100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

October 02, 1965 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1965-10-02

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

PAGE TWO

TUE MICHIGAN DAILY

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 2, 1955

PAGE TWO TUE MICIHOAN DAILY ~ATI~RI)AY. ACTORFR ~ 1fli~

V4A A. V~7 AVAF4A 1 y W %.i A VA7AiAV N? A.UV

V

Sinatra-Martin Movie Stranded
Saving Marriage' from Rocks

VINTAGE HITCHCOCK:
Rebecca' a Superb
Romantic Thriller

Committee Outlines

By STEVEN HALLER

At The Michigan Theater
Any husband who's fed up with
hearing his wife scream at him
about the man she could have
married might derive some amuse-
ment from "Marriage on the
Rocks," now at the Michigan
Theatre, although other viewers
may find the laughs a bit strained
at times.
Nevertheless, the newest Frank
Sinatra-Dean Martin collabora-
tion may be recommended as a
pleasant little diversion with a few
sharp digs at modern-daydivorce
laws stuck in here and there.
In a nutshell, the story concerns
a bored wife (Deborah Kerr) who
wants a divorce from Hubby (Si-
natra); but, persuaded to go to
Mexico on a "second honeymoon"
instead, she talks him into going
along against his better judgment.
once there, an argument, follow-
ed by a quickie divorce, is in turn
followed by a phone call sum-

moning Sinatra back to an impor-
tant business transaction; but be-
fore he leaves they are reconciled
and a gala remarriage festivity is
planned.
Finally, Sinatra finds he can't
make it in time for their second
wedding so he sends his best
friend (Martin) who also used to
be Miss Kerr's old boyfriend and
who has been around all 19 years
of her married life saying he
wishes she had married him in-
stead. Sure enough his wish comes
true when the Spanish justice of
the peace mistakes him for Si-
natra and pronounces him and
Miss Kerr man and wife.
This unexpected turn of events'
puts a damper on the ensuing
festivities, and Miss Kerr and
Martin, who's suffering from all
manner of illnesses, ride off to
the airport in an ambulance with
a "Just Married" sign on the back.
The rest of the movie shows how
Sinatra likes, being a bachelor
again. Martin likes being married
to his old flame (and vice versa)

and various other minor charac-
ters like whatever it is they're
supposed to like at this point in
the plot. Finally the soap-opera
finish comes tripping gaily in,
and (with a sigh of relief) all
concerned call it a day.
Deano and Frankie seem to be
having a good time considering
the profundity of their scripts;
for all I know they were even paid
for their troubles. Deborah Kerr
doesn't have any heavy acting to
worry about, so she can relax too.
Alongside these pros, the young-
sters look rather insecure:Nancy
Sinatra joins Daddy (she plays
his daughter in the movie, too-
an inspired bit of casting!); but
she manages to squeeze by with
a minimum of acting, probably{
saving her strength for bigger and
better things. Tony Bill, of course,
debuted with Sinatra in "Come
Blow Your Horn"; here he's given
far less to do, and what he does
isn't very funny.
As an afternoon's entertain-
ment, or for the chance to see
Deano and Frankie playing them-
selves, "Marriage on the Rocks"
is easygoing fare, but I wouldn't
recommend it for an evening date;
there are too many pretty girls to
distract the fellovys, and anyway
a whole buck and a quarter is a
bit steep for this one.

By ALAN J. GLUECKMAN
At The Cinema Guild
If you've wanted to return to
Manderly again, then hike on over
to the Cinema Guild tonight or
tomorrow and revisit with Alfred
Hitchcock's venerable "Rebecca."
After making a long successful
string of British thrillers, David
Selznick, imported Hitchcock to
the United States in 1940 to make
a film, and what a film it is! From
its extraordinary cast (Laurence
Olivier, Joan Fontaine, Judith
Anderson and George Sanders) to
its remarkably fluid camera work,
"Rebecca" is a work of art fash-
ioned with care and love by a man
who is the master of his medium.
There is Manderly, the wonder-
fully gothic old English manor
that is always the setting for such
stories.
Then there is Rebecca, the title
figure, who never appears in the
movie. As the first Mrs. deWinter,
she has already died from myster-
ious circumstances before the film
begins.
However, her presence, malevo-
lent and often threatening, makes
itself felt on numerous occasions

