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October 22, 1965 - Image 2

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1965-10-22

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PAGE TWO

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

FRIDAY. OCTOBER 22, 1965

PAGE TWO TUE MIChIGAN DAILY FRIDAY, OCTOBER 22. 1965

THE HILL'-
Lumet Creates Magnificent
Study of Man vs. Authority

Olympia Documents
Beauty of 36 Games!

By JOYCE WINSLOW

At The State Theater
"Hup! Hup! Knees up in the
air when you run, dammit. Now
double-time. Hup!"

ed around the characters' rela-
tionship to the hill.
Williams, his sadistic task-serg-
eant, climbs the hill vicariously
through the struggles of his pris-
oners who climb because they are
ordered to do so, but later learn
that ' the best resistance to au-

The formidable sergeant-major thority is to stop fearing it. A
punctuates his orders with club climb assigned to punish them
and spit and those who don't obe- changes to a hideously funny sand
diently cower at the mountain fight.
face the hill-a man-made heap The camera follows the interac-
of sand which goes nowhere but tions between each of the char-
up, from both sides. acters skillfully, revealing not
Recorded in "The Hill" is the or- only the obvious power structure
deal of five cell-mates in their of the prison hierarchy, but also
conquest of the hill and the au- the status of each of the five
thority i represents in a British men in the cell. In a stand-up
disciplinary camp for His Majes- role as ringleader is Sean Con-
ty's disloyal, insubordinate sol- nery (James Bond) who proves
diers. that he doesn't need the luxury
Director Sidney Lumet ("The and deviousness of Fleming's
Pawnbroker") has created a mag- scripts to come out the winner.
nificent sociological study center- Connery, in cr'ew-cut and mous-
1 N
I U
N !
Filmed i~n'H itler's Germany :
I
1 1
i #
# #
, I
Fie GnHmlr'nesrman
a #
i !
Part 11..I
* I
1I#
* I
* INTEACIETUEADTRU
# !
! With German newsreels
t #
# #
ITiECIIIW - R 1ON
IETHEPARCHITECTURE AUDITORIUM
*ADMISSION% FIFTY CENTS u
SPECIAL NON-SUBSCRIPTION
EX TRA PERFORMANCE'S

tache is excellent as a defiant sol-
dier out to upset legal autocracy.
However, the best performance
is given by big, lithe Ossie Davis,
who renounces his prisoner-status
by removing the symbol of army
authority, taking off his prison
uniform, frolicking only in his
underwear. He declares himself a
civilian outside of army jurisdic-
tion. Davis is excellent in the
dramatic scenes and superlative in
the comic scenes.
Ian Barran, as the sympathetic
task-officer, managed to be con-
vincing without being sticky-
sweet. Harry Andrews who played
the tough sergeant-major was
handicapped in his stereotyped
role of aneofficer who lives for
killing alone.
British accents, too thick to be

By GERALD AHRONHEIM
At The Cinema Guild
The second half of Olympia,
Leni Riefenstahl's documentary
epic of the 1936 Berlin Olympic
Games, begins with an idyllic se-
quence taken in the Olympic Vil-
lage. Once highly controversial,
the shots of athletes training,
getting acquainted and relaxing
are reminiscent of classical gym-
nasia.
This mood is heightened by the
slow-motion sequences of the gym-
nastics competition which follow.
These sequences are effectively
climaxed by a stunning series of
fancy dives shot from a multitude'
of angles; the final sequence sil-
houettes divers soaring birdlikeI
against the clouds.

and the occasional swastika em-
blem or flag, there is a conspic-
uous absence of political over-
tones in this second half of Olym-1
pia. Originally intended at least
in part as a propaganda vehicle
for the Nazi Reich, the film fails
at this task in more subtle fash-
ions than merely in its depictions
of the frequent German defeats
at the Games.;
One cannot help but make note
of the bearing, demeanor and fa-
cial expressions of a German
Army officer as he works towards
his gold medal in the modern pen-
tathlon, and his unintended con-;
formity to a popular stereotype.
The refreshing youthfulness of
the teenaged American runnerup
contrasts surprisingly with his
opponent's slow-witted bullish-
ness.
Prophetic Flame
In a stran el propheti meta-j

