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October 28, 1965 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1965-10-28

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THURSDAY, OCTOBER 28, 1965 THE MICIG AN IAIIV

1.11 % 11LV ll i~f\ LL'1LI

PAGE SEVEN

'Achilles Heel' of Michigan Gridders: The Knee

SPORTS SHORTS:
Buntin Foul Shots
INip Bullets, 108=107

By HOWARD KOHN
Knees had been a topic of
conversation long before Cour-
reges and his fashion designning
colleagues exposed that .contro-
versial part of the anatomy by
conspicuously inching up the skirt.
The sports world (totally unre-
lated to sporty clothes) has first.
claim on any superficial honor
that comes with having people
with newsworthy knees.I
There is, of course, baseball's
great Mickey Mantle who prema-
turely retired this year after a
career plagued by chronic kneeI
problems.
Russell and Baylor
And basketball players like Bill
Russell of the Celtics who is trou-
bled with arthritic knees, and El-
gin Baylor of the Lakers who at
times is so badly handicapped by
calcium flakes above the kneecap
that he is reduced to hobbling.

There are gladiators of the of knee impairments or "the curse
gridiron like Joe Namath, former of Hippocrates."
Alabama quarterback who signed For instance, in the last 20
a $400,000 bonus pact with the years of Wolverine grid history,
New York Jets even though a only five have not been darkened
loose cartilage in his knee had re- by the loss of a regular due to
stricted his scrambling abilities the knee nemesis. Back in 1950
during most of his senior year. when three-fourths of the na-
And Gail Cogdill of the Lions, one tion's college players were hit with
of the many pro gridders to sit on injuries, including 17 per cent
the bench at an inoportune mo- with knee disabilities, Michigan
ment with a cripple knee. And
teammate Terry Barr, another
pass receiver prone to damage of Today's Duffyism
that hinged joint in the leg. ,..

thus tretching the tendons in the

Not to mention the brilliantly-
clad snow enthusiasts who don
their skis and go dashing down
steep slopes, and depending upon
omnipresent Fate, either eventual-
ly twist their knees or break their
legs.
The Curse
But Michigan football players
must come closer than any other
sportsmen to dominating the field
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'Asked how Hawaiian players
Dick Kenney and Bob Apisa
came to Michigan State, MSU
Head Coach Duffy Daugherty
said: "First they had to swim to
the mainland. That way we
knew they had endurance."
was one of the top contributors
to the statistics.
Then in 1960, starting quarter-
back Bob Chandler was banged up
by the bruising Michigan State
line and the "Achilles heel" of the
Wolverines shelved him for the
season. The next year, Michigan
lost three starting guards, a tackle
and sophomore signal-caller Frosty
Evasheski before the midpoint in
the campaign-all victims of the
perennial knee affliction.
First-Stringers
This season Wolverine fans have'
watched as knee injuries sidelined
three of the first-stringers, half-
back Jim Detwiler and guards
Barry Dehlin and Bill Keating for
the entire season. Defensive back
Dick Wells was the latest addition
to the growing ranks suffering a
pulled ligament in the Purdue
game and sitting out the Minne-
sota game.
Michigan's head trainer Jim
Hunt expounded on some of the
factors behind the abundance of
knee problems in college football.
"Equipment is partially at fault,"
explainedHunt. "The shoes have
been equipped with long cleats
which keep the player's foot plant-
ed in the ground when he pivots,
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knee.
Conditioning
"Conditioning is also impor-
tant," said Hunt. "The players no
longer have the opportunity for
daily 'sidewalk pushing.' They us-
ually use bikes or cars because
classes are further apart and
thereby forego a good way of
strengthening the knee muscles."
Other reasons rumored to cause
an increased susceptibility of the
knee are end sweeps which expose
the runner to possible roll-out
tackles and the sidewise running
of the halfbacks which tends to
provoke a twisted knee upon being
tackled.
According to Hunt, however,
"Most injuries are found in the
heat of battle. Anything can hap-
pen at the bottom of the pile
when about. ten players are heap-
ed together.
'Less Dirty'
"Rough as pro football is, it is
less dirty. Gone is the cheap-shot
artist who tries to deliberately
hurt a player.
"Because, although most injur-
ies are accidental, there is always
someone who tries to impress the
fans with an extra rough play."
Knee injuries in basketball,
while not as prevalent as in foot-
ball, are caused by the fast starts
and stops, rapid lateral and back-
ward movements and constant
jumping.
A legendary trainer of the cage
sport long ago devised one of the
most widely used methods of
treating knee injuries-the "Duke
Simpson" treatment. The method
involves using a roll and a half of
tape to wrap up the player's leg,
going from the calf halfway up
the thigh.
Iowa's Burnsj
Denies Rumor
Of Resignation,
By The Associated Press
IOWA CITY-"I have not re-
signed, nor do I have any plans to
do so," University of Iowa football
Coach Jerry Burns said yesterday.
It has been rumored for about
a week that Burns, in his fifth
season, has, or planned to, resign.
Iowa this season has won only one
of six games.
"At the end of the season I am
sure the board in control of ath-
letics will review my status,"'
Burns said, and "make whatever
decision it believes'is in the best
interest of the football program at
the University of Iowa.
"Until then, I would ask again
that Iowa fans stay behind the
team in its remaining four games.
We are doing our best. Right now
my only concern is beating In-
diana."

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By The Associated Press
BALTIMORE - Rookie Bill
Buntin sank six free throws in
the final two minutes as the De-
troit Pistons came from behind
and scored a 108-107 NBA victory
over the Baltimore Bullets last
night.
Buntin dropped in seven field
goals in addition to, his 11 free
throws for a game total of 25
points.
The Pistons, who missed half of
their 40 foul shots while losing to
Baltimore 117-98 Tuesday, had
trouble from the foul line again
before Buntin came through in
the stretch.
Detroit opened up a 23-8 lead
at the outset but blew the big
advantage to fall behind 65-60
early in the third period. A 10-
point spurt, six by Buntin and
four by player-Coach Dave De-
Busschere, put the Pistons on top
73-66, and the lead see-sawed
after that.
MONTREAL - Jean Beliveau's
late goal broke a 3-3 tie and gave
the undefeated Montreal Cana-
diens a 4-3.'National Hockey
League victory over thie New York
Rangers last night.

It was Montreal's third straight
victory in the NHL's opening
week, and the Canadiens' second
straight by the same score against
the Rangers.
Beliyeau converted passes from
Dick Duff and Bobby Rousseau
at 14:28 of the final period after
the Rangers hadhstruggled from
behind to tie the game three
times. New York's Earl Ingarfield
was serving a two-minute penalty
for faceoff interference when
Beliveau hit.
* * *
BOSTON-Ron Ellis broke the
National Hockey League scoring
famine 'for Toronto with a 50-foot
slap shot last night and the
Maple Leafs went on to a 2-1
victory over the Boston Bruins.
Ellis scored in the first period
for the Leafs, who were shut out
in their first two games. He took
a pass from Frank Mahovlich at
the blue line and let fly a waste-
high drive that broke off rookie
goalie Gerry Cheevers' glove and
slipped between his knees.
Mahovlich made it 2-0. Toronto,
in the second period before Ron
Stewart broke the ice for Boston.
H.I.S SLACKS
at
WILD's
State Street on the Campus

-Daily-Jim Lines
MICHIGAN'S TOM KEATING is helped off of the tield by Char-
ley Kines (78) and Raymond O'Donnell after he injured his
knee in the California game. Keating is one of the four Michigan
starters to be felled by knee afflictions this season.

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