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October 29, 1965 - Image 6

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1965-10-29

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PAGE SIX

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

FRIDAY, OCTOBER 2g, I965

PAGE SIX THE MICHIGAN DAILY FRIDAY. OCTOBER 29. l9~5

+.. sw.araa.. vv+v.+a.av rrv avvu

I.

Expect De Gaulle

To Seek Re-Election '

By The Associated Press Although he kept a close watch'
PARIS-Gen. Charles de Gaulle, fr.m the wings, de Gaulle was of-
who once gave up his power, has ficially off the political scene 12
promised to tell the nation by years. He was recalled in 1958
early November whether he will during the Algerian crisis.
be a candidate for re-election in May Retire
December. De Gaulle will be 75 Nov. 22.
Most Frenchmen expect the an- He could decide he had earned re-

swer to be yes. Several papers re-
cently said he had made up his
mind to seek another seven-year
term.
Most of those convinced that he
will run, like to leave the door
just a little bit open. Unpredict-
ability has been a de Gaulle hall-
mark.
'46 Resignation
In 1946 he resigned as head of
the provisional postwar govern-
ment because he didn't like a
constitution adopted against his
will. He said it wouldn't work. It
didn't, in part because de Gaulle
had enough supporters in Parlia-
ment to keep successive govern-
ments in constant turmoil.
BEST DEALS ON '66
Mustangs-Falcons-Fords
USED CARS-ALL MAKES
SEE OR CALL
JOHN HARRISON
at
Henderson Ford Soles, 662-3261

tirement.
His wife, Yvonne, would love"
that. She longs to flee the restric-]
tive formality of the Elysee Pal-'
ace for the rustic simplicity of
their country home at Colombey
les deux Eglises.+
Among his contemporaries, he
has seen Winston Churchill tight-'
ly embraced by England in crisis,j
then turned out of office when1
the crisis had passed. West Ger-+
man Chancellor Konrad Adenauer1
was pushed out of office by his
own party, and never seemed able:
to understand he wasn't wanted.,
De Gaulle would never want his1
image tarnished by a historical ac-l
cident or an unavoidable shift in
public opinion.s
Criticizes PetainI
In his memoirs, de Gaulle de-
cried the fact that, at the age of
84, Marshal Philippe Petain signed
the armistice halting the fight-{
ing between France and Hitler'st
Germany.t
"Odd age is a shipwreck," de
Gaulle commented.1
If he decides to take another
seven-year term, he will be 82'

when that term expires.
De Gaulle has appeared strong1
and firm of voice in recent public1
appearances. He had a major
operation for removal of a pros-,
tate tumor in April 1964 and seem-
ed to recover quickly.!
Guided by Aide
He disdains eyeglasses in public,
but an aide keeps close by to warn,
him of steps or unfamiliar ob-
stacles.
De Gaulle's memory has let him
down on relatively minor items
during at least two of his semi-
annual news conferences. He care-
fully memorizes the discourse he
intends to make and is able to
talk for almost an hour, reciting
complicated figures without a bob-
ble.
But on one occasion, an aide
had to remind him of a commentj
he wanted to make. Another time,,
two official "clarifications" had to '
be issued the following day.
De Gaulle's supporters consider
any reasons cited for his retire-
ment as only minor, negative argu-
ments.
Details CareerI
At his September news confer-I
ence, de Gaulle detailed how manyl
cabinet meetings he had attend-I
ed, how many times he had re-1
ceived individual ministers, am-t
bassadors and foreign chiefs of
state. Some interpreted this as a
swan song. Others saw it as proofs

that he is in constant consulta-
tion and as refutation of charges
that he makes decisions all alone.
If de Gaulle were to seep aside,
a propoganda buildup would be
needed for a hand-picked succes-
sor. Premier Georges Pompidou
seems the most likely heir-ap-
rparent, but there has been no
sign of any unusual effort to sell
Pompidou to the nation.
De Gaulle obviously does not
think that his program has been
completely achieved.
Spurns EEC
French representatives at the
European Common Market head-
quarters in Brussels, Belgium,
were called home in July. France
has since refused to take part
in any negotiations. De Gaulle is
fearful of threat of supranation-
alism and a loss of the French
veto.
The French attitude has been
that nothing can be done before
the presidential election.
The same is true for the North
Atlantic Treaty Organization. Last'
month, de Gaulle said "in 1969,'
by the latest, the subordination
known as integration which is
provided for by NATO and which
hands our fate over to foreign au-
thorities shall cease, as far as
we are concerned." He said it with
finality, as if he meant to be
around.

4

GEN. CHARLES de GAULLE
On the home front, de Gaulle is
still fighting the French parties
that beat him on the constitution
issue in 1964. His aim is the com-
plete effacement of the splint-
ered party system. He has re-
duced the pal ties to impotence.
Another seven years in the poli-
tical wilderness would practically
leave only Gaullist supporters with
a national political image.

