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September 23, 1965 - Image 2

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1965-09-23

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PAGE TWO

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

THUIRSDAY, 'SEPTE~MBER . 21969

tAGE TWO T E ICHIAN..AI.

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a

COM EDY LEADS OFF:
Trilogy Sparks APA Fall Festival

By JOYCE WINSLOW
Since 1962 when it was estab-
lished, the University's Profes-
sional Theatre Program has been
making national theatre history
with the presentation of an an-
nual Fall Festival by its resident
repertory company, the Associa-
tion of Producing Artists.
The ensemble will return to
campus after a brilliant season at
the Phoenix Theatre, Off-Broad-
way, New York, where it pre-
sented the three plays originally
created and played at last year's
Fall Festival. "Man and Super-
man,"' "War and- Peace," and
"Judith" received rave notices by
theatre critics.
Next Wednesday evening the,
PTP will launch the '65 Fall Fes-
tiVad 'with the classic comedy of
the thirties, "You Can't Take It
With You," one of the brightest
and best of the Kaufman and Hart
farces. The gay philosophy of a
carefree family in this play was
an antidote to the Depression dur-
ing which the play was created,'
and is equally applicable to the
current "Age of Anxiety," accord-
ing. to critics.
Rosemary Harris, who starred
in last fall's productions and who
won erriticial acclaim for her per-
formance in "Judith" will por-
tray the ingenue sin "You Can't
Take It With You." Clayton Cor-
zette will play the male lead. The
sets are 'designed in period by
James Tilton and Nancy Potts
has created the costumes.
The second Festival play on the
bill 'will be the Eva LeGalliene
translation of Ibsen's "The Wild
Duck," one of the most moving
and dramatic of the great Nor-
wegian playwright's works. Steph-
en Porter is directing.
Climaxing the Festival will be
world premiere of "Herakles" by
Pulitzer prize - winner Archibald
MacLeish. MacLeish's "J.B." won
a Pulitzer award when Elia Ka-
zan's production played a success-

Cinema Art
Films Need
'More Work
By MICHAEL JULIAR
At The Cinema Guild
Last night, the Cinema Guild
put on two shows of experimental
films from the United States
which will be shown in a special
category at the VIII Bienal de
Sao Paulo in Brazil. And a spe-
cial category they need.
All of the films are eye-catch-
ing for their first two minutes,
but most of them become tedious
and entirely incomprehensible
long before they end. But this is
not meant to condemn them for-
ever, but to say that they all
could use much editing and tight-
ening up. Some of them, seen be-
fore on the campus, show changes
often for the better.
Richard Myers' "Coronation"
shows additional work since it
won first place at the Ann Arbor
Film Festival in the spring. And
it looks like Myers is still re-
fining it. It is a little easier to un-
derstand, not ;quite as bewilder-
ing and the myriad of symbols
stands a better chance of being
caught by the viewer. But it is
still too vague a' creation.
The two films by Ann Arbor-
ites, "Miss Pepsi" by Michael Eis-
ler and "L'Histoire du Soldat" by
George Manupelli are total fail-
ures.
Still, all of the films show a
playful sense of humor that is
always a relief from trying to un-
derstand most of the obscure im-
ages that the artists flash before
our eyes.
The program got two full houses
which shows that the students are
at least curious, if not sympathet-
ic. But most of them left the
auditorium as I did, with eye-
lids hanging. Experiment may get
the best of us yet.

By MICHAEL JULIAR
At The Cinema Guild
The reputation that Orson
Welles' "Citizen Kane" has in
American movie history is as over-
whelming as the fictional Kane is.
And it is as controversial.
A year does not go by that some
student of the cinema writing in
a college paper, an avant-garde
journal, a staid metropolitan
newspaper or talking before some
Hollywood friends condemns Wel-
les' naive and simple-minded
basis for Kane's titanic, accumu-
lative and domineering character;
or condemns Welles' old hat tricks
of the motion picture trade that
Hollywood had used years before
and were hailed as revolutionary
in 1940; or condemns Welles' af-
fectations, such as putting ceil-
ings on all the indoorsets. This
is to be expected of a movie that
permanently affects everyone who
sees it. Coming out of the dark
theatre after two hours of story-
telling, suspense and pseudo-
Freudian melodrama (always pop-
ular with 20th century Ameri-
cans), it takes almost another two
hours to cast off the spell of
Welles' imagination. Whether we
completelycomprehend wha t
Welles' has done or how he has
done it, we are completely taken
in. That would seem to be enough
right there to grant "Citizen
Kane" its due fame-not because
of its popularity or lack of it, but
because it so impresses those who
do see it.

