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September 30, 1965 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 1965-09-30

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PAGE-TWO

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 0,1965

PAGE TWO THE MICHIGAN DAILY ThURSDAY. SEPTEMBER 30. 111C5
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'Madame's Earrings'
A Sensitive Portrait

APA OPENING:
You Can't Take It With You':
Successful Comedy Revival

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DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN
:{--... - .... -*......-. .. .

By PAUL SAWYER

At The Cinema Guild

As a tragedy of love, "The Ear-
rings of Madame de X" is moving
and convincing; as a study of
adultery, it is subtle and sensitive;
as a total film, it is a work of
art. And it proves its director, the
late Max Ophuls, to have been
one of the modern cinema's most
gifted craftsmen.
The plot, set in pre-war France,
is a love triangle between a
wealthy, unimaginative . French
general (Charles Boyer), his beau-
tiful but vain wife (Danielle Dar-
rieux) and a dashing Italian dip-
lomat (Vittorio da Sica). Fate
enters into the situation in the
form of a pair of earrings, given
to Madame de X by her husband,
which she sells in order to over-
come a debt.
Infidelity
In two instances, they become
the means by which the general
learns of his wife's infidelity. The
earrings are in a like manner
given as a gift and then resold by
the recipient three times in the
course of the film, by virtue of
which they become the symbol of
all the elaborate trivia this so-
ciety has been substituting in the
place of meaningful, personal re-
lationships.
Yet the most remarkable -part
of this remarkable film is not its
portrayal. of a decadent society,
but rather the subtle, almost im-
perceptible transformation of Ma-
dame de X from a vain and
fickle fashion plate to, a tragic
heroine.
Lavish Sets.
It takes a while to realize this
transformation, partly because
Ophuls' :lavish sets, in addition to
emphasizing the superficiality of
this society, keeps the characters
for awhile at a distance. Madame
seems always to be partly lost
behind gowns and drapes. Vital
clues to character come from ran-
dom snatches of conversation and
seemingly trivial actions.
But once we have become in-
volved, the gracefully flowing
photography, the constantly, mov-
ing and glittering objects and the
gradual increase of tension sweep
us onward, and the climax is one
of somber beauty and great power.
nUMber '65'. . 10/15-16
I FRE UPEOR

The luxurious decor, which was
one of Ophuls' trademarks, car-
ries us off to a faraway world
which has the mistly elegance and
impermanence of dreams. The
frequent scenes of diplomatic con-'
cultations just previous to the
war remind us that like this civili-
zation, Madame's illicit happiness
is doomed. Yet the pervading mood
of this film is not one of stark
gloom, but of nostalgia and the
ache and longing that accompany
shattered dreams.
ORGAN IZATION
NOTICES
Use of This Column for Announce-
ments is available to officially recog-
nized and registered student organiza-
tions only. Forms are available in Room
1011 SAB.
* * *'
Baptist Student Union, Discussion:
"Salt of the Earth?", Fri., Oct. 1, 7:30
p.m., 1131 Church St.
* . *
Cervantes Club, Meeting to discuss
"Courtship in Latin America," Part I,
Sept. 30, 7:15 p.m., Room 3-D, Michi-
gan Union.
The Christian Science Organization,
Thursday evening- testimony meeting,
Sept. 30, 7:30 p.m., 3545 BAB.
Circle Honorary Society, Meeting,
Thurs.,. Sept. 30, 7 p.m., The Cave at
the League.
Folk Dance Club, Folk dance with in-j
struction Fri., Oct. 1, 8-11 p.m., Bar-
bour Gym.
Guild House, Friday noon luncheon,
John Telfer, University planner: "The
Human Scale of University Planning,"
Oct. 1, 12-1 p.m., Guild House, 802
Monroe.
* * *
Inter-Quadrangle Council ,House Aca-
demic Chairman's meeting, Sept. 30, 9
p.m., 3511 SAB.