after Laurence Olivier brings
Joan Fontaine home to Manderly
as his second wife.
Hitchcock s k ill f u 11 y builds
an undercurrent of apprehension
through attention to details of
character. The shy, retiring Joan
F o n t a i n e. A monstrous - sized
house. A strong-willed housekeep-
er, Mrs. Danvers, who appears
half the time to be in communion
with another world. And the dom-
inating presence of the first Mrs.
deWinter, Rebecca herself. It all
leads, via blackmail and a trial,
to a typcially Hitchcockian climax.
The acting, needless to say, is
uniformly superb. The camera
work and direction are a perfect
blend of Hitchcock's taut, eco-
nomical films of the Thirties and
the romantic - suspense style he
adopted in the Forties.
As Olivier recalls his last en-
counter with his first wife, the
camera moves around the room
picking up and isolating little ob-
jects she owned that describe her
character completely.
If you're tired of silly comedies
and have already caught "The
Collector," take in "Rebecca." It's
got drama, suspense and great
acting. What more can you ask of
a film these days?

1 1
I 1
* I
ACADEMY AWARD WINNER
, 1 1
* I
1, 1
i 1
I i
* I
1
S1
1 I
- SIR : NEOLVE
I U
1 1
* I
R becca II
« 1
1 1
I
I "
OANM FSONAPINE ENS
* I
* INITHE ARIC EAUDITORIUM
1 1
1 #
wrwrwrwwsrwwrwIsrwwrswwwwr

DA.ILY OFFICIAL BULLI
I. ..: a"Y :r, .a: ..s{r '} :?:"f::'.n : > Y". . . . +

The Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publication of the Univer-
sity of Michigan, for which The
Michigan Daily assumes no editor-
ial responsibility. Notices should be
sent in TYPEWRITTEN form to
Room 3564 Administration-Bldg. be-
fore 2 p.m. of the day preceding
publication, and by 2 p.m. Friday
for Saturday and Sunday. General
Notices may be published a maxi-
mum of two times on request; Day
Calendar items appear once only.
Student organization notices are not
accepted for publication.
SATURDAY, OCTOBER 2
Day Calendar
Football-U-M vs. Georgia: Michigan
Stadium, 1:30 p.m.
Professional Theatre Program Per-
formance-APA company in "You Can't
Take It With You": Mendelssohn Thea-
tre, 2:30 and 8 p.m.
Cinema Guild-"Rebecca" Architec-
ture Aud., 7 and 9 p.m.
School of Music Degree Recital -
Robert Probasco, oboeist: Recital Hall,
School of Music, 7 p.m.
General Notices
Doctoral Examination for Philip S.
Dauber, Communication Sciences; thes-
is: "Errors in Finite Automata," Sat.,
Oct. 2, 2084 E. Engrg. Bldg., at 9
a.m. Chairman, R. F. Arnold.
FINAL EXAMINATION SCHEDUDE
1966-Winter Term
Advance Classification for the Win-
ter Term will be held durin Octo-
ber, November and December. The
following Final Examination Schedule
is printed for the information of stu-
dents who will be attending classes
during the Wnter Term. Save this
schedule for future reference.
College of Literature, Science
and the Arts
Horace H. Rackham School of Graduate
Studies
College of Architecture and Design
School of Business Administration
School of Natural Resources j
School of Public Health
College of Engineering
College of Pharmacy
School of Education
School of Nursing
School of Music
April 20-26, 1966
For courses having both lectures and
recitations the "time of class" is the
time of the first lecture period of
the week. For courses having recita-
tions only the "time of class" is the
time of the first, recitation period.
Certain courses will be examined at
special periods as noted. Classes be-
ginning on the half hour will be sched-
uled at the preceding hour.
Courses not included in either the
regular schedule or the special periods
will select examination code letter Z.
Code letter Z designates that the
examination period is to be arranged
by the instructor and the class. Each
student should receive notification
from his instructor as to the time and
place of his examination.
If any student is assigned four
examinations in the same day, the
University Final Examination Sched-
uling Committee will request reas-
signment if so desired by the student.
The final examinations for English
123 and 220 are scheduled before the
formal examination period by special
arrangement for the purpose of avoid-
ing scheduling conflicts for many stu-
dents during the regular examination
week
REGULAR SCHEDULE
Monday
Time Examination
of Class Code Letter
( 7:30........................X
( 8:00 ........................... A
( 9:00......................... B
(10:00 .......................C
(11:(10 ........................... D
(120 ........................... Q
( 2:00 ...........................FG
( :00 ............................G
(43:00 ....................... RG
( 4:0 .. ....:.. .... .... .... ..

