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October 14, 1965 - Image 3

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1965-10-14

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THURSDAY, OCTOBER 14, 1965

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

THRSAYlCTBE.1,19.' .a 11V111<1p £H1 #/ £ a ma

PAGE THREE

shombe Ousted in New Congo Crisis

11 1

LEOPOLDVILLE, The Congo VP) fight for independence from Leo-
-Moise Tshombe is out and one poldville rule that was finally
of his old associates in the Ka- crushed by troops of the United
tanga secession is in as premier of Nations on Jan. 1, 1963.
the Congo by decree of President He has since founded his own
Joseph Kasavubu yesterday. party, the Balubakat.
Kasavubu dismissed Tshombe's He is a onetime foreman on the
15-month-old government as not cross-Congo railroad who studied
conforming to the Congo's "con- law, sociology and political econ-
stitutional norms, the election re- omy as avenues into politics. His
sults or the imperative political working relations with Tshombe
equilibriums" and named Evar- were long close, despite the fact
isted Kimba, 39, to form a new one. they are from traditionally hostile
This settled at least temporar- tribes. Tshombe. is of the Lunda
ily a difference between the chief tribe; Kimba is a Baluba.
of state and the chief of govern- Senators of Kimba's Balubakat
ment of this troubled African na- party have aligned themselves
tion as to tenure. with Tshombe, but he has chos-
Tshombe, who was brought back en to remain independent since he
from exile in July 1964 to help was elected to the National As-
cope with rebellion, popular un- sembly last. April. In fact he was
rest and financial difficulties, had not present yesterday.
said he should remain in office as Rivalry Causes Shakeup
long as Kasavubu did. Kasavubu The shakeup came after a per-
said Tshombe would stay only as iod of intense rivalry between
long as he wanted him. Tshombe and his interior minis-
Kimba! ter, Victor Nendaka.
Kimba is a deputy from North Nendaka, for five years head of
Katanga who was a founder mem- the national security police, has
ber of Tshombe's Conakat politi- emerged as one of the most pow-
cal party and his foreign minis- erful Congolese politicians since
ter during the Katanga Province he resigned that post to win elec-
Indonesia
Fears Con
JAKARTA, Indonesia () - An ian colonel was seeking, the source
informed source reports that the reported, was communications
Indonesian army has sent one of equipment considered necessary to
its emissaries to Washington to secure control of islands other
seek U.S. help in containing a than Java and Sumatra. Indo-
Communist threat to mount civil nesia is a chain of several thou-
war in Indonesia's farflung is- sand islands peopled by 103 mil-
lands. lion persons.
The dispatch of a full colonel These islands would be highly
representing Maj. Gen. Suharto, vulnerable to arms smuggling op-
the chief of the Indonesian army's erations, and there are fears that
strategic command, could indicate arms might be' sent into them to
that the army generals do not set up Communist bases for what
trust anyone connected with the eventually could be a guerrilla
regime of President Sukarno and war against the army command in
his first deputy, Subandrio. Java.
Subandrio, as foreign minister, Washington Balks
would have peopled embassies It was reported the request has
abroad with his own representa- run into a snag i Washington,,
tives. A special military emissary which would want firm assurances
would indicate an end-run around that any sort of military help
people who would reflect the views would not be used against Indo-
of the anti-American and Chinese- nesia's neighbor, the Malaysian
leaning Subandrio. Federation.
Principally, what the Indones- For the time being, at least, it

tion as a national deputy. Against
Tshombe's "government of public
safety," he has called for a "cab-
inet of national union."
There had been speculation that
Kasavubu would dissolve the gov-
ernment and then call on Tshom-
be to form a new one with the
understanding he would include
some men from Nendaka's "Con-
golese Democratic Front."
But the president chose another
course.
He announced the changes in a
state of the union speech to a
joint session of Parliament. There
were boos from about half the
deputies and senators. Only Nen-
daka's supporters applauded.
Tshombe 'has held half a dozen
cabinet portfolios. Kasavubu said
the concentration had been nec-
essary to restore a measure of
normal life, but is now a handi-
cap to "effective control of ad-
ministrative activities."
Troops took up positions outside
all public buildings and checked
passes. But the capital was calm
and the people were taking the
attitude of "leave politics to the
politicians."

GUILD HOUSE
-802 MONROE
FRIDAY, OCT. 15, NOON LUNCHEON 25c
SPEAKER: BARRY BLUESTONE, PRES. U. OF M.
STUDENT EMPLOYEES' UNION
"REASONS & HOPES FOR U. OF M.
STUDENT EMPLOYEES' UNION"

~,

Specialists in Office Supplies II

665-9141

il' ~llll

OPQIL

-Associated Press
Congolee President Joseph Kasavubu (left) yesterday dismissed Premier Moise Tshombe (right)
and formed a new government.

uiI

STATE ST*sinlce 1908

r

. .

Seeks

U.S.

