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October 15, 1965 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1965-10-15

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

FRIDAY, OCTOBER 15, 1965

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

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Sukarno Appoints Gen. S

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Army

Comn

Conferees
Agree on
Aid Proposal
Bipartisan Body OK's
Broad Program for
Federal College Help
WASHINGTON (P) - A broad
new program to strengthen high-
er education-including aid for
colleges, students and teachers-
was agreed upon yesterday by
House and Senate conferees.
In settling differences over bills
passed earlier by the House and
the Senate, the conferees approv-
ed a sweeping omnibus, measure
carrying an annual cost of $841
million. That is more than twice
what President Johnson requested.
Compromise Bill
The compromise bill, designed
to help the nation's colleges meet
an expanding enrollment that has
doubled in 10 years, would:
-Launch a new program of
scholarship grants for needy stu-
dents and provide federally guar-
anteed, low-interest loans for
students from middle-income fam-
ilies.
-Double the money available
for college construction grants
and start a new program designed
to upgrade college libraries and
library services generally.
-Establish a national teacher
corps to work with local school
districts in improving teaching
services in low-income areas.
-Strengthen small, struggling
colleges through direct financial
aid and through teaching fellow-
ship programs aimed at attracting
outstanding scholars to such in-
stitutions.
MIouse Republican conferees ob-
jected strenuously to the teacher
corps provisions and said they
would seek a House vote to have
the item removed from the bill. It
was in the original Senate bill but
was not voted on by the House.
The earlier bills received over-
whelming support in each body.
Major Change
A major change in the field of
federal education legislation is
provided by the new aid program
for needy students. The assistance,
called educational opportunity
grants, would amount to the first
federal undergraduate scholar-
ships.
The bill would authorize $70
million for the first year, to be
distributed among the states on
the basis of their total college en-
rollment and number of high
school graduates.
Student recipients would be se-
lected by the colleges and would
have to show they(need the money
in order to get it. The grants
would run between $200 and $800
a year, and would have to be
matched by some other form of
student aid-either loan or work
program.
Students in the upper half of
their college class could get an
extra $200, for a maximum of
$1,000.

iharto
iander
Leftist Fired
From Main
Military Post
President Promises
Arbitration Between
Rebels and Armny
KUALA LUMPUR, Malaysia (.)
-President Sukarno of Indonesia
named a new army commander
yesterday-anti-Communist Maj.
Gen. Suharto, who smashed the
pro-Red coup attempt Sept. 30.

"

PHI KAPPA PSI
LITTLE LE MANS
SORORITY GO-CART RACES
Sponsored by
Kappa Kappa Gamma and Phi Kappa Psi
HOMECOMING WEEKEND SAT., OCT. 16
RIGHT AFTER FOOTBALL GAME
Corner of Washtenaw & Hill

ri

A f't1 ti r

5

-Associated Press
FORMER PRESIDENT DWIGHT D. EISENHOWER berated President Johnson and Congress for
being too concerned with quantity and not enough with quality regarding passage of legislation.
Speaking on his 75th birthday, Eisenhower criticized the present administration for some of its policies.
Ike Hits Johnson Policy, Calls
Student Protests TVery Unwuvoise'

WASHINGTON (A')-Republicans
gathered in 28 cities across the
country last night to toast Dwight
D. Eisenhower on his 75th birth-
day and hear him speak scorn-
fully of legislation "bulled through
just by political power."
"The laws a nation lives by
have to be hammered out by de-
bate, by thoughtful discussion and
by give and take," Eisenhower
said. "They cannot be bulled
through just by political power."
"In legislation," he added, "it
is not how many laws you pass, it
is how many good laws you pass."
Not Good Americanism
At a New York news conference,
Wednesday, he commented on this
weekend's planned student pro-
tests on the governmen't Viet Nam
policy by saying :
"I think it is terrible. Very un-
wise. Not good Americanism."
He said policy decisions on Viet
Nam are based on thousands of
pieces of information which are
analyzed and weighed. Referring
to the demonstrators he said,
"What do they know about it?"
Other GOP leaders, at a coast-
to-coast chain of party fund-
raising dinners, had criticisms of
the present administration.
"Power feeding on power is
being used to undermine our two-
party system under the Johnson
administration," said Republican
National Chairman Ray C. Bliss,
teamed with Barry Goldwater in
Los Angeles.

"Not even a wartime adminig-
tration has had greater power
concentrated in the hands of the
executive branch than is con-
centrated in the White House
today," said Goldwater, the Re-
publican loser to Johnson last
November.
Accuses Johnson
Goldwater accused Johnson of
treating Congress and the people
"as children to be scolded when
bad and fed when good."
In Cleveland, Ohio, Sen.- Thrus-
ton B. Morton of Kentucky charg-
ed the Democrats have "let ex-
tremism play a major role" in
their party.,
"It's the Democrats who sup-
port extremism, morally and with
money-not Republicans," said
Morton, who two weeks ago ac-
cused the John Birch Society of
trying to infiltrate the GOP, and
said its influence should be ousted.
Birchers of the Left
"Birchers of the left," Morton
said, "have a far stronger hold on
the Democrats than any extremists
ever have had or could have had
in our party."
Morton said the Democratic Na-
tional Committee has contributed
$10,000 to an organization called
Group' Research, Inc., which he
said turned out an "addlepated
blacklist" labeling as "right-wing
extremists" such public figures
as Sen. Everett M. Dirksen (R-
Ill), Sen Paul Douglas (D-Ill),
Sen. Thomas Dodd (D-Conn), and
Eisenhower himself.

