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October 17, 1965 - Image 7

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1965-10-17

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SUNDAY, OCTOBER 17, 1965

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE SEVEN

SUNDAY; OCTOBER 17, 1965 TUE MICHIGAN DAILY

a as Vi a! -l r J".L

q

LLOYD GRAFF

Griese's

Passes,

Kicks

Beat

G1 /
lrl

Kaid :Who Was Too
Small for The Irish'
Bob Griese minus pads, protection, and pigskin reminds you of
the kid who used to live down the street or maybe the guy you met at
a party and thought you knew before. n
He has the kind of face that melts into a ,mass, short clipped
russet hair, ruddy cherubic complexion, unbroken nose, and the
pleasant demeanor of an outgoing clergyman. Griese is about as
ungreasy as they ;come.
After watching this demon, this wretch, this crumby ratfink
of a Purdue passer-runner-kicker annihilate a Michigan team
that put on an almost chilling exhibition of ram and cram
defensive football, I expected to meet a nine-footer with a size
ten head.
I shqok his hand harder than he shook mine.
Bob Griese is awfully smallish. At 6', 180, he's too little to be a
F good major college quarterback, or at least, that's what the Notre
Dame folks said when they studied him at Evansville Cum Laude
high school four years ago! The Irish couldn't stomach a runty
quarterback ,but Purdue and Jack Mollenkopf figured they could
take a flyer on the pipsqueak because if he couldn't make it on the
giidiron with the brawny men he was good enough to play guard
on the basketball team.'
Well, the little squirt made it big in football, ask Bump Elliott,
Ara Parseghian, or anybody who knows quarterbacks. Or ask his
catcher, Bob Hadrick.
Summer Practice . , .
"Bob and I went to summer school this year and three times a
week we'd work out together after classes. He'd throw until it was
dark. I'd get tired and want to give up and he'd say 'Bob, c'mon
just another half hour or so.' He's really improved this year. Now
he can look for more than one receiver and he's so much more
consistent."
Hadrick calls Griese a better all around quarterback than his
old battery mate Ron DiGravio, one of the top Big Ten quarterbacks
of his time. Another Griese fan named Mollenkopf concurs.
The statistics on this fellow who was too little for Notre
Dame are not good-they're slightly stupendous. He's completed
88 of 133, passes this season, a .662 percentage even with today's
off day of 22 for 38. In the total offense department he shows
1151-yds. or around two thirds of a mile. That's in five games.
As a team Michigan has a total offense of 1452 yds.
But Griese doesn't just pass and run-a lot of little guys do
that pretty well-he kicks too. He booted a couple extra points
yesterday, and a field goal you couldn't forget if you wanted to. In
other words, Griese simply wins.
Now this runt Griese doesi't chew tobacco and growl like a
common villain should. He isn't rude and arrogant. He's intolerably
polite. Little kiddies cling to him and beg for his autograph and he
doesn't thrust their pencils back into their innocent faces. And big
kiddies cling to him and ask stupid questions and he answers them
honestly and intelligently. He even has modesty and a sense of humor.
No Busy Signals .. .
This Griese kid tries to dodge publicity not bathe in it. He went
so far as disconnecting his phone in Lafayette to avoid enterprising
reporters.
Rather than boasting about his passing after the game he praised
his receivers, Bob Hadrick, Jim Bierne, and Jim Finley in the dressing
room. He regards Hadrick as some passers regard luck.
"Some days you have Hadrick and other days you don't," said
Bob.
Griese, like any passer who just set a school record for
completions for the third time in a month, was quite critical of
his own performance.
"In the first half I played badly because I was concentrating
completely on Hadrick who was well covered by Volk. You can't
look for just one man."
Griese's 18 completions in the second half indicate his flexibility.
Now I rather expected a great passer would be particularly proud
of his kicking, like a twenty-game winner would rather hold forth
on his one double of the year, than on his six shutouts. But Griese
wouldn't fit the stereotype. I asked him what he figured his field
goal range was.
"That 35 yards was my range," he quipped.
That's Bob Griese. Michigan didn't think him too small for
big-time football.

