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October 15, 1965 - Image 7

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1965-10-15

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FRIDAY, OCTOBER 15, 1965

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

VACIV A VVUt '

'FRJPAY, OCTOBER 15, 1965 THE MiCHIGAN DAILY

raL SEVEN~r

q.,.

Hatcher

Address Pinpoints Current'U'Problems

(Continued from Page 1)
Britain, West Germany, Japan,
and other nations of the world.
When many people are crowded
in upon one another, understand-
ing tolerance, respect, and good
manners are necessary to decent
and humane living. Yet at the
moment of our greatest need,
these attributes have broken down
or failed to keep pace. We are all
deeply troubled by the growth of
crime, delinquency, disrespect for
others, excesses in human behav-
ior, and the hate and intolerance
that colors the legitimate protests
against the curable ills of our
time.
This also is manifest in stable,
internationally sophisticated so-
cieties like Britain, in affluent
United States, as well as in im-
poverished India and in the Con-

go and Tanzania. The underdevel-
oped countries or partially devel-
oped countries have compounded
the problem. They had the laud-
able but unrealistic ambition to
leap over the centuries and arrive
full-blown in the family of ad-
vanced nations.
The emotional strain, partic-
ularly upon the overcrowded young
generation, has been and is im-
mense and traumatic. It creates,
I repeat, a most difficult problem
for the universities everywhere.
As one of my distinguished
colleagues put it at the interna-
tional 'conference in Tokyo, we
face national suicide if we don't
accommodate t h e s e qualified
young people, and we face as-
phyxia if we do. Is there a ra-
tional course of action.
At this University, we have fol-

lowed and continue to follow the
policy of controlled growth. We
feel strongly that we must keep
pressing against the peripheral
walls, that we must accept stu-
dents to the limit of our capa-
city to maintain our institution-
al integrity, and to provide for
them the kind of education which
The University of Michigan has
traditionally been willing to un-
derwrite.
This has caused us pain and
hardship on the one hand because
of those whom we could not ac-
cept, and it has cost us some
mild degree of discomfort in areas
which have pressed hard against
the limits of size.
It will be necessary to continue
this policy and to bend all of our
efforts to solving the problems en-
tailed during the next decade at
a minimum.
I have said before and I repeat
again, much is expected of the
universities of the world today.
There is at hand no other instru-
ment in the society to perform
the functions that simply have to
be performed in this day and age.

r',

B'NAI B'RITH HILLEL FOUNDATION
1429 Hill Street

Sabbath Hol Ha-Moed Sukkot
TONIGHT,
Friday, October 15 at 7:30 P.M. Sharp
in the Zwerdling-Cohn Chapel
RABBI HARRY KAPLAN
Director of Hillel, Ohio State University
will speak on
"A People of Eternal Memories"
CANTORS: JOHN PLANER, JEFF ROSSIO
HILLEL CHOIR led by MIKE ROBBINS
JOAN TEMKIN at the Organ
The Service will conclude promptly at 8:30 P.M.

CAREER PLANNING
VOCATIONAL
APTITUDE TESTING
COUNSELING
ANN ARBOR COUNSELING
AND GUIDANCE
321 SOUTH MAIN ST.
Suite 213, Whitker Building
Ann Arbor, Michigan 48108
665-3635 665-7902
By Appointment'

