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September 25, 1965 - Image 2

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1965-09-25

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'PAGE TWO.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 25,.1985 ,

'PAGE TWO THE MICHIGAN DAILY SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 2~. 1965

CHANGES RECOGNIZED:
Felheim Stresses Communications

Honors Science Course Highly Praised,
Researchers Discuss Projects, Approaches

By MICHAEL HEFFER
Lack of effective communica-
tions within the University is
leaving important school issues
unresolved, Prof. Marvin Felheim
of the English department said
yesterday.
Speaking at Guild House, Fel-
heim described the pressures the
University faces, and how in-
ability of administration and fac-
ulty to communicate and coordi-
nate together and among them-
selves perpetuates the condition
despite the necessity of change.
imposed on the University by a
changing society.
Felheim began his discussion
with two assumptions. First, that
"we are undergoing change in
society . . . and certain institutions
are beginning to creak, if they

are not changing." As part of this
social evolution, relations between
individuals and group is such that
communication has deteriorated,
he said. "Now we go to the law,
and can only communicate ef-
fectively by the law."
Communications
As examples of this phenome-
non, Felheim discussed his inabil-
ity to communicate with his neigh-
bors to have them keep their cars
to call in the law.,
He also asked "Why should stu-
dents not use proper mufflers on
cycles? Why must the city have
to make them?" Felheim said
there is a case where a Michigan
State University student is suing
the school for flunking him.
Feiheim's second assumption
was that a university is "involved
in every form of society . . . and

"Those who choose a professional life, will hardly find
a place in the West, equal to the University of Mich-
igan, Ann Arbor, to obtain their literary qualifications.
An entrance fee of Ten Dollars, with Five Dollars yearly,,
pays for a full Literary, Law, Medical, or Civil Engineer-
ing course; the first requiring four, the next, two, and
the last three years."
"Or in the words of the Catalogue: The University, hav-
ing been endowed by the General Government, affords
education, without money and without price. There is
no young man, so poor, that industry, diligence, and
perseverance will not enable him to get an education
here." (Dr. Chase's Recipes; Fiftieth Edition; 1869, Ann
Arbor.
A single text today costs more than tuition did then.
WHY?
-SGC Committee on the University Bookstore

is probably the institution most
sensitive to change in society."
The University must also be sen-
sistive to demands of students,
who are at the University only a
short time, and therefore want
immediate action, and rightly so
said Felheim.
The government also wants im-
mediate action, said Felheim. De-
mands of society, students and
government are the pressures the
University must face.
University
Felheim then discussed how the
University attempts and often
fails to meet these demands in
two areas, academics and stu-
dent welfare.
He talked of problems the Eng-
lish department has faced in try-
ing to reorganize. Problems have
been compounded by the fact that
the chairman, the executive com-
mittee and the rest of the faculty
have different ideas on their re-
spective roles, he said.
Felheim found that communica-
tions suffers at all levels. He said
he has almost as much trouble
seeing some of his colleagues as
he does meeting his students. "I
used to be able to call my students
if I had to, now I have only their
student numbers," he said. This
he found indicative of much Uni-
versity, communication.
Undergraduate Problems
Felheim found much to criticize
in the areas of teaching fellows,
undergraduate education, Univer-
sity Extension Centers and the
residential college. He foresaw a
lower quality of instructor teach-
ing in the residential college. He
felt that many teachers and stu-
the
canterbury
house
will be available
for listening
and like that
on friday and
saturday night
stop by
one dollar per person

MARVIN FELHEIM
dents receiving credit at University
centers are unqualified.
Student economic concerns and
money policies of the University
were important parts of Felheim's
talk. Student wages and living
conditions are two of the most
important unresolved issues the
University faces, he said.
Not all the money the University
gets is used at once, said Felheim.
He said much of it must be col-
lecting interest for some period
of time. He said he had tried but
never succeeded in finding out
what happens to such interest.
Felheim's conclusion was tnat
the undergraduate suffers the
most from lack of communication.
The University administration and
faculty "are all too busy shoving
you students out to your next
role," he said.

By RICHARD CHARIN
College Honors 293 has con-
siderably complicated the lives of
many honors program students. It
is, to quote almost everyone as-
sociated with it, "a most unusual
course." That it is concerned with
the natural sciences is probably
the only certain characteristic it
has.
It was originally conceived as "a
survey of evolution," but over the
years it has undergone an evolu-
tion of its own, and is presently
concerned with "Revolutionary
Ideas in Science." The course is
being taught by four professors,
all of whom attend class meetings.
They are all scientists in astron-
omy, geology, physics or zoology.
Staff
Prof. Otto Graf, chairman of the
honors council, said recently that
what makes College Honors 293
"unique and eminently respect-
able" is that four recognized re-
search scientists are willing to
teach it. "The quality of the scien-
tists guarantees the rigor and
scientific character of the course's
content."
Prof. Paul Cloke of the geology
department, and Prof. Donat
Wentzel of the astronomy depart-
ment are presently teaching the
College Honors 293 course, and
have taught it in the past. Along
with Prof. John Bardack of the
zoology department and Prof. T.
Michael Sanders of the physics
department, they teach over 30
students. Both Cloke and Wentzel
agree that the course program is
designed primarily for nonscience
majors as an important addition to
their liberal arts education, by
demonstrating to the students how
scientists think and work.

Cloke added that the major
goals have remained the same al-
though the professors who teach
the course and the specific sub-
jects discussed have often changed
over the years. They are "to show
the interrelatedness of the
sciences," and to "develop the cur-
iosity of the students in he dif-
ferent aspects of the sciences."
Evolution Class
College Honors 293 has, in the
past, been taught during different
years as a course in energy, evo-
lution and structure and function.
This was done in the hope' of
showing students different meth-
ods of looking at the subject of
science.
Wentzel thinks that the two
main advantages of a course
taught like College Honors 293
are the possibilities of interaction
and flexibility. Comments during
class may come from the other
faculty present as well as from
students. These discussions us-
ually help keep the different as-
pects of the course from separat-
ing into "little chunks." Inter-
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action between the disciplines can
help to create interest in all of
them.
Honors program students are
usually able to learn concepts
rapidly enough that instruction
does not have to bog down in
details and explanations. Wentzel
explained that this gives the in-
structors a great deal of flex-
ibility in their presentations, and
allows him to discuss in class
"what I am excited about."
Extra meetings held in the even-

ing. "form a large part of the
character of the course," Cloke
maintained. They help add
breadth to topics already discuss-
ed and often bring out new topics."
Meeting in smaller groups, and
the evening hours seem to relax
the tension between faculty and
students. Wentzel hopes that these
meetingstwouldtgive everyone the
"chance to see that professors are
human and have opinions about
art and politics" as well as about
science.

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