By JIM TINDALL
How vile is the taste left when
you watch the ball plop over the
goalposts by a foot after playing
your guts out for 59 minutes?
How bitter is the disappoint-
ment of putting everything to-
gether on Saturday afternoon and
having somebody kick the victory
right out of your fingers?
This week it wasn't fumbles, in-
terceptions, and broken plays that
beat the Wolverines by a 17-15'
score. It was a kid named Bob
Griese.
Large Scale Operator
Heruns, he passes, he quick-
kicks, he punts, he takes tickets,
he runs the scoreboard, and he
wins games with fieldgoals.
For the second week in a row
Purdue has remained unbeaten,
and in the national rankings,
thanks to Griese's right toe. Last
week he kicked one early in the
fourth quarter to provide a 17-14
victory margin over Iowa. This
week he kicked Michigan right in
the teeth with a boot from the
25-yard line that travelled 35
yards, 12 inches in the air.

Sure there are two solid backs
named Gordon Teter and Randy
Minniear, but what good is a run-
ning game if you can't keep the
defense honest with a passing
attack.
No matter how you spell 1965
Purdue football, it comes out
G-R-I-E-S-E.
Michigan held a 15-14 lead with
seven minutes left, but the Wol-
verines had to give the ball up on
downs with four minutes left in
the game giving Griese the stage
for his grand finale.
Controls with Coolness
The junior quarterback calmly'
took the helm on the seven-yard
line and started to pass, and pass,
and pass. Michigan's defense near-
ly stopped the drive, but with third
and three Minniear rammed over
tackle for a five yard gain giving
the Boilermakers a first down on
the Michigan 44.
Four plays later Griese was
spilled by Hoyne for a seven yard
loss setting up a second and 18
situation. Second down was a pass
thrown out ofnbounds to stop the
clock. That gave Coach Jack Mol-
lenkopf a chance to send in a play

and wound up in an 11 yard gain. ferent individual tacklers and two
This was the key play for it put Boilermakers attempting a gang
Griese inside his field goal range tackle, and danced his way into the
which he readily admits is only end zone for Michigan's first TD.
about 35 yards. The point after was blocked for
With fourth and six and 55 sec- the first time this year.
onds showing on the clock, the Michigan stopped Purdue's only-
triple - threat All - America back scoring threat of the quarter on
dropped back and kicked the win- the six yard line after the touch-
ning three points with a foot to down, and got close enough in the
spare. last seconds to attempt another
Griese's play was hardly spec- field goal. At no point in thefirst,
tacular in the first half, and a half was Purdue able to move the
hungry Michigan team hit like ball on the ground, and eight of
they are able to hit. The Wolver- Griese's 16 aerials went awry.
ines dominated play and moved Michigan Hangs On To It
the ball into fieldgoal range the It was Purdue, and not Mich-
first two times they had the ball; igan that fumbled three times. It
however, one Rick Sygar boot was was Purdue that had a pass in--
short while the other was wide. tercepted and not the Wolverines.
Praises Defense It was a Michigan half. The Wol-
The defense played a "great verines wanted this game. They
game," according to Coach Bump wanted it bad. They were holding
Elliott, and it was especially on defense and moving the ball
tough in the first period when it on offense. They were a team.
stubbornly refused to allow Pur- Enter Griese in the final act.
due a completed pass or a first Purdue elected to receive and
down. Teter almost got away on the
Michigan took the ball on its kickoff return, but was tackled
own seven to start the second from behind by Jeff Hoyne.
quarter, but had to punt. Teter Griese was smeared on his first
called for a fair catch but watched pass attempt but then completed
Jack Clancy bearing down on him four out of five in the fabled
instead of the ball and fumbled Griese fashion for Purdue's first
on Purdue's 27-yard line where score. His final flip in that drive
Clancy pounced on the ball. was another down-and-in to Fin-
Finds Paydirt ley good for 24 yards. Griese's kick
Two plays later Carl Ward was good and the 7-6 margin look-
headed through a hole off of left ed as if it might be the game for
tackle, bounced off of three dif- a few minutes.

