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October 28, 1965 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1965-10-28

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY THURSDAY, OCTOBER 28, 1965

PAGE TWO

PAGE- TWO THE MICHIGAN DAILY THURSDAY, OCTOBER 28, 1985

MACLEISH INTERVIEW:
Author Diseusses '1

(Continued from Page 1)
lum. "It was great. The word in-
jected into a person's imagina-
tion could do the whole thing, but
T.V. killed that deader ,than a
Coot."
Is T.V. debasing high culture?
"I'm absolutely incoherent on that
s u b j e c 4," MacLeish exclaimed.
"T.V. is a constant massage of
mediocrity on the American mind.
T.V. has demonstrated on the
news front that it is a powerful
instrument and can be effective
in a democracy. But T.V. drama
is another story. It is Just awful,
"I keep -. wondering whether
America isn't developing two cul-
tures," MacLeish continued. "The
first, a mass non-culture promoted
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by T.V., and the second an elite
culture. Some works on our elite
culture could only have been
written by Americans. Emily Dick-
inson is probably the greatest
American poet we've seen. Twain,
Hemingway, Faulkner, Jefferson,
Lincoln were all part of a shrewd
American mentality and high
standard of judgment."
"Herakles," like "J.B.," is writ-
ten in verse. In an interview by
Prof. Donald Hall of the English
department published in Horizons,
January, 1960, MacLeish said,
speaking of "J.B." that a play-
wright is justified in using verse

[erakies-'
if the material has an added di-
mension - a shadow, you might
say. For example, a play based on
a mythical situation where the'
implications are universal."
MacLeish wrote in his programi
note to "Herakles" that this myth
Is "closer to the human mind, to1
the imagination of the race, thana
it has been for thousands of
years."
MacLeish ended on an optimis-
tic note for American culture.
"Judging by the Harvard lads I,
taught, there is nothing wrong
with the American sensibility or
emotional capacity."

By VICKI LASSAR
and DALE GOLD

SELECTIVE SERVICE:
Review Sit-in Status
For Draft Violation

IN TOWN
Special Events
In honor of Halloween, the Un-
ion will be showing a "Halloween
Horror Movie," "White Zombie,"
with an assortment of sundry
monsters. (7 and 9 p.m., Oct. 31)
* e
Art
Forsythe Gallery, 201 Nickels
Arcade-Frank Cassara's "Color
Intaglia." (Weekdays 10-4, Satur-
days 11-1, through Nov. 11.)
*Cinema
Cinema Guild, Architecture Au-
ditorium-"Footlight Parade," a
Busby Berkley Musical of 1930
vintage. Also "Occurrence at Owl
Creek Bridge." (7 and 9 p.m., Oct.
28, 29.)
"Rififi" with Jules Dassin. Still
the most exciting crime adventure
ever filmed. (7 and 9 p.m., Oct.
30, 31.)
Campus Theatre, South Univer-
sity-"The Pawnbroker," starring
Rod Steiger. (7 and 9 p.m., through
Nov. 3.)
Michigan Theatre, East Liberty'
-"The Ipcress File," with Michael
Caine. (1, 3, 5, 7, 9 p.m., through
Nov. 4.)
State Theatre, State. St.-"The
Face of Fu Manchu," starring
Christopher Lee. (1, 3, 5, 7, 9 p.m.,
Oct. 27-Nov. 3.)

Music
University Symphony Band,
conducted by William Revelli.
(Hill Auditorium, 8:30 p.m., Oct.
28.)
Czech Philharmonic Orchestra,
conducted by Karel Ancerl and
Vaclav Neumann. Program in-
cludes: Dvorak: Carnival Concert
Overture . . . Martinu: Symphony
no. 4 . . . Janacek: Taras Bulba
. Smetana: Moldau. (Hill Audi-
torium, 8:30 p.m., Oct. 29.)
University and NYU Glee Clubs.
(Hill Auditorium, 7 and 9:30 p.m.,
Oct. 30.)
Rafael Puyana, distinguished
Colombian Harpsichordist. (Rack-
ham Auditorium, 8:30 p.m., Oct.
31.)
Poznan Choir, 75 boys and mens
voices under the direction of
Stefan Stuligrosz. (Hill Auditor-
ium, 8:30 p.m., Nov. 2.)
Radio
WUOM F.M.-91.7 mc. Ann Arbor
Sibelius Centennial, the fourth
special program commemorating
the birth of the Finnish composer.
Featured is an illustrated lecture,
"The Life and Works of Sibelius,"
prepared by Prof. Taneli Kuusisto,
Rector, Sibelius Academy in Hel-
sinki. (7:30 p.m., Oct. 28.)
Football, U of M vs. Wisconsin.
(1:15 p.m., Oct. 30.)
Music of the Masters-Selections
from Harvey Schmidt's musical,
"The Fantasticks," directed by
Julian Stein . . . Mozart: Diverti-
mento No. 2 in D major, K. 131-1