Tuesday

( 7:30
( 8:00
( 9:00
(10:00
(11:00
(12:00
( 1:00
( 2:00
( 3:00
( 4:00

Y
H
I
J
K
S
M
N
P
T

402
Russian 352
Spanish 101,

102, 103, 221, 231, 232

Code
Lette

SPECIAL PERIODS
Each course, except English 123 and
220, requiring a special examination is3
assigned two examination code letters.
If one is preferred by the depart-
ment, it is underlined; students may
elect the other only if a conflict oc-
curs and special permission is secured
from the department.
School of Business Administration
Examination
Course Code Letter
Accounting 271, 500 G, W
Accounting 272, 501 Q, V-
Business Admin. 306, 506 P T;
Business Admin. 450 R, X'
Industrial Relations 300, 500 W, Y
Marketing 300, 301, 500, 501 G, U
Finance 301 V, X
Statistics 505 S, X
Statistics 311, 511 O, V
College of Engineering
Eng. Graphics 101 K, W
Eng. Graphics 102, 104 U, V
College of Literature, Science c
and the Artst
Chemistry 106 R, Y
Economics 201, 202, 203, 204, 401 O, X
Economics 271 G, W
Economics 272 Q, V
English 123, 220 L
French 101, 102, 203, 111, 112, 221,
231, 232, 361, 362 O, P
German 101, 102, 111, 231, 232, 236 T, V
Italian 101, 102 T, V2
Latin 222, 231 P, U
Mathematics 115, 215, 315 W, XI
Mathematics, 116, 316 W, X
Physics 154 Z r
Russian 101, 102, 201, 202, 302,

A
B
C
DI
E
F
G
H
I
J
K
L
M
N
O
P
Q
R
S
T
U
V
W
X
Y
Z

EXAMINATION TIMES BY
CODE LETTERS
e Time
er Day C. Campus-N. Campus
Wed., April 20 8-10 7:30-9:30
Thurs., April 21 8-10 7:30-9:30
Fri., April 22 8-10 7:30-9:30
Sat., April 23 8-10 7:30-9:30
Mon., April 25 8-10 7:30-9:30
Tues., April 26 8-10 7:30-9:30
Thurs., April 21 4-6 4:30-6:30
Sat., April 23 4-6 4:30-6:30
Mon., April 25 4-6 4:30-6:30
Tues., April 26 4-6 4:30-6:30
Wed., April 2'0 4-6 4:30-6:30
Tues., April 19 2-4
Sat., Apr 23 10:30-12:30 10:30-12:30
Tues., A 26 10:30-12:30 10:30-12:30
Tues., Apr 26 1:30-3:30 1:30-3:30
Thurs A 21 10:30-12:30 10:30-12:30
Wed., A 20 10:30-12:30 10:30-12:30
Fri., April 22 4-6 4:30-6:30.
Mon., A 25 10:30-12:30 10:30-12:30
Fri., Apr 22 10:30-12:30 10:30-12:30
Wed., Apr 20 1:30-3:30 1:30-3:303
Thurs., A 21 1:30-3:30 1:30-3:30
Fri., April 22 1:30-3:30 1:30-3:30
Sat., April 23 1:30-3:30 1:30-3:30
Mon., Apr 25 1:30-3:30 1:30-3:30
To be arranged.
. . *