I

Big Ten Standings
Conference

Michigan State
Purdue
Minnesota
Wisconsin.
Ohio State
Northwestern
Illinois
MICHIGAN
Iowa
Indiana

W
3
2
2
1
1
1
0
0
0

L
0
0
0
0
1
1
2
3
3

Pet.
1.000
1.000
1.000
1.000
.500
.500
.333
.000
.000
.000

PF
78,
34
56
37
35
27
60
22
30
31

PA
26
29
21
20
46
21
63-
31
47
96

W
5
4
2
2
2
2
2
27
1
1

L
0
0
2
,.
2
3
3
3
4
4

All Games
T PF PA
0 114 29
1 111 64
1 95 72
1 43 83
0 61 81
0 63 90
0 112 75
0 62 80
0 57 61
0 62 129

Sure there are other guys on from the bench that had not been
that team. He has three excellent attempted in a game all year. He
receivers in Bob Hadrick, Jim Fin- called for a screen pass to Teter.
ley, and Jim Beirne, but those Off Guard
sticky hands aren't worth anything The play caught Michigan con-
if the ball doesn't get to them. I'centrating on Hadrick and Finley

Michigan ran three plays, then
punted, and the Boilermakers
were off again. This time a rough-
ness penalty and four completed
passes were the keys to the TD.
The final play was a six-yard but-
tonhook to Beirne in the end zone.
Again Griese's foot was true.
The Wolverines were never
awed by the Purdue display of
aerial power, and they proceeded
to move the ball 18 yards in four
plays before Gabler threw a beau-
tiful pass that Clancy caught on,
the 20 and carried into the end'
zone.
Two-Point Attempt
Michigan had to go for the two
points and the play sent in from
the bench was the same one that
had failed last year when Mich-
igan suffered its only loss of the
year, 21-20. Gabler rolled right on
an option, decided to run, and was
knocked out of bounds two feet
before reaching the goal line.
Losing;. 14-12, the defense rose
up and stopped Purdue cold on
the next series, and after Griese's
punt the Wolverines started to'

move the ball once again. Fullback
Dave Fisher was a key man on the
drive, carrying the ball seven
times. The offensive machine was
unable to score in three plays from
the 10-yard line, and Elliott elect-
ed to go for a one-yard field goal
which was converted by Sygar.
After the game Elliott said, "I
have no regrets at all about going
for the three points rather than
the touchdown."
Last Effort Fails
After five Purdue plays th
Michigan offense took over bit
sputtered, gasped, and stalled on
the Purdue 47-yard line. Stan
Kemp kicked to the eight yard
line with four minutes left.
In retrospect Elliott said, "I
thought that we had a real good
chance to hold them when we
punted then, but . ..
He added, "Losing in the last
minute was a bitter, bitter disap-
pointment, bpt this team can
never be ashamed, for an instant,
of the way it played. I will never
ask a team to give me more than
these boys did today."

Griese Passes by

Wolvelrtnles

MICH
First Downs 22
Rushing 13
Passing7
Penalty 2
Total No. of Rushes 51
Net Tards-Rushing 171
Passing 137
Forward Passes Att. 29
Completed 9
Intercepted by 1
Yds. Interceptions ret. 0
Total Plays
(Rushes and Passes) 80
Punts, No. 7
Average Distance 41
Kickoffs, returned by 4
Yds. Kicks Returned 87
Punts 26
Kickoffs 61
Fumbles, No. 1
Ball Lost by 0
Penalties, =No. 5
Yards Penalized 45
RUSHING
Michigan
Tries N
Gabler 13 ;
Sygar 2
Ward 12 5
Fisher 21 8
Rowser 3 1
Totals 51 17
Purdue
Tries N
Griese 13 -2

