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September 19, 1965 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 1965-09-19

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PAGE TWO

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

CiTl TFf tT 'Ct+nm artsr. s n .....

PAGETWOTil MIHIEN ftlI1

NUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 19. 1965

5

Parker Pioneers Strings in Jazz

TIME-LAG, BUREAUCRACY:
Classification System Stumbles Again

By NEAL BRUSS
Over 20 years ago, the legendary
saxophonist and progressive jazz
pioneer Charles Parker "sat in
with a group of violinists. Out of
his experiment came .a record,
"Parker with Strings, the Bird's
last major production and the
worst received. It was the bebop;
age, and jazzmen and critics
blasted Parker for commercializ-
Daily To Fete
75th Birthday
Nearly 250 staff members of
The Daily will return to the Uni-
versity Sept. 24 and 25. The occa-
sion is the 75th anniversary of the
newspaper's birth in 1890.
Four former Daily editors will
give reminiscences of their years
on the paper at a banquet at the
Michigan League Friday evening.
They are:
-George Davis, managing edi-
tor of The Daily in 1925-26 and
now vice president of Campbell-
Ewald Co. in Detroit, who will
speak for the alumni of the 1920s.
-Tuure Tenander, editorial di-
rector of The Daily in 1937-38
and now vice president of Crocker
,Hamilton Papers, Inc., Fitchburg,
Mass., will represent the staffers
of the 1930s. He also will be toast-
master.
--Leonard Greenbaum, Daily
editorial director in 1951-52 and
currently assistant director and
editor of the Phoenix publications
for the Phoenix Pr'oject and assist-
ant professor of engineering Eng-
lish, will speak for the post-war
Daily staffers.
-Thomas Hayden, Daily editor
in 1960-61 and now director of the
Newark Community Action Pro-
gram, will represent the alumni
of the 1960s.

ing, and turning traitor against
the very music he had developed.
Harsh attitudes against strings
among jazz and other less tradi-
tional musicians have persisted.
Suddenly, however, chamber mu-
sic is being embraced by some un-
likely types. It is the beginning of
possibly the most dynamic trend
in American music since Bird
brought out bop.
Jazz groups have almost totally
used the bass viol as a rhythm
instrument. It would be plucked
and not bowed, and a bassist
might take a driving rhythmic
solo in a jazz performance. How-
ever, recently two skilled jazzmen
have been recorded playing bowed
bass, and have been warmly re-
ceived.
Eldee Young plays bass in the
lively Ramsey Lewis Trio, and has
an extensive background in class-
ical repertoire. On an album call-
ed "Pot Luck," the Trio undertook
"E lucevan le stelle,", "the stars
were shining," from Puccinni's
"Tosca." Young played bowed
cello, and the group proved that
in such lyrical music, there is
room for jazz 'soul.'
The Lewis Trio's current album,
"The In Crowd" features Young
again playing bowed bass in an
almost aria treatment of "Maria"
from "West Side Story." While
the Trio has a colorful blues style,
they also have exceptional skill,
use masterful techniques, and
produce some exciting interpreta-
tions of classics.
Ray Brown has played jazz bass
for many years, many of them
with the masterful Oscar Peterson
Trio, a more traditional progres-
sive group. Brown has employed
bowed style on many 'productions,
including the Peterson Trio's own
"Jazz Impressions of West Side
Story."
Folk singer Joan Baez probably
astonished many folk enthusiasts
with her fifth album. Baez sang

