100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

October 29, 1965 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1965-10-29

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

FRIDAY, OCTOBER 29, 1965

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

w-

--IDAi OCTOBER-29,--965 LAE . t w iAN UAi&.A

IMODERN DANCE:
Greater Freedom Gives
Unique Feeling, Imagery

PAGE SEVEN

By BETSY COHN
The movement of a body
through space in imaginative and
unusual, patterns is the goal and
beauty of modern dancing.
The average person is very un-
aware of the field of modern dance
which took its first big leap in
the '20's. Since that time, dancers
have veered away from the rig-
orous style of ballet in an effort
to make greater use of the torso.
to achieve different leverage with
the body and to experiment with
gravity and resistance to gravity.;
The result of the various contrac-
tions and contortions involved in
these experiments is a unique and
individual interpretation of feel-
ing, rhythm and imagery.
The Ann Arbor Dance Theatre,
sponsored by the Ann Arbor Rec-
reation Department, strives to ac-

quaint people, with modern dance.
This group currently is presenting'
a Modern Dance Workshop which
meets every third Thursday in the
Ann Arbor Public Library. The
performances are free to the pub-
lic. Thursday evening at 8 the
group will dance to poetry recited
and written by Prof. Donald Hall
of the English department. Prof.
Hall will read poetry from which
the individual dancers have drawn
their creations.
It will be a unique performance
for the group because of the prep-
aration the performers will have
before dancing. Usually all work-
shop dances are impromptu; how-
ever, for this workshop four per-
formers will have heard the poetry
prior to their individual interpre-
tations. Each will give an infor-
mal interpretation of the poem's
rhythm, image, feeling and mood.

Varied Media, Textures, Styles
Mark 43rd Annual Art Show
The 43rd annual Ann Arbor Art obliged to carry through in his: ford and "No. 1," an ink drawing
Show, sponsored bye the Ann Ar- painting." by Marge McMahon.
bor Art Association, is displaying It was on this basis as well as The hanging and placement of
its goods on the third, floor of "strength of color and meaning" the show was another work of art
Rackham Hall until Oct. 31. that Mrs. Miles selected the prize in itself, created by Julia Andrews,
Headed by Julia Andrews, the or- winning works. Included in the Upon entering the main door, one
ganization is in its 53rd -year as Special Merits were: "Imaginery looks through three parallel door-
an independent association open Passions for a Tomb" by R. T. ways and is then stopped by "The'
to all interested Washtenaw Coun- Fairfield, a mixture of Van Gogh Meeting" by Miriam Brumer, an
ty citizens. and Halloween in conte crayon, a oil study in blues, greens and yel-
Various media and texture cover lively and tormented piece which lows and oranges whose depth
this ' year's exhibit: gracefully tries desperately to escape from nearly carries one beyond.
pounded and pearlized sterling the canvass; "Potted Planter" by Next to this strong composition
jewelry, embroidered burlap, batik J. T. Abenarthy, a clay life sized is a delicate contrast, "A Drawing
on flannel, hand woven rugs and pot; "Void Hanging No. 3" by of a Baby" by Peggy Venturi, in
ornaments, springs protruding out Jean Beckley, an exciting experi- pencil, pastel and oil. Amidst a
of driftwood called "Jonah," red ment in weaving, original in its large white canvass is a soft pic-
ahd white tablecloths, ,marble- use of material and its combina- torial composition which, accord-
heads, bronze bodies, casserole tion of primitive and modern styl- ing to Mrs. Miles, "conveyed a
pots, plates, pillows, and paintings. ing," said the judge. message of the loneliness of one

BNT-A-CAR
10.50 per weeken
Friday noon-Monday noon plus mileage.

We rent to students

19 years and older.

FREE PICK-UP and DELIVERY
ECON-'O-CAB
66 -2033

SAM'S STORE
Has LEVI'S galore
for gals and guys
LEVI'S Slimfits

I

These paintings also come in
various medium: splashy oil,
yawning water colors, daring acry-
lic and confused collages. Impres-
sive intricate collections of toilet
paper, rhinestones, felt balls, and
gravel are given titles such as
"Broken Jar"' and "Grandpa's
Dream Girls."
"I was the jury for the show,
and am also the artrdepartment
for Highland Park - College," said
Mrs. Cyril Miles. Mrs. Miles spoke
of the singularity of art as an ex-
pression, stating "there is a.singu-
larity of commitment an artist is

