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October 15, 1965 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1965-10-15

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

PAGE EIGHT

TILE MICHIGAN DAILY

FRIDAY, OCTOBER 3, 1965,

PAEEIH T E Mi h GA ALYFIDY OTBE 5.ii

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School Time
Is
OLYMPIA
TIME O4p
University Typewriter Center
Home of OLYMPIA, the Precision Typewriter
613 E. William St, 665-3763

Band
By STEVE FICK
'Twas brillig, and 'twas a pair
of Michigan Marching Band ba-
ton twirlers sharpening up their
specialty in the brisk afternoon
breezes of Wines Field whilst
their more musical colleagues
joined efforts inside the nearby
practice building.
"Why the hell are we spending
enmih tim nn th TvU Fiyht

trives)
Band, a quality so abstract that
even conductor William D. Re-
velli says he cannot describe it
exactly, exhibited itself once again.
The spirit that prevails in the
band today is obvious even to the
Imost casual observer. It springs
from the personal philosophy of
Dr. Revelli, who for 31 years has
guided and shaped the band.

i

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1

the MUSic center, Inc.
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EICO ST-40 40-watt stereo amplifier
AT-50 GARRARD automatic changer and cartridge
2-FRAZIER full range speaker systems .........

S lulLile UnTr e IIUXg1
Song?" B-Ball Tryouts
"Because our arrangement of it Tryouts begin for the fresh-
is a lot better than theirs is, that's man basketball team this Mon-
why."3 day, Oct. 18, at 3:30 p.m. at
And the spirit of the Marching1the Intramural Building. Those
going out should bring their
INTER own equipment.
EEKEN D '66 The 207 members of the band
come into daily contact with Dr.
ASS Revelli's philosophy that "a note
E ET Gnearly perfect, a step nearly long
EETI N G Ienough, a kick nearly . high
Next Thurs. Union enough, are all terrible;" that per-
fection is what must be striven
7:30 3-S for, and that each person must
give his utmost. Revelli stops and
ON

ror Per
corrects even the most minute of
musical errors throughout each
two-hour practice session, and the
band's work on the football field
in preparation for each Satur-
day's program of marching ma-
neuvers receives the same treat-
ment.
Contagious Enthusiasm
Revelli's critical approach is
contagious, too-he means it to
be-and an onlooker at one of
the band's practice sessions can
expect to hear an almost constant
flow of advice from one member
to another on howto perfect his
marching form, all done in a
friendly, constructive way.
Moreover, Revelli, as a conduc-
tor leading his musicians through
practice, builds enthusiasm much
like a football coach firing up a
crowd at a pep assembly. "How
many beats to this note?" he will
shout, and back comes the shouted
answer: "Four!" "How many?" he
asks again, and the answer comes
back, louder this time: "Four!"
"Louder!" he bellows in return,
and this time the band's answer-
ing yell makes a noisy crowd at
Yost Field House sound like Fri-
day night at the library.*
/' T/ I rm 1 T 1 0A

rection
Signs, too, promote Revelli's-
and the band's-enthusiasm and
desire for perfection. The walls
are studded with posters like "The
Nation's Finest," "Drive - Drive -
Drive," and finally and unavoid-,
ably, the band's motto: "Not as
good as; but BETTER THAN."
Thus the graduates and under-
graduates, the LSA students and
the music students, and the stu-
University Record?
According to Michigan Daily
statistics, Joe Hoffman holds
the current paddleball record
with 702 consecutive hits. Any-
one who has a verified score
which beats this record should
notify The Daily to receive
appropriate credit for his ac-
complishment.
dents from the half dozen other
campus units who make up the
band, are unavoidably imbued
with what Revelli calls "the joy of
wanting to do something exceed-
ingly well."
Where does all this lead? In
terms of honors for the University
and its bands, it has led to a re-

UnderJ
cent international tour including
performances in nine European
and Near Eastern countries, count-
less concerts in the finest music
halls of this country, general rec-
ognition as the best college band
in the nation, and the production
of four record albums on national
release.
-.Seek Perfection
For the men in the band, says
Dr. Revelli, it leads to something
much more important: the estab-
lishment of an approach to life
that will carry over into every-
thing, else they do, causing them
to desire and to seek perfection.
The men apparently appreciate
what the band does for them, for
Dr. Revelli has received dozens of
letters and gifts for the band
funds from grateful band alumni.
These letters are more impor-
tant to Revelli than all the hon-
ors the band ever may win, for
the substance of his philosophy
concerning the role of the band
in the University is embodied in
his statement that, "I am not a
teacher of music, but of men."
And last, but not least, it has
led to immeasurable enjoyment
for thousands of fans over the last
30 years-so much that it has at

Revelli
times melted the memory of bit-
ter defeats into the more pleasant.
blurred ones of cool October Sat- M
urday afternoons spent cheering
for a team. And what else is a
band really for?
Boilermakers

Work Briefly
LAFAYETTE, Ind. (P)-Purdue
Coach Jack Mollenkopf ran his
Boilermakers through a brief
workout yesterday, saying they
appeared in fine shape for tomor-
row's Big Ten football clash at
Purdue.
Purdue will looseil up at Ross-
Ade Stadium today before flying
ito Ann Arbor for their third
straight game away from home.
Senior tackle Jerry Shay was
the only player on the injured
list. Mike Barnes, a defensive tac-
kle, will return to duty tomorrow
and should help offset the loss of
Shay.

0

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61

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'9

"MICHIGAN

MEMORIES"

for a

onderful

HO

ECO

I

G GIFT

{"*-

L ooking for an unusual gift that has the U-M and

'

Ann Arbor

written

all

over it? May

we suggest the new

book "Michigan

Memories," a handsome, hard-cover compilation of campus and
Ann Arbor town drawings by local artist Milt Kemnitz . . . each
accompanied by a fun verse from the light-hearted pen of Dick
Emmons.*. . produced and edited by Bob Forman ...

Anyone who's ever had any connection

with the U-M

M

will treasure it!.
$5.95 at any of these stores:
Slater's
Urich's
FolIett's
Wahr's
CK' rhec k's.

I

I

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