Moss Hart and George S. Kauf-'
man wrote "You Can't Take It
With You" about a decade before
the current crop of undergraduates
was born. It has been, since then,
standard fare for high school
plays, civic theatre groups, and
practically any off-Broadway out-
fit in search of a tested comedy.
The Association of Producing
Artists Repertory Company has
brought it back again as they open
their fourth fall festival. From
where I sat last night at Lydia
Mendelssohn Theatre, Ann Arbor
seemed to think the revival a fine
idea.
"You Can't Take It With You"
is a zany story of a family of ec-
centric individualists, a well-mixed
bag of nutty folk whose normal,
all-American daughter falls in love
with the boss' (well-heeled, but
also all-American) son.
Poor Alice!
Poor, frustrated, fretting Alice
(the daughter)! Her mother has
fancied herself a playwright for
eight years, since 'a typewriter
showed up by error at her front
door. Her grandfather hasn't
worked for 35 years. Her father
and his pal manufacture fireworks
in the cellar, and explode them in
the dining room.
Her sister Essie has been prac-
PHONE 483-4680
Entan~e On CARPENTER ROAD
NOW SHOWING
r:::> WILLIAM CASTLE'S

ticing ballet (in vain) for eight
years and gets her kicks by gal-
loping about in toutou and tights.
Essie makes candy in the kitchen
and her husband sells it around
town, when he's not playing his
zylophone. They keep snakes in
the sideboard, and a Russian ex-
patriate is always stopping in for
for a meal.
Well Cast
The actors obviously know what
this brand of comedy is all about
and they're very, very well cast.
They all work hard, in other
words, toward a very bouncy,
comic evening. The question folks
will be asking in the morning,
however, is why the Professional
Theatre Program chose to open
with this play.
What was hilariously funny in
the thirties is still as humorous,
but for different reasons. It's al-
most impossible to see the play
except as a vintage piece of
American comedy.
The play is delightful for this
i 1

very reason-for the same rea-
sons we now delight in Laurel and
Hardy and W. C. Fields. It cap-
italizes in 1965 on the same strains
that have sparked the Lone Rang-
er revival, Peter Sellers' spoofs,
Bogart movie reruns and Andy
Warhol.
Vintage Quality
The Hart-Kaufman script, re-
member, won a Pulitzer Prize in
1937. It's straight thirties. Even
the phonograph plays tunes from
that decade and the music at in-

The Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publication of the Univer-
sity of Michigan, for which The
Michigan Daily assumes no editor-
ial responsibility. Notices should be
sent in TYPEWRITTEN form to
Room 3564 Administration Bldg. be-
fore 2 p.m. of the day preceding
publication, and by 2 p.m. Friday
fortSaturday and Sunday. General
Notices may be published a maxi-
mum of two times on request; Day
Calendar items appear once only.
Student organization notices are not
accepted for publication.
THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 30,
Day Calendar
University Management Seminar -

en awill be held from 8 a.m. to noon and
General Notices I to 5 p.m.Monday. Tuesday, Wednes-
:ay, Thursday and Friday between
Fall Term Fees: At least 50 per cent Sept. 30 and Oct. 6.
is due and payable on or before Sept. Upperclass students who wish to elect
30, 1965. physical education classes may do so
Non-payment of at least 50 per cent on Thursday and Friday mornings
by Sept. 30 will result in the assess- only, Oct. 28 and 29.
ment of a delinquent penalty of $5.
Payments may be made in perzon Regents' sleeting: October 22. Con-
or mailed to the Cashier's Office, 1015 munications for consideration at this
Administration Bldg., before 4:30 p.m.. meeting must be in the President's
Thurs., Sept. 30. hands no later than October 8.
Mail. Early I-
Mail payments postmarked after due Statistics Seminar: Prof. Bruce Hill
date, Sept. 30, are late and subject to will speak on "Testing for Constrained
penalty. Sampling in the Random Model," 3201
Identify mail payments as tuition Angell Hall, Sept. 30, 4 p.m.
amnd show student number and name.
Astronomy Dept. Visitors' Night: Fri.,
French and German Screening Exam- Oct. 1. 8 p.m.. Aud. D, Angell Hall.
inations: The screening examinations in John . Kirk will speak on "Observing
French and German for Doctoral can- the Sun." After the lecture the Stu-
didates will be administered on Sat., dent Observatory on the fifth floor of
Oct. 9 from 9 to 11 a.m. in Aud. B, An- Angell Hall will be open for inspec-
gell Hall. Doctoral candidates must tion and for telescopic observations- of
pass thescreening examination before the Moon and Saturn. Children wel-
taking the written test in French or comed, but must be accompanied by
German, unless they have received B adults.