Other Special Merit winners
were: "Singing of Summer" by
Ellen Bonar Wilt, which sings a
vibrantly green and blue tune and
was selected for its "excellence in
design, brilliant color and human
appeal"; and "Los Angeles U.S.A."
by Eugene Smith, another glim-
mering shimmering water color
which captures the exciting, in-
viting city lighting.
Honorable Mentions
Honorable Mentions were award-
ed to "The Enchanted Forest," a
water color design by Alice Craw-

thrust into the world."
Bathroom Scene
Also integrated into the display
grounds was a center section cur-
iously reminscient of a bathroom
scene: tapestry hanging from the
wall at the foot of which is a
fluffy okra colored rug with pink
and orange stars; throw pillows
and various plates and bottles:
adjacent to this is the prize win-
ning pot by J. T. Abenarthy.
The overall impression received
by this reporter was a collection
of bright synthetic colors and
clever technique' which appear
appetizing, are easy to swallow but
have a disturbingly small amount
of substance.t

The Stroh Brewery Company, Detroit 26, Michigan
What fire, and Qjl fire does for food...m
fire does for Stroh's4
and o* yStroh~

N ATIONAL SURVEY:
Educators Find Protestors
Small Minority of Students

I

"White"

and

i

fivecolors..$4.25
LEVI'S S-t-re-t-c-h $5.98,
LEVI'S Sta-Prest

all colors....

$6.98

Sta-Prest
Corduroy
JACKETS.

. .. $7.98
$5.49

COTTON TURTLE NECK
"T" SH IRTS .. $1.69
15 COLORS

(ContinuedfromPage1)
May Second Movement, Students
for a Democratic Society and the
Humanist Society.
Louis Hekhuis, director of stu-
dent affairs at MSU, said, "My
personal, unofficial estimate of the
strength of this entire movement
is less than one per cent of the
student body-and I'll go even
lower if pressed."
MembershipRoster
roster of any of these groups you'll
find members of some of the
others," he said.
.The university has an' enroll-
ment of 35;000 students.
Charles McClure, associate dean
of students at UCLA, Los Angeles,
said, "There are 15 to 20 people
who run all the protest groups and
are the sole members. They have
a very, very small following in
terms of their absolute position,
but a -large following in that
people are interested in any issue."
Insuffifient Dedication
McClure said he did not think
,more, than 100, students among
.I

4

OVER 2000 PAIRS OF LEVI'S IN STOCK

the more than 20,000 would be
sufficiently dedicated to hold a
protest sign or make a speech.
At .Stanford University at Palo
Alto, Calif., two protest groups
are active; the Medical Aid Com-
mittee for Viet Nam and the May
Second Movement.
"As near as we can tell, about
20 students form the hard core of
both groups," said a campus
spokesman. He said the majority
of Stanford's 11,000 students are
in the "middle of the road."
The largest of the protest dem-
onstrations two weeks ago origi-
nated at the University of Cali-.
fornia campus at Berkeley. A uni-
versity spokesman, who declined
to be named, said only about
200 to 300 of the 27,000 students
are involved in the movements.
"It is the general belief that a
not very large percentage of the
marchers actually were students,",
he said.
Berkeley Activity
On the Berkeley campus only
two groups have announced pub-
lic opposition to U.S. involvement
in Viet Nam : Viet Nam Day and
the May Second Movement.
The protest group most fre-
quently named by college officials
is the Students for a Democratic
Society. At Vanderbilt University
in Nashville, the society was dis-
solved on grounds that it, was
impossible to carry out the na-
tional policies under the Vander-
bilt framework.!
Jarold Keiffer, assistant to the
president of the University of
Oregon at Eugene, said only a
small percentage of the 12,200
students are involved. "I get the
feeling," he said, "we have more
faculty than students active in
the protest movement."

i

SAM'S STORE

DEPENDABLE
IMPORT SERVICE.
We have the MECHANICS
and the PARTS.
NEW CAR DEALER
Triumph --Volvo-
Fiat-Checker
We lease cars
as low as $4.50
per 24-hr. day.
HERB ESTES
AUTOMART
319 W. Huron 665-3688