(Continued from Page 1)
abroad. Today there are over 1400
and 2000 are expected by 1975.
Cost: $2 million.
* University Concert Hall-an
auditorium on North Campus to
be closely associated with the
School of Music, which needs a
hall in which to present its many
performances, but available also
for other University purposes.
Cost: $.25 million.
Endowed Professorships
f Endowed chairs-more en-
dowed professorships in every de-
partment and at all levels, of
which there are only eight at
present, to aid the University in
the worldwide competition for
teachers. Cost per chair: $500,000.
0 Graduate Library-a net in-
crease of 600,000 volumes in open
stacks; 500 carrels and areas for
maps, papyri, manuscripts and
microfilm reading to meet the
needs of faculty and graduate
students. This project is given
high priority in the list of ob-
jectives. Cost: $4,375,000 with a
balance of $2,917,000 that must be
obtained from other sources.
* Faculty-Alumni Center - to
perform a unifying function with-
in the University, since as de-
partments grow there is a ten-
dency for faculty to divide. The
University is one of the few which
does not have a faculty club of
some kind except for a room in
the Union, "which has been out
ETI N
Main & Catherine. To take test ques-
tionnaire must be completed. Details
and applications available at Bureau
of Appointments.
POSITION OPENINGS:
Smithsonian Institution, Cambridge,
Mass.-Positions available for grads
as observers with the Astrophysical
Observatory.
State of. Washington, Olympia
Systems Programmer. BS plus 2 yrs.
exper. MS may be substituted for 1
yr. exper. Additional exper. qualifies
for higher rating.
TRW, Michigan Div., Warren, Mich.
-Engr. with exper. in metal working
Indust. for Indust. Engrg. dept. Supv.
methods & plant layout section of de-
partment,
Community Activities, Inc., aWter-
ford, Mich.-Executive Director. Degree
in . Recreation for non-profit corp.
providing recreational facilities for
area residents. Exper. pref.
* * wr
For further information, please call
764-7460, General Div., Bureau of Ap-
pointments, 3200 SAB.
ENGINEERING PLACEMENT INTER-
VIEWS-Seniors & grad students, please
sign schedule posted at 128-H West
Engrg.
THURS., OCT. 7-
Brunswick Corp., Corp.-wide - BS-
MS: EE, IE & ME. R. & D., Des.
Carpenter Steel Co., Reading, Pa.-
BS-MS: Metal. Dec. grads. Citizens
& non-citizens becoming a citizen. R.
& D.
Digitek Corp., Los Angeles, Calif. -
BS-MS: E Math, Math & Physics. Pro-
-ramming - Make appointments at
Bureau of Appointments, 3200 SAB.
Eaton Manufacturing Co., Michigan,
Ohio, Wis., Ill., Pa., N.Y. & Interna-
tional-BS-MS: EE, IE, ME & Met. MS:
Info. & Controls. BS: E Physics. R. &
D., Des., Prod., Sales.
The Louis Allis Co., Milwaukee, Wis.
-BS, MS, Prof.: EE. BS-MS: EM, IE,
ME. Citizens & non-citizens becoming
U.S. citizen. Dev., Des., Prod., Sales,
Manufacturing.
Reliance Electric & Engrg. Co., All
Locations-B-MS:DEE ME, B: EM,
E Physics, IE. R. & D., Des., ales.
Upjohn Co., Kalamazoo, Mich. &
North Haven, Conn.-(Carwin Div.)-
Any Degree: ChE. BS-MS: ME. Citizens
& non-citizens becoming a citizen. R.'
& D., Dev., Des. & Prod.
THURS.-FRI., OCT. 7-8-
American Oil Co. & Amco Chemicals
Corp., Whiting, Ind.-Any Degree: ChE
& ME. R. & D.

BEER-PIZZA-BANJOS
BIMBO'S

SATURTAY, OCT. 2
2:30 and 8:00 p.m. - The Pro-
fessional Theatre Program pre-
sents the APA company in "You
Can't Take It with You" at the
Mendelssohn Theater.
7 and 9 p.m. - The Cinema
Guild presents "Rebecca" in the
Architecture Auditorium.
SUNDAY, OCT. 3
2 p.m.-Wind instrument stu-
dents in the School of Music will
give a recital in the Recital Hall,
School of Music.
2:30 and 8:00 p.m.-The Pro-
fessional Theatre Program pre-
sents the APA company in "You
PHONE 483-4680
? ~Enotw.e Or CARPENTER ROAD
NOW SHOWING
i WILLIAM ICASTLE'S

Can't Take It with You" at the
Mendelssohn Theater.
4:30 p.m. - Members of the
School of Music will .give a Vocal
Chamber Music Recital in the
Recital Hall, School of Music.
7 and 9 p.m.-The Cinema Guild
presents "Rebecca" in the Archi-
tecture Auditorium.
ENDS TONIGHT

of date for some time and receives
only occasional usage from a very
small percentage of the Univer-
sity's faculty." Cost: $1,700,000.
Scholarship Money
* Student support by way of
scholarships and fellowships -
money is badly needed in the
humanities and social sciences,
since government and industry are
generous in support of science.
Although scholarships and grad-
uate fellowships are often donat-
ed annually, usual gifts for this
purpose are endowments to be
held in trust with income dis-
tributed annually for the purposes
named. Cost: an endowment of
$50,000 will support several schol-
arships and an endowment of
$80,000 will support a graduate
fellowship.
" Phoenix Project-support of
research projects which would not
initially qualify for grants from
the outside, projects originating
in the minds of faculty and staff.
For example, the bubble chamber,
which has contributed greatly to
the 'study of atomic nuclei, was
invented by a University faculty
member with an initial investment
of $750. Cost: $2 million.
! Foreign and comparative law
-need for more highly-trained
specialists in this special branch
of law to enable students to un-