Yet, we can ask, is it effect for
effect's sake? Is it just playing
with our sensibilities, like Hitch-
cock always does, and without
significance, also like Hitchcock.
Or is it a monumentally striking
point of view of an American of
giantic proportions-almost turn-
ed into a legend before our eyes?
I think that Welles' simply be-
came so fascinated with his new
"toy," as he readily admits he
was when he went to Hollywood
that first time in 1940, that he
lost grasp of his protagonist.
Kane simply got out of hand. Here
was a multimillionarie, who died
empty-handed. He collected sta-
tues and pottery, diamonds and
newspapers, a castle and a mis-
tress. But he died without any-
thing of human value, except that
intriguing but not very significant
word on his lips, "Rosebud."
So, Welles let himself get out
of hand. He pulled together a
panorama of life from the 1890's
to the 1930's, ridden and beaten

under the whip of Kane. He tossed
in a newsreel, chiarscuro light-
ing, actors delivering their lines
over each other, a deep focus
technique of drawing different
points of attention into the frame
at the same time, an eye for the
odd and stimulating angle and a
flare for exciting continuity from
one'scene or time to another. And
what does this all add up to? A
constantly interesting, but unfor-
tunately vacuous picture. We un-
derstand little more about Kane
at the end when we do find out
what "Rosebud" is, than we do
near the beginning when we first
see him as a small boy against a
background of pure white snow,
having the time of his life sled-
ding down a hill in front of his
mother's Colorado boarding house.
Kane's "Rosebud" is just an-
other piece in the puzzle as one
person says at the end, and it
is lost on us as are all the rest
of the scrambled up pieces Welles
presents us with.

ALWAYS CONTRO VERSIAL:
'Kane': Excits But Unfulfilling

LENOY IMPORTS
DISTINCTIVE GIFTS

GATHERING AltOUND THE dinner table in a scene from the APA's "You Can't Take ItWith You"
are (from left) Paulette Water, Joseph Bird, Nat Simmons, Gordon Gould, and Diane' Linders.

ful Broadway run several seasons
ago. In "Herakles" MacLeish deals
with the problem of man in rela-
tion to his complex world,' and
uses an ancient legend to make a
provocative modern point.
Title role in "Herakles" will be
portrayed by Sydney Walker, and
Rosemary Harris will play the fe-
male lead. Alan Schneider, who
staged the Broadway hits "Who's
Afraid of Virginia Woolf?" and
"Tiny Alice is directing.
Because the' new MacLeish
play has a running time of only
one and one-half hours, instead
of the usual two, the PTP will
present a curtain-raiser preceding
"Herakles." "Krapp's Last Tape,"

by Samuel Beckett, will be offered
in double bill. The play was de-
scribed by critics as "fascinating
theatre of the absurd" when it
was presented Off-Broadway. The
avant-garde short play was ;orig-
inally presented in a highly suc-
cessful New York run with Donald
Davis, who played a leading role
in "An Evening's Frost," in Ann
Arbor last February. This year
Donald Moffatt will portray the
solo role which is considered a
tour de force for a character play-
er. The play will be directed by
Alan Schneider who has directed
the' American premieres of all the
plays by Samuel Beckett.
Beckett is an internationally
celebrated playwright 'of "theatre
of the absurd" works, whose

"Waiting for Godot" is a classic
of contemporary avant garde
drama.
The 1965 Fall Festival runs
from Sept. 29 through Nov. 14.
The PTP program is unique in
that it was one of the first or-
ganizations to bring a repertory
group to a college campus. APA,
the repertory group, has won na-
tional acclaim for its perfqrmances
here and in New York.
This may be the last year the
Ann Arbor community has the op-
portunity to see the APA perfor-
mances here. The APA's contract
with the University expires this
year and although they have been
invited to renew their contract,
the APA has as yet made no state-
ment.