Aid;

Aft
UA(94)

munist

Threat

appears that if such a request were
made by an Indonesian army rep-
resentative in Washington, he re-
turned empty-handed. The U.S.
State Department still appears to
be waiting for the smoke to clear
in Indonesia and some firm indi-
cation of what elements are in
control.
There is every indication now
that the army is running the In-
donesian show, with no one man
holding complete power, although
much authority seems to be in the
hands of Maj. Gen. Suharto. Dis-
patches from Jakarta point to a
combination of generals-a junta
-with men like Suharto and Ab-
dul Haris Nasution, the armed
forces chief, at its head.
Sukarno
Loss of power by Sukarno seems
to have been confirmed in the
latest developments. A government
official pictured him as consid-

ering plans to establish a new
Communist party leaning away
from Red China. But the army
still permitted mobs to sack Com-
munist installations, and army of-
ficials 'have told correspondents
that any "new-style" Communist
party also should be crushed.
Young demonstrators stoned
and sacked a Red youth head-
quarters here yesterday in sup-
port of the army's anti-Commu-
nist campaign, reputed now to
have the tacit approval of Presi-
dent Sukarno.
About 2000 strong, the mob
smashed windows, seized docu-
ments and broke furniture in the
Communist youth hall only 100
yards from Sukarno's palace. The
hall has been a traditional gath-
ering place for anti-Western street.
demonstrations.

As in other such raids since
Moslem youths burned the head-
quarters of the Indonesian Com-
munist party-PKI-here last Fri-
day, the demonstrators shouted,
for destruction of the party and
the death .of its fugitive leader,
D. N. Aidit. -
"Hang Aidit!" they cried.
"Crush the PKI!"
They made a bonfire of the doc-
uments and broken furniture.
Troops nearby watched without
interfering. Palace guards moved
in with fixed bayonets and bioke
it up when it seemed the demon-
strators might get out of hand.
Sukarno, who has played the
Communists against the army to
balance political forces in Indo-
nesia, had excused the Conimu-
nists in the Sept. 30 attempted
coup. Yet the army announced
that It had his "tacit" approval
for its anti-Communist campaign.

Is Happy To Announce the Selection of
PATRICIA McCARTY
and
THOMAS SHERMAN
as General Co-Chairmen of Winter Weekend '66
CONGRATULATIONS !

TODAY

CF

- ----

World News
Roiundp
By The Associated Press
WASHINGTON-A study of the
effectiveness of the voting rights
law and other civil rights legisla-
tion was ordered yesterday by a
House Judiciary subcommittee.
Investigations in the South -of
compliance with the new voting
registration procedures will be
made by a special three-member
subcommittee.
There have been increasing
complaints to Congress that the
Justice Department has failed to
move vigorously enough in send-
ing federal registrars into the
South to register Negroes.
AN KHE, South Viet Nam --
The biggest U.S.-Vitnamese oper-
ation of the war came to a vir-
tual end in South Viet Nam's
highlands Yesterday and the
American commander declared it
a success.
Thirty-four Viet Cong were re-
ported killed and 93 others cap-
tured in the four-day operation
280 miles northeast of Saigon.
KEY WEST, Fla. - Bravingj
angry seas in small craft yester-
day, 102 more Cubans crossed the
Florida Straits to freedom in the
United States. Stormy weather at
Camarioca, where Fidel Castro
opened a door from the Commu-
nist stronghold, may have delay-
ed other sailings.
The U.S. continued efforts to
work out an orderly method of ad-
mitting refugees to this country'
and received a Castro govern-
ment reply which was reported
"positive in some respects."
* * *
WASHINGTON-Sen. Robert F.
Kennedy urged yesterday that Red
China be invited to Join the dis-!
armament talks In Geneva when
they resume in January to make
them more "meaningful" by in-
cluding all the nuclear powers.
He said this country must "en-
list the held of the United Na-
tions, and all other nations-in-
cluding Communist China--in an
effort to prevent nuclear catas-
trophe."

-e
October 18

.___ _.._
- _
-° ---
E ',
,,

is the DEADLINE

for submitting material for
the next issue of

II
,
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'I.

ON-CAMPUS SALE DAY
9:00-5:00
ON DIAG AND AT CORNER OF NORTH U. & STATE STREETS
See student representatives for sales coupons
UNIVERSITY PLAYERS
PLAYBILL 1965166
HENRY VI, Parts I, II, III
by William Shakespeare
In repertory November 17 through December 5
Trueblood Auditorium
THE DAYS BETWEEN
by Robert Anderson
Prior to Broadway by arrangement with the American Playwrights Theatre
February 2-5
Trueblood Auditorium

generation

Ili

-Associated Press
This Communist Youth Headquarters, which in the past had
been a staging area for leftist demonstrations, was sacked yes-
terday by anti-Communist Moslem demonstrators in Jakarta,
Indonesia's capital.
Ui

a

On Hashanna Rabbi
Sunday, October 17, from 3-5 p.m.

I

11

PREMIERE
PRODUCTION
in cooperation with the
Department of English
February 16-19
Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre

ROSALINDA
The Max Reinhardt version of
Die Fledermaus by Johann Strauss
in cooperation with the
Opera Department
March 16-19
Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre

SUKKOT OPEN HOUSE
at HILLEL
Program includes:

NAGILA DANCERS

- HILLEL CHOIR

Enjoy the SUKKA and Refreshments

All Are Welcome

1419 Hill Street

PEER GYNT
by Henrik Ibsen
The American version by Paul Green
April 6-9
Trueblood Auditorium
ALL PERFORMANCES 8:00 P.M.
SEASON TICKETS: $6.75, $4.50
plus 25c for each ticket for each Friday or Saturday performance
E "'ti R f V

You, too (Not just Clarence)

I

nw rww ... .. e.. .. ... . . , .... . ,

I

11

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