. PURDUE
19
6
il
2
30
27
! 273
38
22
0
10

68
7
34
4
104
17
87
3
1
6
56
Ave.
0.7
4.0
4.6
4.2
3.3
3.4
Ave.
-2.2

Teter
Minn iear
Totals
Gabler
Ward
Totals
Griese
Clancy
Smith
Totals
Finley
Minniear
Teter
Hadrick
Beirne
Totals
Kemp
Griese
Herrick
Tot als

6
Ii
711
30
PASSING
Michigan
Att.
28
1
29
Purdue
Att.
38

23
33
27

Comp. Yards
9 137
0 0
9 137
Comp,. Yards
22 273

PASS RECEIVING
Michigan
No. Yards
8 125
1 12
9 137
Purdue
No. Yards
11 159
r 1 6
2 22
3 30
5 56
22 273
PUNTING
Michigan
No. Yards
7 284
Purdue
No. Yards
6 209
1 40

3.8
3.0
0.9

Ave.
15.6
12.0
15.3
Ave.
14.5
6.0
11.0
10.0
11.2
12.4
Ave.
41

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55
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Ave.
33
40

S240 34

LATE GAMES:
LUTm'TCU Holds Qff Aggies

-Daily--Jim Lines
SENIOR QUARTERBACK Wally Gabler straight-arms Purdue
defensive halfback George Catavolos after failing to find an open
Michigan receiver downfield. Gapler, injured in last week's defeat,
called the whole game and threw a touchdown pass to end Jack
Clancy.
--.-- - - - -

:
0
0

MAMIYA
DURST
FUJICA
KOMURA
ULTIMA

By The Associated Press
BATON ROUGE, La. -- Soph-
omore quarterback Nelson Stokley
thrust Louisiana State back into,
the thick of the Southeastern'
Conference title scramble last
night as he guided the Bayou Ben-
gals to a 31-21 victory over Ken-
tucky.
LSU defensive back Jerry Jo-
seph intercepted three Norton
passes to break up Kentucky's
scoring threat. .
Norton had six passes intercept-
ed by the alert LSU defense.
Texas A&M-TCU
FORT WORTH, Tex. - Texas

A & M gambled and lost on a
two-point conversion attempt last
night and Texas Christian seized
the opportunity to gain a 17-9
Southwest Conference football ver-
dict.
With 3:38 left and trailing 10-3,
Ledbetter rifled a fourth - down
pass from the TCU 21 to end Ken
McLean inside the 10 and he scor-
ed.
Coach Gene Stallings' Cadets
chose to go for broke and Ledbet-
ter's conversion pass was deflect-
ed amid a wave of arms and the
ball fell dead.

ON FRIDAY, OCTOBER
10:30 A.M.to 8:0

22, 1965
P.M.

Roberts
To Undergo
*Surgery,
HOUSTO, Tex. (AP) - Veteran
right-handed pitcher Robin Rob-
erts will undergo surgery next
week for removal of a bone chip
in his right elbow.
Roberts, the winningest right-
hander in baseball today and who
had a 5-2 record with the Hous-
ton Astros the last six weeks of
the 1965 season, will enter Meth-
odist Hospital Tuesday.
Roberts, q9, a veteran of 18 ma-
jor league seasons, said the Hous-
ton team physician advised him
to undergo the operation and as-
sured him the elbow would be well'
healed prior to the spring train-
ig.
Roberts, who has won 281 ma-
jor league ball games, posted a
1.89 earned run average with
Houstin in 10 starts, including
two straight shutouts.
K

SPORTS NIGHT EDITOR :
JIM LaSOVAGE
, '

- 66
Little card.
Big convenience.
There's one reserved for you,
Pick it up today.
1112 South University

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District Sales Manager
Mr. Tomkow and Mr.

JEROME BROWN
' Technical Coordinator
Brown will be in our store

to demonstrate their equipment and assist you
in any way possible.
QUARRY PHOTO
318 S. STATE

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Othertop favorites a re made
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