I fear that the expectations,
however, are so great that the
universities simply will not have
the means to fulfill them, what-
ever their theoretical potential
might be.
We must do our very best none-
theless. We have a special obliga-
tion to maintain a moden environ-
ment of mutual respect and rea-
sonable tolerance of the views and
opinions of others while we dis-
cuss and debate the issues of our
time.
The University is not in a con-
spiracy to hinder the best possi-
ble education of its students or to
subvert the good intentions of our
government.
One unique function we can and
must perform is to keep an open
forum for research, inquiry, de-
bate. and free discussion.
There is splendor and freedom
in truth and the exihilarating
quest thereof, but truth itself is
elusive, often hard to come by,
and not always easy to recog-
nize, particularly in the fields of
human relationships. A few dec-
ades ago, good and honorable
men with the finest Oxford edu-
cation and religious devotion sen-
tenced witches to be hanged; be-
lieving it was God's command be-
cause Exodus 22:18 plainly com-
manded, "Thou shalt not suffer a
witch to live." No law was ever
changed, though we no longer
burn witches.
Our colleague, Dr. Waggoner of
the Department of Psychiatry, put
it very well in his addresss be-
fore his fellow scientists in Aus-
tin, Texas, a few days ago. Dis-
cussing the problem of specialized
training in this field of medicine,
Dr. Waggoner observed that the
most important element was "the
stimulation of his (the student's)
curiosity which will lead to re-
search or investigation. Many of
the things- which we now consider
to be fact or truth may very well
turn out in the not too distant fu-
ture to havehbeen in error. Many
things which you believed to be
fact 10 years ago are no longer
credible." I turned from Dr. Wag-
goner's cogent remarks to the
opening of Robert Hutchins' es-
say entitled, "Are We Educating
Our Children for the Wrong Fu-
ture?" The third sentence in the
second paragraph ran as follows:
"Almost every fact I was taught
from the first grade through law

saw 50 years ago. I am especially
embarrassed by the facts and
tendencies I proclaimed myself. I
can only hope the students in
the Yale Law School have forgot-
ten what I taught them. The
courts have overruled and the leg-
islatures repealed most of what I
knew."
These are just two ways of say-
ing an important truth which any
university must keep in mind as
it discharges its responsibilities. It
must keep its perspective on the
problems of the day. It must find
a proper balance between what is
topical and changing and the few
universals that we can verify.
This should guide as we go for-
ward in our ceaseless quest to re-
assess knowledge and wisdom,
adapt the learning process to the
curriculum which we offer to our
students. Emotion so easily dis-
rupts our persistent striving for
understanding and sound knowl-
edge.
We have a renowned faculty.
We have a cosmopolitan, alert,
ORGANIZATION
NOTICES
USE OF THIS COLUMN FOR AN-
NOUNCEMENTS is available to official-
ly recognized and registered student
organizations only. Forms are avail-
able in Room 1011 sAB.
Baha'i Student Group, Talk: "Baha'i
Teachings on Prayer," Oct. 15, 8 p.m.,
3545 SAB.
Baptist Student Union, Discussion.
"The Permanence of Moral Law," Fri.,
Oct. 15, 7:30 p.m., 1131 Church St.
Drawing Club, Meeting, Sat., Oct. 16,
9 a.m., Room 3D, Michigan Union.
Bring drawing materials.
« « «
Folk Dance Club, Folk dance with in-
struction, Fri., Oct. 15, 8-11 p.m., Bar-
bour Gym.
Guild House, Friday noon luncheon,
Barry Bluestone, president, U. of M.
Student Employes' Union: "Reasons and
Hopes for the U. of M. Student Em-
ployes' Union," Oct. 15, 12-1 p.m., Guild
House, 802 Monroe.
Newman Student Association, Com-
munity mass and supper, 5 p.m., Oct.
15. Fireside chat: "Christian Commu-
nity," Father Clark, 7:30 p.m.
Unitarian Student Group, John Horn-
beck, '66 Law School, "Legal Aspects of
Civil Rights in South," Sun., Oct. 17,
7:30 p.m. Rides at Markley and Union
at 7:15 p.m.
University Lutheran Chapel, Open
House after Purdue game, 4:15 to 5:30
p.m. All welcome, especially alums. Uni-
versity Lutheran Chapel, 1511 Washte-
naw.
Young Republicans, Three weeks due
notice is hereby given for the annual
(election) meeting of the University of
Michigan Young. Republican Club on
Nov. 9, 7:30 p.m., Rms. KLMN, Michi-
gan Union.