"I say this is an exercise in
extremism that matches Birch:
pronouncements outrage by out-
rage," Morton said.
Draft To Reach
12 Year High
WASHINGTON (P)-The mili-
tary draft continued to climb
steeply as the armed services ask-
ed yesterday for 45,224 draftees in
December-an increase of 8,774:
over the November call of 36,450.
It is the biggest request to the
Selective Service System since
near the end of the Korean War,
when 53,000 men were inducted
into uniform in May 1953.
The rising calls are in line with
President Johnson's decision to
build up the armed forces to deal
with the conflict in Southeast
Asia and keep needed strength1
elsewhere. Plans are to increase
U.S. forces by 340,000 men, bring-
ing the total to about three mil-
lion.
Yesterday's announced quotas
brings the total of draftees since
September 1950 to 3,243,324.

Suharto, who appears to be
emerging as a strong man, sue-
ceeds Maj. Gen. Achmad Yani,r
who was slain by the pro-Com-
munist rebels.
Sukarno, in statements made to
the official news agency Antara
and broadcast by Radio Jakarta,
noted that since Yani's slaying he
has been in full control of the
army.
The appointment confirmed
Suharto's rise to power since the
coup attempt.
Removes Leftist
Sukarno removed Gen. Pranoto
Reksosamudro, known to be left-
ist inclined, from the top army
post to which he had been named
temporarily by the president
shortly after the coup's collapse.
The Jakarta broadcast made no
mention of Gen. Abdul Haris
Nasution, Sukarno's defense min-
ister and armed forces comman-
der, who presumably continues to
occupy his positions.
Diplomatic sources in Kuala
Lumpur and Singapore, who know
the Indonesian situation, have
rated Dutch-trained Suharto as
a good soldier and possibly the
only commander with enough
backing at present to fight and
beat the Communists.
Acceptable to PKI
Suharto, in his mid 40s, com-
pares with Pranoto, who, diploma-
tic sources said, was first chosen
by Sukarno as army chief im-
mediately after the coup because
he was "fully acceptable to the
PKI," the Indonesian Communist
party.
Suharto has been in the fore-
front of the army's anti-Com-
munist campaign since it flared
with the discoveryofthe bodies
of six top army generals, includ-
ing Yani's, Oct. 4. They had been
apparently tortured by the rebels
before death.
Sukarno had appointed Suharto
to direct the campaign against the
rebels in his Oct. 3 message to
the nation, in which he had nam-
ed Pranoto acting army chief.
This had seemed a demotion for
Suharto at the time, but his name
was repeatedly mentioned in Ja-
karta reports, particularly in con-
nection with the army's anti-
Communist crackdown.

I
r

-. '-
4w4~ whir throug
her swinging campUs lif..
1ead for alI the fun places in this striking green kidskn
pump with black trim accents and museum
heel. . . ifs a smash on campus and entirely in tune
to your switched-on wardrobe. 9.0
I8
U N IVE RS IT Y OFP C A L F OR NIA
L IV ER M OR E, C A L F OR N IA
M O R P~h R OA G R A FOS M £1W AUD E R W AY:
I'
PLOWSHARE-Industrial and scientific uses of
nuclear explosives. WHITNEY-Nuclear weapons
fo" national defense. SH ERWOOD-Power pro-
duction from controlled thermonuclea" reactions.
BiOM EDICAL-The effects of radioactivity on

man and his environment Far-reaching programs
utilizing the skills of virtually every scientific and
technical discipline.
Laboratory staff members will be on campus to
interview Science and Engineering students
Tuesday, October 26
Call your placement office for an appointment.
U. U&Citizenship Required + Equal Opportunity Employer

Psst!

it's time to

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al

World News Roundup

i'I

start his Christmas sweater
NEW PAKS-NEW YARNS-NEW BOOKS
Tel. 662-0303
YARNCRAFT SHOP
I11 NICKELS ARCADE--between State and Maynard

- I

By The Associated Press
PARIS-Three French profes-
sors of the Pasteur Institute re-
ceived a Nobel Prize yesterday for
research in medicine that they
said can aid mankind's campaign
against cancer.
Earlier in the day in Stock-
holm, the Royal Carolina -Insti-
tute Medical College faculty an-
nounced it was awarding the 1965
Nobel Prize for physiology and
medicine to Professors Francois
Jacob, Andree Lwoff, and Jacques
Monod for discoveries concerning
"the genetic control of enzyme
and virus synthesis." The prize is
worth $55,000.
WASHINGTON-A weary Pres-
ident Johnson lazed around his
hospital suite yesterday. Though
his recovery was said to be "com-
ing along fine," an aide reported
Johnson is "weaker than anyone
thought."
Press, secretary Bill D. Moyers
said the President is "gaining his
strength more slowly than any-
one thought."
** *
SAIGON-Thousands of Ameri-
P0n trnnno ithdrew vesterav

important Viet Cong territory. I
The biggest U.S.-Vietnamese
operation of the war ended in the
central highlands, 280 miles north
of Saigon, as 8,000 troops from
the U.S. 1st Air Cavalry Division
began pulling out of the Suai Ca
Valley.

VATICAN CITY-The Vatican
Ecumenical Council yesterday en-
dorsed state aid for parochial
schools and beat down a last-
ditch move to block a declaration
on better Roman Catholic rela-

L

tions with Jews.

I I

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