100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

October 14, 1965 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1965-10-14

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

PAGE EIGHT

TILE MICHIGAN DAILY

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 11,1965

PAGE EIGHT TIlE MICHIGAN DAiLY THURSDAY. OCTOBER 14, 1965

TwiSn
MINNEAPOLIS - ST. PAUL (R)
Jim (Mudcat) Grant, pitching
with only two days rest, squared

Wi1n,

HONORARY PROVES CHALLENGE:
Tie Up eries Club Gives Athletes

SE1E TiHE (AME
UP CLOSET,

4.

first
the
men

pitch 392
left field
on base.

feet and deep
stands with

into ble play, but Tony Oliva kept the Alston ordered Reed to give Qui-
two water boiling with a single to left. lici a free ticket to first, setting
Battey's Bat the stage for Grant.

i nfys tca B F LS-

_t

the World Series for the Minne- A record crowd of 49,578 rose in Earl Battey led off the second The powerful pitcher, who was
sota Twins yesterday by hurling a thunderous ovation to Grant, the with a triple to left center, and one of the Twins' best-hitting
a six-hitter and belting a three- 21-game winner, as he trotted Don Mincher walked, but Osteen pitchers in the regular season play
run homer in a 5-1 sixth-game home. Grant was the first pitch- escaped with a whole hide. with a .155 average, slammed the
victory over. the Los Angeles er to hit a homer in the Series Again in the third, Osteen was first pitch. into the wildly cheer-
Dodgers. since Lew Burdette did it for in trouble when he walked Ver- ing fans in the left field pavilion.
Grant's triumph, the Twins' Milwaukee, Oct. 2, 1958. It was salles on a 3-2 pitch, but the next It was Grant's very first homer
third in three games at Metro- the first by an American League three went quickly. of the year, and he wouldn't sell
pitcher since old Jim Bagby for k Third Pitch of it fr$10,000-the amount he can
Cleveland in 1920. 'Dick Tracewski, playing second i o 1 0-h muth a
Fairly Stars for the injured Lefebvre, messed r ,:
Fa ly ars . up Battey's leadoff grounder in 1%%%%
Grant, beaten Sunday in the 'PBte' edf rudii
forath gmewen hendas knke the fourth. Allison, who had struck
fourth game when he was knockedout earlier and had only one hit
out in the sixth inning, came back in 10 trips, ripped into Osteen's
strong as though he had a month's third pitch and drove it into the
rest. He had a no-hitter goig lower pavilion in left for the two-
until Ron Fairly opened the fifth run homer that really won the
Switha single to center. ball game.
Fairly's seventh-inning home bl ae
Osteen had been getting behind
run ruined Grant's bid for a the hitters, and his pitches were .
shutout, but the big fellow never high instead of in his usual low-
faltered.brehkingtgrofns.l
After Lou Johnson singled for g g
the sixth hit with two gone in Commander
Grant was in command all the
the ninth, Grant retired the Dodg- way. The Dodgers never got a
e y i e r r chance to use the speed that prac-
out to Frank Quilici. The entire tically ran the Twins out of the '°{<.f
Twins' bench came out to greet park in Los Angeles. Only once,
the 30-year-old right-hander as in the sixth when Tracewski and
he walked off the hill. Maury Wills singled, did they have
Osteen Beaten two on base at the same time..
Osteen, who never before had The second guessers will have
BOB ALLISON lost to the Twins in his days with a field day with Walter Alston,
Washington and the Dodgers, fin- Dodger manager, for his move in JIM KAAT
politan Stadium after losing three ally dropped his first decision to walking the weak-hitting rookie
straight in Los Angeles threw the the Minnesota sluggers after beat- Quilici in the sixth to pitch to make if the Twins follow through
Series into a decisive seventh ing them six times. Grant. and win the seventh game.
game today. So far, it, has been The crafty lefty had shut out the Strong Play Kaat Tomorrow
a home park series. Twins in Los Angeles in the third Parker had made a superb play Twins' Manager Sam Mele nam-
Grant, Allison Homer game last Saturday 4-0. to throw out leadoff man Battey ed left-hander Jim Kaat to start
Bob Allison's two-run homer off The Twins started out making in the sixth, but Allison walked. the seventh game, but Walter Al-
Claude Osteen in the fourth gave life miserable for Osteen in the Reed, who had just replaced Os- ston of the Dodgers refused to
the muscular Grant the margin very first inning when Zoilo Ver- teen at the start of the inning, pick a pitcher, saying he would not
he needed. Then he came up in salles led off with a single. He curled a third strike past Don decide until today between right-
the sixth and blasted Howie Reed's was erased on Joe Nossek's dou- Mincher. hander Don Drysdale and left-
--__ ---hander Sandy Koufax.
SPORTS NIGHT EDITOR:
RICK STERN