Across
Campus
FRIDAY, OCT. 22
4:15 p.n.-Hans Hofmann will
speak on "Religion as a Feel of
Life" in the Multipurpose Rm. of
the UGLI.
7 and 9 p.m.-Cinema Guild will
present "Olympia. Part II" at the
Architecture Aud.
8 p.m.-The Professional The-
atre Program will present the APA
in "You Can't Take It With You"
at Mendelssohn Theatre.
8:30 p.m.-The Czech Philhar-
monic orchestra, conducted by
Vavlav Neumann, will give a con-
cert in the Choral Union Series at
Hill Aud.
SATURDAY, OCT. 23
2:30 and 8 p.m.-The Profes-
sional Theatre Program will pre-
sent the APA in Henrik Ibsen's
"The Wild Duck" at Mendelssohn
Theatre.
7 and 9 p.m.-Cinema Guild will
show "To Have and Have Not" ats
Architecture Aud.
SUNDAY, OCT.24
9 a.m.-The Hastings Biological
Chemistry Symposium begins at
the Medical Science Bldg..
2:30 p.m.-Korean Dancers will
perform at the Musical Society
Dance Festival in Rackham Aud.
2:30 and 8 p.m.-The Profes-
sional Theatre Program will pre-
sent the APA in Ibsen's "The Wild{
Duck" at Mendelssohn Theatre. =
7 and 9 p.m.-Cinema Guild will
present "To Have and Have Not
at the Architecture Aud.

S.

N+

4

*** .

PARISIENNE 'PRICES FROM $100 TO $1200

++ 1 v:a , w - u C 1 bt1gC, y jlVL lca
easily comprehended, impeded en- A different pictorial technique, phor, the film ends with the Olym-
joyment of the movie. And possi- the frame-filling closeup, is used pic flame burning out at the end
bly because army visors conceal to good advantage most notably in of the Games, sending up a black
the greater part of the pace, the the diving, men's swimming, row- smudge towards the sun.
responsibility for conveying great ing, and cycling events. Unfor- Also on the program is a ,rewar
stress and emotion was delegated tunately, as in the field events, an G mn n r ie
to the noses of the characters. occasional athlete refuses to co-hau") showing Wehrmacht in-
The sadistic task-sergeant, who operate with te long lens, moving ductees on rather bucolic maneu-
was usually under great stress di- out of the frame leaving the au- vers. One recognizes ordinary hu-
lated his nostrils with vigor, but dience only a hand, foot or but- man faces atop the uniforms
looked more like a frustrated rab- tock as evidence of his presencerather than those of the monsters
bit than an itnensely bothered ar- No Politics one might have expected; however,
my officer. Except for the recurring Wehr- a coldly impersonal quality super-
It is to "The Hill's" credit that, macht uniform in the modern venes as the boyish heads don
despite this, it still stands. pentathlon and equestrian events, I their coalscuttle helmets.
DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN
.SW.S.WV.VV.S..SV...,S..SSS..SV.,....... . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . .

schianderer
on south
university
1113 SOUTH U.

Scfan derer
& SonS
208 S. MA 1N 'ST.

4

The Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publication of the Univer-
sity of Michigan, for which The
Michigan Daily assumes no editor-
ial responsibility. Notices should be
sent in TYPEWRITTEN form to
Room 3519 Administration Bldg. be-
fore 2 p.m. of the day preceding
publication, and by 2 p.m.'Friday
for Saturday and Sunday. General
Notices may be published a maxi-
mum of two times on request; Day
Calendar items appear once only.
Student organization notices are not
accepted for publication.
FRIDAY, OCTOBER 22
Day Calendar
Management Development Seminar--
"Management by Objectives": Michi-
gan Union, 9 a.m.
Office of Religious Affairs Lecture
--Hans Hofmann, ThD, Center for the
Study of Personality and Culture, Inc.,
Mass., "Religion as a Feel of Life":
Multipurpose Room, Undergraduate Li-
brary, 4:15 p.m.
Cinema Guild-"Olympia," Part II:
Architecture Aud., 7 and 9 p.m.
Professional Theatre Program Per-
formance-APA Company in "You Can't
Take it With You": Mendelssohn
Theatre, 8 p.m.
Musical Society Dance Festival-Alba/

