Perform
In Polish Tradition

By LUCY KENNEDY
/ The Poznan Choir, appearing
here tonight, represents 500 years
of Polish history as well as being
one of the finest male choruses
in Europe.
The choir began in the Poznan
Church about .1450 and was made
up of boys who were students at
the cathedral and men from the
Vicar's° College. In the eighteenth
century, women took over the
boys' parts; but at the time of
the Prussian invasion, Josef Sur-
zynski re-established the, original
form of the choir and set about
preserving Polish music. The choir
continued through World War I
and toured the ravaged areas of
Poland.
War Years
The invasion of Poland in 1939
and the sudden imprisonment' of
the Poznan Choir's Director, Dr.
Waclaw Gieburowski, apparently
put an end to the echoir which
had become a symbol of Polish
tradition. A nineteen-year-old
choir member, Stefan Stuligrosz,'
the present lirector and conductor,
found sixteen boys and eight men
with whom he formed new
group..
During the entire Geerman oc-
cupation, he worked with ,this
group in secret,, holding. classes
and rehearsals in:, hidden cellars
and attics. He also organized se-
cret concerts for his fellow coun-
trymen which were held as part
of the religious services in the two
churches which Poles were still
permitted to attend.
After the liberation, Stuligrosz
continued his work, expanding the
choir to the fifty boys and twenty-
five men that make up the present
choir.

holidays, the Poznan Choir School,
under the direction of Professor
Leodegarde Schechtel, receives
about 300 applications. Only fif-
teen boys are selected from this
group. Selections are made on the
basis of difficult examinations
which test the candidate's regular
academic accomplishment as well
as his vocal ability and his basic
musical potential. If he is lucky
enough to be chosen, he then is
admitted to a series of classes at
the school.
For one year he studies the
reading of music, attends seminars
in voice- training and begins a
study of the repertoire of Geor-
gian and Polish music. When he
has completed his training period,
the candidate fills the place of a
departing member (most boys
leave the choir when they are
about fifteen) and becomes an
official choir member.
Competition Strong
Although there is less turn over
in the men's parts of the choir,~
new boys have to be taken in each
year, and the competition is very
strong. Frequently, a boy who
leaves Poland a soprano returns a
baritone. Stuligrosz believes that
as soon as a boy's voice starts to
change, he should stop singing so
he will not strain his vocal chords.
The choir, is presently subsi-
dized by the Ministry of Art and
Culture and between 1960 and
1961 toured behinId the Iron Cur-
tain in Romania and Bulgaria
and then in France. The choir
made its initial appearance in
Berlin in 1951 and has toured
Europe each year with enormous
success. The choir last appeared
in the United States in 1963. I

By JEFFREY K. CHASE
Why not more recitals?
Do the arts have to succumb to
large scale display to be good?
Spanish harpsichordist Rafael
Puyana proved Sunday evening
that even with very modest per-
forming means, music can still
be very exciting.
To ears raised in the classic-
romantic tradition, the music of
the Baroque may at first sound
uninspired, overly calm or lacking
in variety. Upon close listening,
however, one can detect what
little gems these keyboard works
really are. It's refreshing to hear
music by Frescobaldi, Sweelinck,
Chambonnieres, Louis Couperin,
Sol'er and D. Scarlatti.
Played Well
Puyana played well, but pre-
sented problems: first, one might
challenge the authenticity of his
harpischord sound. In the Baro-
que, harpsichords weren't equip-
ped with the variety of coloristic
FREE to the first 20 Ladies at each
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devices which Puyana's Pleyel (a
new instrument used Sunday for
the first time in this country)
possesses.
He made the most of the color
shadings of lute, harp, and reedy
sounds which the musical purists
would find insulting. They would
say that the music was not writ-
ten to sound that way and no
performer should play it so!
Twentieth century harpsichord
music, written with this type of
instrument in mind, is one case;
old music written for a less rigged
harpsichord, they would say, is
another.
Modernists
To satisfy the modernists (pro-
gressives?), Puyana's use of the

effects was clever and served to
highlight the contrast in the mu-
sic.
The second problem is Puyana's
consistency of quality playing.
When he played well, he played
very well. But when he didn't
play so well, notes were missed
and rhythm faltered. When re-
cording, of course, these momen-
tary slips, no matter how num-
erous, can be dubbed, but a live
performance is a one shot deal
and mistakes show through.
Puyana came from Europe with
a harpsichord, much music and
the reputation of being the suc-
cessor to the late, great Wanda
Landowska. Perhaps Sunday was
just an off night.

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DIAL 662-6264

* ENDS TODAY *
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"NEVER ON SUNDAY"

WEDNESDAY
MOST DRAMATIC MOTION PICTURE!

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AN EVENING TO CHERISH!I
Mounting joy beyond anything you might expect. Radiant!"
W. TELEGRAM
"THE TOUCH OFGREATNESSI
A warm portrayal of Robert Frost,an evening when the poet spins out his own
story,the sweet and the following bitter,the tragedy and triumph, in words
creating laughter, but even more often tears."
N. Y. TIMES
"MAGNIFICENTI MEMORABLE MAGIC."
CUE
"FROST'S TRUE VOICE SPEAKS IN ALL ITS LYRIC CLARITY.'
HERALD TRIBUNE

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,*

LIMITED ENGAGEMENT
Judith Rutherford Marechal Prod, In. & Konrad Matthaei/

I

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.sent The University of Michga
Professional Theatre Program
Pr~toi

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w
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eri Evenfn) Fost

By DONLHL
irce yMRCLACSE

tcarrMg Jacqueline
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DlAVIS GEER

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