By MARTY LIEBERMAN
Sigma Delta Psi, the national
honorary athletic fraternity, may
not be the most widely heralded
fraternal organization on campus,
but it is without a doubt the hard-
est to pledge. Last year seven
physical education majors and
varsity athletes competed for
membership to the club, but none
were able to meet the require-
ments.
Tests
Applicants must pass the fol-
lowing 15 tests:
1. 100-yd. dash 11 3 5 sec.
2. 120-yd. low hurdles 16 sec.
3. Running high jump about 5 ft.
4. Running broad jump 17 ft.
5. 16 lb. shot put 30 ft.
6. 20-ft, rope climp 12 see.
7. Baseball throw 250 ft.
or Javelin throw 130 ft.
8. Football punt 120 ft.
9. 100-yd. swim 1 min. 45 sec.
10. 1 mile run 6 min.

the 1920's. He acted as national
president during the early fifties,
and looks back on four decades of
close contact with Sigma Delta.
"None of the tests are really dif-
ficult, but all together they make
a rough exam. The toughest events
are usually rope climbing and the
hand stand, but this differs for
each athlete."
Before the expansion of the Uni-
versity I-M program to include 36
sports, Sigma Delta Psi was a
popular intramural activity. So-
cial fraternities and dormitories
would compete to qualify the most
members. In recent years, how-
ever, interest has waned and few
athletes even compete.
90 Chapters
Ninety colleges and universities
across the nation have Sigma Del-
ta Psi chapters, and an award is
presented annually to the school
which produces the most mem-
bership. Records are reviewed at
the national office at the Uni-
versity of Minnesota by national
director, Pat Mueller, the head ofj
the Minnesota I-M program.
Do you think you can qualify
for Sigma Delt? Give it a try.
Go down to the I-M building. Look
around in the lobby and you'll
see the list of members. Keep on
walking and you'll find Earl Ris-
key's office. Ask for an applica-
tion. Good luck.

BI3 NOCULAR
with a full 361 ft. field of view
Now with
FOLDA-WAY
Soft EYE CUPS!
See a demonstration today!
ONLY
$2 95
n

Brings action, things and people
"almost close enough to touch"

11. Front hand spring, landing'
on feet
12. Hand Stand1
13. Fence Vault chin
14. Good Posture, Stahdard B.
(H.B.M.)

10 sec.
in high

15. Scholarship Varsity Eligibility
Tryouts are judged by the
coaches of the freshman varsity
teams and employes of the I-M
office.
Director of intramurals, Earl
Riskey, is adviser to the Michi-
gan chapter of Sigma Delta Psi.
Riskey won his fraternity key in

If you wear eye-glasses, or sun glasses,
or if you'll use your binoculars in cold or wet
weather . . . you'll enjoy this new, wonderful
SCOPE INSTRUMENT feature. The soft eye
cups fold away neatly when using glasses -
snap out instantly for ordinary use. So easy on
the eyes-so comfortable for continuous
viewing. You'll use this precision- SCOPE
INSTRUMENT binocular - wherever you go
for Sports, Nature Study, Travel and general
observation of distant objects.

i
's
1
i
a

EXCLUSIVE
A new, practical Binocular Case... this
SCOPE INSTRUMENT patented leather case protects
and p-2 bons Binoculars for instant use is included.

Ann Arbor's Largest Selection of Binoculars...
QUARRYPHT

318 S. State St.
761-2011

2215 W. Stadium Blvd.
665-0621

OPEN MON. Thru SAT. 'Til 9:30

p.E
LIEC~

302 S. State St.

Ann Arbor, Mich.

Neither rain
norsnow
nor heat
nor Lip
r.2

4

SUBSCRIBE

TO THE
MICHIGAN DAILY

I

r

I

i>' ;,
''s,
' !'<

Ed

]! 'r

LAM

Toronado
will get you
if you don't
watch out!

MOBVIESMIumm

4.

R? :

-

->=1

I

M ;.

- ;

a
rS
_
4.

can ever
wrinkle
hi s
Press-Free
Post-Grads
Nothing puts a crease in
these pants where a crease
doesn't belong. They hold
their crisp, neat look hour-
after hour. No matter how
often they get washed, they
never, ever need ironing.
Trimly tapered with belt
loops and cuffs. Colors and
fabrics for casual and dress
wear. 65% Dacron) polyes-
ter/35% cotton, $6.98. Flan-
nphz Ic hrin-cnr ldna rpv T

1

*

Don't look now. But a keen machine called Toronado has designs on you. Out to get you
with a new way of going-front wheel drive-thai puts the traction where the action is!
Extra stretch-out room for six. (Flat floors, you know.) Full-view side windows.
Draft-free ventilation. Many other swinging etceteras! Like we say, Toronado has
designs on you. Or is it the other way around! LOOK TO OLDS FOR TJiE NEW!

Right as rain, and in sunshine, too"-
All Weather Coat

OF=

Mathematically, you'll be wearing this all

-4VD)1T VD[)A TI

. . TO7RONADO * NINETY- EIGHT~ DELTA 8$ DYNAI44 8 JET$7TA 88 GlTLA55 ",F-85 ,>VISTA.-CR(USE "TAFIE 44

1

S

I

Back to Top

© 2017 Regents of the University of Michigan