Mexican Handicraft
Sweaters
Pottery
MAYNARD HOUSE

Woolen Goods
Sara pes
Gifts
524 E. WILLIAM

4

Outside the Classroom this Week

By VICKI LASSAR
and DALE GOLD

HIGHLIGHT
Mark Your Calendar
"The Pawnbroker," presented
py Ely Landau and Herbert R.
Steinmann. Starting at the Cam-
pus Theatre (Sept. 30).
Already acclaimed one of the
most controversial motion pic-
tures of the year, "The Pawn-
proker" arrives next Thursday for
a long-awaited engagement. It is
the starkly realistic story of a
middle-aged Jewish pawnbroker
(Rod Steiger) who is plagued both
by the cruel memories of his fam-
fly and friends annihilated before
his eyes in a World War II con-
centration camp and by his equal-
ly despicable imprisonment within
the walls of New York's Harlem
where he works. The Juxtaposition
of these topics and their treat-
ment prove to be the basis of con-
troversy.
Steiger's past. and present are
joined by a brilliant method of
stream of consciousness photog-
raphy whereby past memories are
brought forth by instantaneous
flashes which appear to the au-
dience as they would appear in
Steiger's mind.
Steiger is superb as the pawn-
broker in the role which will un-
doubtedly warrant his nomination
for Best Actor of the Year. The
unique photography is noteworthy
here in addition to the fine per-
formances of Brock Peters, Jaime
Sanchez, and Geraldine Fitz-
gerald.
* * *
Art
Forsythe Gallery, 201. Nickels
Arcade-Sculpture and painting
abstracts in metal and wood by
Narenda M. Patel. (Weekdays, 10-
4; Saturday 10-1: through Oct.
14; free.)
Museum of Art, State St. -
Chinese and Japanese painting
and sculpture . . . Contemporary,
paintings and sculpture from the'
museum collection . . . Italian,
Dutch, and English prints and
drawings . .,. Goya prints. (Mon-
day-Saturday, 9-5; Sunday, 2-5.)
Architecture and Design Build-
ing-Reed City, an experimental
architecture exhibit (through Sept,
29).%
* * *
Cinema
Cinema Guild, Architecture and
Ph. 483-4680
Etx& am fn-CARPENTER ROAD
Bax'Office Open from 6:30 to 10
NOW SHOWING
M-CMpiusents
CARLO PONTI A i

Design Auditorium - "Citizen
Kane," Orson Welles and Joseph
Cotton star in this film based on
the life of Hearst. (7 and 9 p.m.,,
Sept. 23, 24.)
'School for Scoundrels," a one-
upmanship delight starring Terry
Thomas, Ian Carmichael, and
Alistair Sim. (7 and 9 p.m., Sept.
25, 26.)
Campus Theater, South Univer-
sity-"The Collector," Samantha
Eggar and Terence Stamp, Cannes
Film Festival award winners. (7
and 9 p.m., through Sept. 25.)
Michigan Theater, East Liberty
- "Darling," starring Lawrence
Harvey and Judy Christine.. (1, 3,
5, 7, and 9 p.m., Sept. 23 to 30.)
State Theater, State St. -
"Help," the 'Beatles. (2:45, 4:55,
7:05, and 9:1 0 p.m., Sept. 23, 24.)
Billie," starring Patty Duke. (7
and 9 p.m., Sept. 25-29.)
Radio
WUOM FM 91.7 mc. Ann Arbor.
Music of the Masters-Rach-
maninov: Piano Concerto' no. 2 in
C minor--Raymond Lewenthal,
pianist . . . Mahler: Symphony
no. 7 in B minor-Hermann