-

Blood Donated to Wounded GIs

INSTANT SILENCE
Sound Attenuators as
utilized by military and
commercial jet aircraft
ground crew personnel.
For information check
your book store or
write direct to:
ACADEMIC AIDS
P.O. BOX 969
BERKELEY, CALIF. 94701

F 'U

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 31
and
MONDAY, NOVEMBER 1

ii

*

CAREER PLANNING
VOCATIONAL
APTITUDE TESTING
COUNSELING

WILLIAM

NEW YORK (W)-Thousands of
college students are giving blood
to injured U.S. soldiers in Viet
Nam with Pentagon approval as a
gesture of support for U.S. policies
in Viet Nam.
The junior class at Washington
State University collected 750
pints in three days. Hundreds
more were turned away for health
reasons.
A "bleed-in" is being organized
by the Denver Center of Colorado
University.
"We wanted to show that not
all college students rush around
saying 'no' to everything," said
sophomore Bill Van Pelt of Den-
ver, drive organizer.
Pentagon Approval
Pentagon approval came as it
was revealed that the May Second
Movement prepared to raise funds
to send medical supplies to the
Communist Viet Cong.
Steve Cherkoss of Berkeley,
Calif., a West Coast leader of the
movement, who called the United'
States the "aggressor" in Viet'
Nam, said his group had "the go-
ahead" from the International
Red Cross to send the supplies.
He did not'elaborate on "the go-
ahead."
Students at' more than a dozen
American universities and colleges

across the nation are involved in
blood drives. The drives came into
being after the anti-Viet Nam
demonstrations.
Blood Donations
The Defense Department said
recently it has asked the Ameri-
can Red Cross to collect the blood
donations. A defense spokesman
said that while the blood is not
needed in Viet Nam, it will be
used for military requirements
within the United States.
He said the first collections will
be made early next month at the
University of Illinois, where 2,000
volunteer donors have signed up.
"We've had several inquiries al-
ready from groups on other cam-
puses who want to provide dona-
tions,", said Philip Hinterberger,
22, of Alton, Ill., president of the
Sigma Alpha Epsilon fraternity at
Illinois, sponsors of the drive.
Community Drive
The SAE chapter at Millikin
University in Decatur, Ill., is plan-
ning a community-wide drive for
blood donations.
In Berkeley, Cherkoss said that
sending medical supplies to the
Communist Viet Cong would be a
"concrete political act against U.S.
imperialism."
He said the drive to aid this
country's enemy would begin at

Stanford University, Palo Alto,
Calif. "Depending on the success
of the program at Stanford,"
Cherkoss said, movement chapters
at San Francisco State College
and the University of California
will start similar fund drives.
May Demonstration
The movement takes its name
from a demonstration on May 2,
1964, which it claims was the first
against U.S. intervention in Viet
Nam.
Brian Kelleher, leader of the
Michigan State University chap-
ter of the movement, denied pub-
lished reports that movement
members were being trained in
Michigan to fight with the Com-
munists.
Kelleher said the idea of send-
ing Americans to North Viet Nam
to fight had been raised before
but rejected as impractical.
Medical Aid
"The only possibility is that of
sending doctors and technicians to
aid the North-but that idea is
still in the stage of dinner table
conversation," he said.
Five visiting Saigon University
students told a news conference
at the University of Chicago that
while they believe in the right of
American students to protest, they
do not agree with the protests.

For RESULTS
Read-and Use
Daily Clossifieds

Author of four books, contributor to
legal and theological journals, visit-
ing lecturerstosnumerous law and
theological schols, Stringfellow is a
lawyer and Episcopal layman who does
not try to speak for Negroes and
Puerto Ricans in the Harlem ghetto
but who does underline the failure of
the American legal system to provide
equal justice for the poor, and the re-
luctance of the churches to "be in-
volved in the racial crisis beyond the
point of pontification.

STFINGFELLOW
LL.B.
(Practicing Attorney in Harlem,
author and lecturer)
SUNDAY, 7:15 p.m.: "The Scandal of the Church"
Lutheran Student Center,
Hill Street at South Forest Ave.
MONDAY, 4:15 p.m.: University Lecture
"The Challenge of Harlem to the
Renewal of the Church"
Multipurpose Rm., Undergrad Library
"It was to Harlem that I came from the Harvard Law
School. I came to Harlem to live, to work there as a lawyer,
to take some part in the politics of the neighborhood, to be
a layman in the Church there. It is now seven years later.
In what I now relate about Harlem, I do not wish to indulge
in horror stories, though that would be easy enough to do."

ANN ARBOR COUNSELING
AND GUIDANCE
321 SOUTH MAIN ST.
Suite 213, Whitker Building
Ann Arbor, Michigan 48108
665-3635 665-7902
By Appointment

try the
Canterbury
house
this weekend

strange

for
happenings
and

A

-My PEOPLE IS THE ENEMY,
William Stringfellow
COMING: TUESDAY & WEDNESDAY, NOV. 2 and 3: C. ERIC LINCOLN,
Author of The Black Muslims in America and My Face is Black;
Professor of Sociology, Portland State College
The above University Lectures are part of the Fall Series
sponsored by The Office of Religious Affairs, The University of Michigan;
Stringfellow's visit in cooperation with The Lutheran Student Center (NLC)
at The University of Michigan.

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or
cory mullen
or

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or
herb david
or
the great pumpkin
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no dancing
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314 East Liberty

9-12

0 * * . $1.00

: ::It's another "Finishing Touch" Greene's cus-
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I

i liii

11

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