Outside the Classroom this Week

Royal Philharmonic; Sir Thomas.
Beecham, conductor. (8:05 p.m.,
Oct. 30.)
New York Philharmonic, con-
ducted by George Szell. Mussorg-
sky: Prelude to "Kovanshtchina"
... Prokofiev: Piano Concerto No.
3, Op. 26-Gary Graffman, pianist
. Tchaikovsky: Symphony No. 5
in E minor. (2:00 p.m., Oct. 31.)
Hague Philharmonic Orchestra,
conducted by Willem van Otterloo.
Berlioz: Le Carnaval Romain ...
Franck: "Psyche." . . . Ravel:
"Daphnis and Chloe," Suite No. 2
* . Pijper: Symphony No. 3
(8:30 p.m., Nov. 2.)
Opera Night-Verdi: Aida with
Malberto Erodo conducting. (7:00
p.m., Nov. 3.)
Television
"Mary Mary," film version of
Jean Kerr's play starring Debbie
Reynolds. (Channel 2, 9:00 p.m.,
Oct. 28.)
Aaron Copland-the second of a
two-part study of experimental
music in the Twenties. (Channel
56, 7:00 p.m., Oct. 29.)
American Symphony-Leopold
Stokowski conducts the American
Smyphony Orchestra in Samual
Barber's Violin Concerto and De-
bussy's Three Nocturnes for Or-
chestra. (Channel 56, 9:30 p.m.
Oct. 29.) Repeat of American
Symphony program (Channel 56,
7:30 p.m., Oct. 31.)
"East of Eden," film version of
John Steinbeck's novel starring
James Dean, Julie Harris and

Theatre
"Herakles," by Archibald Mac-'
Leish-World premier of the Pul-
itzer Prize winner's provocative
new play, directed by Alan.
Schneider. Evening performances
at 8:00 p.m. with matinees on
Saturday and Sunday at 2:30 p.m.
Oct. 27-31, Nov. 3-7.)

' Art
Toledo Museum of Art, Toledo-
"Art Across America," an out-
standing group of 50 paintings
and wall hung constructions by
contemporary American artists.
Exhibit is visiting Toledo in a two-
year tour which premiered in New
York. (Through Oct. 31.)

Raymond Massey. (Channel 11. Speakers
11:30 p.m.. Nov. 2.) Dwight MacDonald, author and
"The Barber of Seville," an critic wil speak on "Mass Culture
adaption of Rossini's comic opera. in the Great Society." (Michigan
(Channel 9, 9:30 p.m., Nov. 3.) Union, 2:00 p.m., Oct. 31.)
* * * OUT OF TOWN

presents
HALLOWEEN MOVIE
"THE WHITE ZOMBIE"