termission will cause a pre-war Irene Place, associate professor, Grad-
uate School of Business Administra-
generation to remember and re- tion, "Managing the Departmental Of-
member. It's not really nostalgia, fice": 5046 Kresge Hearing Research
but the comedy gets an extra Institute, 1:30 p.m.

boost from its vintage quality. i
Mr. Schnitzer has, in other!
words, scored a solid hit in the
best pop-art manner! The mere
appearance in town this week of
"You Can't Take It With You" is
a well-turned artistic comment.
For it, while we are smiling at his
production, we must congratulate
him!
-John J. Manning, Jr.

Cinema Guild - "The Earrings of
Mme. de X": Architecture Aud., 7 and
9 p.m.
Professional Theatre Program Per-
formance-APA company in "You Can't
Take It With You": Mendelssohn Thea-
tre, 8 p.m.
School of Music Faculty Recital -
John Mohier, clarinetist: Recital Hall,
School of Music, 8:30 p.m.

or better in French 111 or German 111.
Those who fail the examination may
take it again when the test is ad-
ministered in December.
Candidates are asked to bring their
own No. 2 pencils.
Physical Education-Women Students:
Women students taking required phys-
ical education who were medically de-
terred for the first half of this se-
mester should report to Office 15, Bar-
bour Gymnasium, to sign for the sec-
ond half of the semester. Registration

Doctoral Examination for JailtiNusser-
wanji Kerawalla, Mechanical Engineer-
ing; thesis: "An Investigation of the
Acoustic Emission from Commercial
Ferrous Materials Subjected to Cyclic
Tensile Loading," Thur7s., Sept. 30.
2323 E. Engrg. Bldg., at 2 p.m. Chair-
man, J. R. Frederick.
Student Government Council Approval
of the following student-sponsored
events becomes effective 24 hours after
(Continued on Page 6)

U
4

DIAL 8-641f
3rd WEEK

I

I

HOMECOMING '65 PRESENTS "TWO TIMES TWO"...

4

IRIGHTEOUS BROTHERS

andt

PETER NERO

I

0

HOMECOMING

I

I

Go Go Girls:
Opal Bailey.
Linda Bloom
Jo Bowerman
Vicki Davis
Gina Garrett
Barbara Glang
Susie Gross
Rusti Hansher
Jan Heim
Sally Herndon
Kathy Miller
Nancy Mull
Marilyn Pershin
Connie Pope
Jeannine Powders
Michele Stagman
'Brooke. Tiley
Chris Van Kampen
Leslie Wahlin
Lynn Wallace

I

IN 2 DOUBLE CONCERTS .. .7:00 A
SATURDAY, OCTOBER 16 at Hill Auditorium
Housing Units:
Make Your Plans Now-Block Ticket Preferencing Is This Saturday!
NUMBER '65 . . . . NUMBER '65 . . . NUMBER '65 .. . . NUMBER '65 .. . . NUh

ND 9:30 P.M.

A

MBER '65 . . . . OCT. 15-16

Iii

I

Ii

1 111

Watch for them in the
Friday afternoon pa-
rade and at the Dance
that night featuring
the Four Tops !
nUMber '65 . . . 10/15-16

Read

Daily
Classifieds

1 /
SHOWING TONIGHT
7 and 9P.M.
* U
MAX OPHUL'S
THE EARRINGS
OF MME. de X.
FIRST ANN ARBOR SHOWING
I I
I Ik

GRAVFW HA

FRIDAY, OCTOBER 1
TUDENT MXE-12
.LL - 314.i LIBERTY
$100

ill

11111

-. i

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