L' Projects
derstand other and different legal
systems which is important due to
America's increasing involvement
in world affairs. Cost: $4 million.
Residential Colleges
* Residential colleges-to an-
swer the problems created by great
size and provide a means of treat-
ing the undergraduate as an in-
dividual and not simply as a num-
ber in a record-keeping process.
Cost: estimated in the multi-
million-dollar bracket.
* Continuing Education for
Women-to provide women, for
whom higher education was inter-
rupted by marriage and parent-
hood, with an opportunity to
reach their goals and assist them
in acquiring skills in important
fields for which women are par-
ticularly suited such as teaching,
social work, library management
and the health sciences. Cost:
$255,000.
" Rare Book Library-house
the collection on the eighth floor
of the new Graduate Library
Building. Cost $500,000.
Social Research
* Institute for Social Research
-funds for completing the Insti-
tute's new building on Thompson
Street and money for certain spe-
cialized facilities and equipment
essential to IRS's program. Cost:
$1,020,000.

'4

Across Campus

A

No date of examination may be
changed without the consent of the
University Final Examination Schedul-
ing Committee. Questions concerning
the schedule should be directed to
Edward G. Groesbeck, 1500 Adminis-
tration Bldg.
Placement
ANNOUNCEMENT:
Peace Corps Placement Test-Deter-
mines in what capacity you can best
serve. Tests will be held Oct. 9, Nov. 13
& Dec. 6 this semester. Test Sat., Oct.
9 at 9 a.m. at Downtown Post Office,

st"'°JOAN CRAWFORD
JOHN IRELAND * LEIF ERICKSON
Shown at 7:10 & 10:30
PLUS-
ANN* :,
MARGRET :
MICHAEL
PARKS
Shown at 8:50 Only
2 CARTOONS AT 7:00
BOX OFFICE OPENS 6:30

COLUMBIA PICTURES
presents
WILLIAM
WYLER'S
the ollecto
TERENCE STAMP
SAMANTHA EGGAR
TECHNICOtOR0
-SUNDAY
"'THE
PUMPKI N
EATER"
x and
"WORLD WITHOUT SUN"

4

ORGANIZATION NOTICES
l. . . . . . . . . . . .S

DIAL 5-6290
Shows at
1, 3, 5, & 9 P.M.

Use of This Column for Announce-
ments is available to officially recog-
nized and registered student organiza-
tions only. Forms are available in Room
1011 SAB.
* * *
Anthropology Club, Fall picnic, pot
luck supper, Oct. 3, 11 a.m., Dexter-
Huron Metropolitan Park, Huron River
Dr.
* * *
Gamma Delta, Regular weekly meet-
ing, Sun., Oct. 3, supper at 6 p.m.,
program at 6:45. Judeo-Christian Dia-
log, Dr. Jacobs of Hillel Foundation,
guest speaker. All welcome.
Guild House, After game cider and
donuts, Oct. 2, after the game, Guild
House, 802 Monroe.
* * *
Lutheran Student Chapel, Sunday:

Worship services, 9:30 and 11 a.m.;
7 p.m., "The Holy Spirit," Dr. Henry8
Yoder, campus pastor, Hill St. at
Forest.
* * *
Newman Students Association, Uh-.
dergrads-Taffy pull and skit, 8 p.m.,
Sat., Oct. 2, 331 Thompson.
* * *
South Quadrangle Quadrants, Meet- '
1g, Sun., Oct. 3, 10:30, South Quad
Council Room.
* * *
Unitarian Student Group,, Discussion
on Viet Nam, Oct. 3, 7:30 p.m., Rides
at Union and Markley at 7:15 p.m.
University Lutheran Chapel, Sunday
morning services 9:45 and 11:15 a.m.,
Communion at both. Speaker: Rev. Ar-
thur Spomer. All welcome. 1511 Wash-
tenaw.

4

HII.

Announcement of location
'for Homecoming Concerts
Block Ticket Preferencing
DON'T MISSM

CHOICE SEATS FOR
SATURDAY & SUNDAY MATINEES
9 PTP4 a[NIX
The classic American comedy !
/ "'YOU CAN'T
TAKE IT
by WITH YOU
GEORGE S. KAUFMAN an MOSSHART

Next: "SHIP OF FOOLS"

Shows at 1 :00-3:00-5:00-7:00 & 9:05

Today

Dial 662-6264

0I

THE

* PETER

INow

Directed by Ellis Rabb

Sept. 29, 30, Set Designer:
Art. 1-'7- :_ ame mpTi'*me

Costume Designee:
N!2nrv Onm44a

- - m _ wa - - k -m k2 onL U m dfU

I

I

O

A A. r w. A r a

AN&

Back to Top

© 2017 Regents of the University of Michigan