(Continued from Page 1)
"We feel that such tactics of
intimidation and repression have
no place in a democracy and can
only serve to weaken the funda-
mental principlesupon which the
country was founded."
The spokesman added that if
any local board should change the
students', status the decision will
be appealed.
Currently the students are out
on- a $100 appeal bond fromAnn
Arbor Municipal Court. Last week
Judge Francis O'Brien sentenced
the 31 demonstrators, three wom-
en and Sociology Prof. Tom Mayer
to 10 days in jail and fined them
$65. A request for a stay of the
sentence until Christmas' vaca-
tion was denied by the judge. The
sentence is being appealed.
ACLU
Meanwhile the American Civil
Liberties Union has condemned
Selective Service Director Holmes'
action. Rolland O'Hare, chairman
of the ACLU of Michigan, observ-'
ed, "Until now no one . . . has
suggested that the Selective Serv-
ice Act may be used as a device
to punish dissent . . . who can
say how the threat may be used to
dragoon youth into tomorrow. Col-
onel Holmes statement . .. mocks
our traditional national belief that
patriotic duty and honor, not
simply vengeance are served by
donning the nation's uniform."
The move has also been blasted
in a joint statement by Gary
Cunningham, '66, president of
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SGC and James McEvoy III, Grad.
They said, the "investigation is
unwarranted, a violation of rights
of petition and a repressive act."
not feel that we violated the se-
lective service act or interferred
with the operation of. the draft.
"We feel that such an action on
the part of the selective service is
strictly a political reprisal and has
no legal basis. By resisting such
action we are protecting the right
of all young people to protest
without fear of suppression.

OCT. 31. . . 7 and 9 P.M.
UNION BALLROOM
FREE

--

rwr

I

'HERAKLES' IMPRESSIVE:
StoryIs a ht Paradox

SPECIAL NON-SUBSCRIPTION
EXTRA PERFORMANCES

By JOHN MANNING, JR.
You will, if you are attuned at
all to this year's offerings of the
APA, see their presentation in
repertory of Archibald Mac-
Leish's new drama, "Herakles."
You will, like last night's premier
crowd, be honestly impressed.
You will find that MacLeish has
given you, in the convoluted
"story" of a mighty hero's re-
turn, a mighty paradox. You will
find, in the dramatist's words,
"that the returning hero . .
learned at last, in the moment of
his triumph, that there was one
monster he had failed to overcome
, , , the most terrible of monsters
-man turned god." You will un-
doubtedly read in him the para-
digm >of modern man, vainly con-
fident of his exploits and his pow-
er.

'There is on hand a plump and
cynical dowager tourist She (Dee
Victor), and her companions
(Jennifer Harmon and Patricia
Conolly) afford a set of lenses
through which to view the myth-
ic hero's return. Thse busy ladies'
muddy chatter soak up the first
10 minutes of the play. Mr. Mac-
Leish will undoubtedly slice and
simplify considerably this slow and
wooden stuff, however relevant.
He will also, I trust, rework in
places some exorbitantly allitera-
tive lyricism, where it cries for
more restraint.
Beyond the very outset, the
young ladies quickly lose their
relevance, but there is nowhere
for them to go. Miss Victor, after
an uneven beginning, gradually
warms to the very competent chor-
ic voice of bitterly realistic mod-
ern man. And Keene Curtiss coun-

terpoints her well, as the misguid-
ed slob whose philosophy is un-
fortunately founded too much on
faith.
You will find that Sydney
Walker, in a role that affords lit-
tle maneuverability, roars his way
convincingly through the dawning
realization that his greatest tri-
umph has all the while been ashes.
You will find your truly enthus-
iastic praise accorded Rosemary
Harris, as his wife Megaza, in a
performance characterizd by
striking restraint and control, to-
gether with a real sense of the
rhythm of MacLeish's curious
lines. There should have been
more of her.
But you will, like last night's
crowd, applaud nervously and un-
certainly at the end, and you will
probably, like them, file quietly,
almost grimly, from the theatre.
For MacLeish has offered a con-
clusion that is not a ;conclusion,
and it is bleak and bitter. He has
defined a world in which even
arche-typical ideals are fradulent.
Having throttled the hound of hell,
man finds that the silence is more
terrifying. We are left to wander
through our sad cities where "at
least there is no myth," consoled
mererly by Megara's simple, ter-
rible understanding that "only
human hands can bury what we
have to bury."
This is more Socratic sermon
than drama. But the most danger-
ous dramatic thesis asserts there
is no thesis.
You will perhaps wish the
hound had howled at the end.

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Wednesday, Nov. 10 (8:00 P.M.),
Thursday, Nov. 11 (8:00 P.Mi.)
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Friday, Nov. 12 (8:00 P.M.)
Saturday, Nov. 13 (2:30 P.M. & 8:00 P.M.)
HERA KLES
and "KRAPP'S LAST TAPE"
Sunday, Nov. 14 (2:30 & 8:00 P.M.)
BEST SEATS NOW AT BOX OFFICE
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