school is no longer a fact. Al- talented and capable generation
most every tendency that was pro- of selected students. We have such
claimed has failed to materialize. tools as the age affords to help
The facts and tendencies of to- them toward useful and reward-
day are those that nobody fore- ing lives. A thousand special tasks

and demands await them, over
and above the supreme obliga-
tion to help them become the kind
of person God intended them to
be.
I would single out six large yet
specific areas which demand high
priority attention for understand-
ing, training, and the capacity
and determination to do some-
thing about them.
1-The impact of urban-suburb-
an Universay City which now
poses a serious threat to man's
decent survival and pursuit of
happiness.
2-Transportation: (let's begin
with Ann Arbor, with cycle lanes,

rider education, and noise con-
troD.
3-Communications (includingI
newsmen for new and developing
countries).
4-Extended time of youth and
non-involvement in our society
and its economy on the one hand,
and early and lengthened retire-
ment on the other, and their re-
lation to the hard pressed middle
group in a rat race.
5-A foreign policy able to rec-
ognize obsolescence and respond
to change, and convincing enough
to command assurance and faith
on the part of the loyal nation.
6-A rational attack upon the
problem of federal, state, and lo-!
cal finance and taxation (or mem-
bership dues, as we should call it)
intricately related to the whole
expanding network (or chaos) of;

6STROH'S$
TOJ

relationships between federal cen-
trality and local initiative and re-
sponsibility.
We need general awarenessaon
the part of all, and expert and
professional skills on the part of
many to deal with these problems
as we deal with the awesome proj-
ects of the space age.
These tough and persistent
problems may not seem to imme-
diate or satisfying as a protest
speech on the Diag, or a clever
placard on Identity and IBM, but
they are among the stern con-
frontations of our time, and rep-
resent the solid task of a univer-
sity as it seeks freedom through
truth, and attempts to make it
prevail in world still largely cov-
ered with darkness and ignorance.
To this persistent striving we
are all unswervingly dedicated.

.r r r

"" .
mom

we

JOIN
DOC LOSH
WALLY WEBER
CAZZIE RUSSELL
BUMP ELLIOTT
TOM CECC H IN I
and the TEAM
THE MARCHING
BAND
and TOM HARMON!

FOLLOW THE HOMECOMING
PROCESSION FROM MARKLEY
HALL TO FERRY FIELD TO
SCREAM FOR MICHIGAN
AT THE
PEP SESSION!
(Beat Purdue and all that)

GOIN

A

7:45 P.M. F R I DA'

FIREW

Y
ORKS!

BEST DEALS ON '66
Mustangs-Falcons-Fords
USED CARS-ALL MAKES
SEE OR CALL
JOHN HARRISON
at
Henderson Ford Sales, 662-3261

_

"'I.'

DEPENDABLE
IMPORT SERVICE
We have the MECHANICS
and the PARTs.
NEW CAR DEALER
Triumph-Volvo-
Fiat-Checker
, We lease cars
as low as $4.50
per 24-hr. day.

I

Great for the going season
Stroh's six packs go where you go. Convenient
cans chill in minutes.. . can't break ... never
need an opener. Just pull the tab. Then
taste the only beer in America that's
brewed over direct fire. That's how f
Stroh's gets better flavor out of the
ingredients and puts it into the beer.
Next time you're planning an outing
.. make it even more fun ... take
along Stroh's distinctive red six-pack.
Ask for "six Stroh's to gol" Live a little.

WINTER
EEKEND
EETING
Next Thurs.
7:30

'66

Union
3-S

I

HERB ESTES
AUTOMART
319 W. Huron 665-3688

John Lauritzen wanted further knowledge

I

I

He's finding it at Western Electric

YAMAHA
EPOXI SKIS
Unequalled Skiing Ease
HI-FLEX-129.00
ALL AROUND-79.00
R a torte

When the University of Nevada awarded John
Lauritzen his B.S.E.E. in 1961, it was only the first
big step in the learning program he envisions for
himself. This led him to Western Electric. For WE
agrees that ever-increasing knowledge is essential

System's revolutionary electronic telephone switch.
ing system.
If you set the highest standards foryourself, both
educationally and professionally, we should talk.
Western Electric's vast communications job as

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