Reyes Spanish Dance Company: Rack- search Awards are still available for
ham Aud., 8:30 p.m. 1966-67. List of openings may be con-
sulted in the Graduate Fellowship Of-
General Ns fice, Room 110 Rackham Bldg.
CieoPcgs
Students, College of Engineering: The (Continued on Page 8)
final day for DROPPING COURSES
WITHOUT RECORD will be Fri., Oct. 22. 483-4680
A course may be dropped only with the
permission of the classifier after con-
ference with the instructor.
University Players Season Coupons:
tE4 persons who hold CARPENTER RAD
%JUiomt PVvr .xA OSUJ *on and ,n* 4"

niversit aers seasn:copnau
have not yet exchanged them for their
tickets. Best seats may be obtained
by mailing these coupons to Univer-
sity Players, U-M Dept. of Speech,
Frieze Bldg., Ann Arbor 48104.
National Science Foundation Gradu-
ate Fellows now studying under one-
year fellowships, or in the second-year
continuations of two-year awards have
been mailed material to apply as re-
newal applicants for tenure in 1966-67.
If material is not received within a
week, report to Graduate Fellowship Of-
fice, Room 110 Rackham Bldg. Appli-
cations must be in Washington by Dec.
10, 1965.
National Science Foundation Post-
doctoral Fellowship applications are due
in Washington by Dec. 13. A descrip-
tive brochure may be consulted in the,
Graduate Fellowship Office, Room 210
Rackham Bldg.
Fulbright-Hays Lectureships and Re

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ADDED LAUGH HIT
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PROFESSIONAL
THEATRE PROGRAM
presents

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APA REPERTORY COMPANY
THE WILD DUCK
Wednesday, Nov. 10 (8:00 P.M.),
Thursday, Nov. 1'1 (8:00 P.M.)
You Can't Take It With You
Friday, Nov. 12 (8:00 P.M.)
Saturday, Nov. 13 (2:30 P.M. & 8:00 P.M.)
HERAKLES
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Sunday, Nov.14 (2:30 &8:00 P.M.)
BEST SEATS NOW AT BOX OFFICE
Mendelssohn Theatre 668-6300

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ROD STEIER
THE PAWNrOKE

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When in Southern California visit Univermaf City Studios

FIRST AMERICAN TOUR!
T ILEMAJESTIC
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100 MUSICIANS
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FRI., OCT. 29, 8:30
PROGRAM

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With untypical British unreserve we make bold
to say that this thriller is downright camp.
"TO TELL WHAT IT IS ABOUT
Ut

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WOULD BE I
SHOW AWAY,
IT'S TOO GOO

YOU CAN'T
TAKE IT'
WITH YOU
by
GEORGE S. KAUFMAN
and MOSS HART
The classic
American comedy!
Directed by
Ellis Rah

4

THE
WILD DUCK
by
HENRIK IBSEN
A new version
of the poignant drama
Directed by
StAnhen Portar

"A thinking man's
'Goldfinger', funni
by far than any
of the Bond films
and more rewardi
too. -Newsweek
"A tingling,
no-nonsense
.suspense yarn!"
-Time Magazine
siAAA_ Js . :.1.

JGIVE THE
AND
layboy
er
"{
ing
HARRY SALTZMAN
-*
.
THE I line'
TECHN ICOLO TECU8CMOlt
from the
betWrb

4i

*

"Carnaval" Overture, Op. 92
Symphony No. 4
"Taras Bulba"
Symphonic Poem,"The Moldau"

Dvorak.
Martinu
Janacek.
. Smetana

11

1111I Y-G-Mwid SEVEN ARTS oreso i(NNEIH NYMANSProduelion slarrin

a' I

i

I

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