Schershen and Maurice Abravanel
conducting the Vienna State
Opera Orchestra. (8:05 p.m., Sept.
23.)
Football-U. of M. vs. California
at Ann Arbor. (1:15 p.m., Sept.
25.)
* * *
Television:
Meet the Press-News panel in-
terviews Arthur J., Goldberg, U.S.
ambassador to U.N., on U.N. posi-
tion in India-Pakistan dispute.
(Channel 4, 4 p.m., Sept. 26.)
Chicago Symphony-Jean Mar-
tinon conducts the Chicago Sym-
phony Orchestra in Brahms Sym-
phony no. 2, and Variations for
orchestra on a theme of Paganini.
(Channel 56, 7:30 p.m., Sept. 26.)
* * *
Theatre
Professional Theatre Program
presents the APA PHOENIX CO.
-"YouCan't Take It With You,"
the funniest American comedy by
George S. Kaufman and Moss
Hart. Directed by Ellis Rabb.
(Evenings Wednesday through
'Saturday 8 p.m.; Matinees Satur-
day, Sunday 2:30 p.m., Sept. 29-
Oct. 3, reserved seats.)

Civic Theatre, Trueblood Audi-
torium, Frieze Building-"Never
Too Late," the Broadway hit star-
ring Mr. and Mrs. Robert Rein-
hart, and Mr. and Mrs. Michael
Simpson. (8 p.m., Sept. 23-25, re-
served seats.)
OUT OF TOWN
Art
Detroit Institute of. Arts, 5200
Woodward Ave., Detroit-Art Is-
rael, 26 painters and sculptors or-
ganized by the Museum of Modern
Art, featuring two influential Is-
raeli masters,. Mordecai Ardon
and Josef Zaritsky. (Tues.-Fri.,
9-9; Sat. and Sun., 9-6, through
Oct. 3.)

Cinema
Detroit Institute of Arts, 5200
Woodward Ave., Detroit-First of
the series entitled "Films On Art."
"The City in Art," some of the
world's greatest cities as seen
through the eyes of their artists
--past and present-Venice, Mos-
cow, Delhi, and New York. (8 p.m.,
Sept. 28, free.)
Theatre
Fisher Theatre, 2nd and West
Grand Blvd., Detroit-"Skyscrap-
er," based on Emma Rice's
"Dream Girl," with Julie Harris
and Victor Spinetti. (Nightly at
8:30 p.m., matinees Wed. and Sat.,
through Oct. 1; reserved seats.)

4

r

Th

A

Petition Now For
CINEMA GUILD BOARD
September 20-26
Sign up on Cinema Guild
Office Door-2547 S.A.B.

Dial 662-6264

ENDS FRIDAY
Shows at 1:00-
2:45-4:55-7:00 & 9:10

I

~:~'S9TOP WORRYING Iw j
ISONTHE WAY!
The Colorful Adventures of
THE BEAThES-
are more Colorful than ever...in COL.R!
EASTMANCOLOR UNITED ARTISTS RELEASE
STARTS SATURDAY
PRESENT$ y u e
# TECICOLOR
U RETEEOTS
'UNTED ARTISTS

DIAL 5-6290
Shows at 1, 3, 5, 7 and 9:10

When she was good ... she was very, very good .. .
when she was bad she was DARLING!
TEVERYTHING YOU
HOPE FOR BUT
RARELY FIND
IN A FILM!"
-New York.Herald Tribune
"DEVASTATING!
BLISTERING!. * " ;''''
SLASHING!"
-New York Times

1~

IIIMf PrfsinlTheatre Program

"IRRESISTIBLE!"
- Time Magazine

WYL E'S the
collectore
TECHNICOLOR*
"TEREACE STAMP
is splendid' Scar 'i
a gnd memorable!"
--Ladies' Home Journal-

I

YOU CAN'T
TAKE IT
WITH YOU
by
GEORGE S. KAUFMAN
and MOSS HART
The classic
American comedy!
Directed by
Ellis Rabb
Set Designer: James Tilton
Costume Designer: Nancy Potts

THE
WILD DUCK
by
HENRIK IBSEN
A new version
of the poignant drama
Directed by
Stephen Porter
Set Designer: James Tilton
costume Designer: Nancy Potts

HERAKIES
by ARCHIBALD MAC LEISH
The Pulitzer Prize
playwright's provocative
new play
Directed by
Alan Schneider
Set Designer: James Tilton
costume Designer: Nancy PottS
KRAPP'SLAST TA L
by SAML M EC
'"Fasdnatnteae

ii";.

Lam ., .. .:: .:- ._,... i

U U ® U

j

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