I[ I

r

122 E. Washington

Open Monday & Friday :Nights

MAKE SURE YOU
DON'T MISS THAT
IMPORTANT
PHONE CALL!
'elephone answering service is now
within reach of every residential
phone! New, low rates based on
actual hours you use your answer-
ing service each month makes this
possible. Once you are connected to
the answering service, you just call
our answering service operatorowhen
you go out for dinner, class, or for
the weekend and she takes all your
calls while you are away. The fol-
lowing low monthly rates are based
on the average hours per day you
use the service:
2 hours per day or less-only $8
2 to 4 hours per dcy-only $14
4 to 6 hours per day-only $16
6 to 8 hours per day-only $18
24 hours per doy--only $22

A

I-

a

No other American beer is fire-
brewed. Only Stroh's. And why?,
Reason's simple. What the touch of
fire does for fine, prime beef.. . . fire
does for the flavor of Stroh's. Brewing
over direct fire gets better flavor out of
the ingredients and puts it into the beer.

That's the traditional Old World way to
brow fine beer. You can taste the differ-
ence. Try Stroh's. Just once. Then, no
matter what beer you've been drinking,
chances are you'll switch to Stroh's.
That's because Stroh's is the only
American beer with fire-brewed flavor.

VIET NAM FORUM

A VIETNAMESE VIEW
of the WAR
5 South Vietnamese students to discuss

Cori 665-8657
For Your Service To Begin!

FIRE-BREWED FLAVOR

AAA ANSWERING SERVICE, INC.
106 East Liberty

IF

-

U.S. presence

in Viet Nam.

4 P.M, Friday, Oct. 29

'Small Turn Out
At Washington & Lee University
at Lexington, Va., a hand-lettered
sign was posted two weeks ago
calling for anti-Viet Nam pro-
tests.
But no one showed up and a
student leader said, "This sort of
thing doesn't have any student
support at all."
In another development, two cri-
tics of both sides in the Viet Nam
war met here to assist in planning
"March on Washington" Nov. 27
to "help mobilize the conscience
of America."
Among other things, the march
leaders want both sides to cease
fighting and they say that "no
party to the conflict, the United
States included, has done all it
can to bring about negotiations."
1

.0 istration

i

UGL Multipurpose Room
Uac-SGC

0

dS

toda

I

YOUR ARE INVITED TO ATTEND THE
Canadian-American Relations
Seminar
NOV. 3, 4, 5, at the UNIVERSITY OF WINDSOR

.., .._ .s ..............': :'::.'::.:.1 :.. .....:. .....{: :."::::.::t .. J.7:".........t ...,: rr ...... r, ....:.:..,.. " ti"":"Y .. ,,,,,r."V .::': JS:"V: "r,': "::: :+rJ .".r.:Trr':+,L...r ,: r: r:'""J.
..L., ..:.......G.. r.}".: .."J.r.."."}:? ".:" . y {'.v7::r..",rr":. rs:: W''4.".. r: w: w rn"}r rL.. {..; ,L ., .. yA.. r{ ,v:..,".. 7..
:"r . x' r. .v. J. r.
.. ra .,,«..,.....oaw,,...LY:L"..".".,:nk.,,.a ."r..:a."sr'r: re:.LS::S{"aM1 ra"::. n....: a"7:. rF"..,..:": i{::: :L:" L".+r «:":ti:v ..,$"S":"F+ {: o....."v:7 '. . ..,
FOR 'ELIECITIO
iNS
.L xr Lv:." " " m."."rrr vL^ "r+ v': " . .1 1.. .".^rlr
..4 brr.:Qs:"".v: xn, . J""S"S:".v i".",.r' }"rvv:." r:Jr.".1c":{o":":v}iii:{Gi:i :"ri::!"X<":.
..-7.L...ti:":: r . 1 J.
."r....L . r, l"rr F "r. ! . J. V.
.,. .. . {{":': -rJ""""L. ". , r""",i':".." . r.L.,O...., ,r..,n.,":P,..,:if,.. .. ,N ., " \ { . rF .1M.S . . ... ...... .. .... ...............
r ..' . v S.r.. $.1.. J$: "r.L077::,r , ..r.L"S.b. a L:>"7P. J,. S1{"7.{":rr.L"Y.4'r 7"i?:"'"' , .. :.n{" ..

SPEAKING:

HARRY JOHNSON, new chancellor of The London School of Economics &
Political Science: Wed., Nov. 3 at 8:30

KS

i

BARRY BLUESTONE. saeakina on Financial Aid To The University

11 . I

I

II

I

I

I

..., . ... tea. r e f iiw . f r.. i i. arse 1.. f

Back to Top

© 2017 Regents of the University of Michigan