the Aria from Hector Villa-Lobos'
"Bacchianas Brasilieras No. 5"
With an accompaniment of eight
cellos.
Perhaps the most surrealistic
production of the current trend
features a string ensemble with
Beatle Paul MacCartney on a song
"Yesterday"' currently played on
commercial radio and occasionally
slipped in on FM. Surprisingly
enough, the treatment is tasteful,
the strings are well-employed, and
the entire concept is creative.
Classical musicians welcome the
return to strings. Robert Courte,
violinist with the University's
Stanley Quartet said he has rec-
ognized a trend of increased in-
terest in chamber music and
string style. He utilizes jazz to
teach rhythm and elements of
American style to his students,
and was pleased to see growing
creativity in the use of strings.
Courte felt the trend is on a
large scale, and said that pure
chamber music is receiving an up-
surge of interest throughout the
country, especially on college
campuses. The Stanley Quartet
summer concert series was en-
thusiastically received, and. the
group's guest concerts draw in-
creasingly larger audiences.
The Stanley Quartet is one of
over 100 quartets in residence at
American colleges. Courte said
that the willingness of colleges to
support such small groups is sym-
bolic of current intense interest in
classical form. Courte, who spoke
on the quartet in residence con-
cert several years ago in Paris at
sessions of the International Mu-
sic Council organized by UNESCO,
said the phenomenon is truly
American.
Courte analyzed the return to
lyrical string style a~s a reaction
against the cerebral avante-garde
trends in jazz and the crude
ethnic presentations of primitive
folk music of the last several

years. He said, it repudiates the
amorphic rumbling of free jazz
and the sensual beat of the dis-
cotheque.
What is most significant in this
trend is the change of attitude
and the increase in tolerance
among musicians of differing
schools. Classical musicians wel-
come experimentation; jazz musi-
cians feel from fear of recrimina-
tion if they consider classical
technique.
Snobbery is being abandoned
for creativity, and this is definite-
ly a good thing for a developing
American musical idiom. "Parker
with Strings" would be accepted
today by the very musicians who
assailed it over 20 years ago.

(Continued from Page 1)
courses they thought were open.
Unfortunately the courses were
closed. But due to the time-lag,
the word on closings had not come
back, hence the students sched-
ules were unworkable. Some of
the schedule's were solved, but
most students involved had to
fight for what was left on the
floor of Waterman gym.
"I'm sure the registration office
isn't plotting to be as inefficient
as possible," says Manning. But it
still remains true that the opera-
tion as a whole does not do what
it is cracked up to do."

The reasons why the registra-
tion system here is inadequate
are as varied and complicated as
they are covered up.
Blame
To be surer the registrar's office
is partially at fault. The office
has never been known as a par-
ticularly creative one. While MIT,
Purdue, Indiana and many other
major universities are registering
their students through advanced
computer systems, Michigan is
still operating a registration sys-
tem that would disgrace Highland
Park Junior College.
However, it is only fair to point
out that the registrar's office is

hamstrung by inconsistent aca-
demic policies and administrative
red tape. For example Registrar
Edward Groesbeck favors a system
whereby counselors would not have
to sign student's election cards.
While the Business Administra-
tion School already operates un-
.der this system the Literary Col-
lege and most other schools do
not.
Opinion on the idea varys widely
-within the literary college. Some
feel the idea is good, some think
it is bad, and others believe the
system should only be used for
juniors and seniors.
It appears that all phases of

the registration procedure will un-
dergo the thorough examination
they need in the near future.
Administration
The Office of Academic Affairs
has brought in a capable admin-
istrator, Ernest Zimmerman, to
establish a system that will even-
tually see Waterman gym go back
to being a year around badminton
court.
Zimmerman is planning a sys-
tem that will combine an optical
scanning machine with computers
to process pre-registration forms.
The system is planned for imple-
mentation in the fall of 1967 and
should eliminate the time-lag that
resulted in this fall's disaster for
246 students.
More than anything else the
implementation of the new sys-
tem will necessitate a thorough
evaluation of registration pro-
cedures.
In deciding how the new system
will operate university factions
will need to finally resolve their
differences over registration pro-
cedures.
Ultimately the system should be
a better one for all concerned.
"We want to run the machines,
we don't want them to run us,"
says Registrar Groesbeck.

4

The Week To Come* a Campus Calendar

4
4
*

SUNDAY, SEPT. 19
9:30 a.m. - The Ypsilanti
Church of Christ will hold a wel-
come for the college students in
the area. Following a Bible study
at 9:30 a.m. there will be worship
service at 10:30 a.m. and a pot-
luck dinner in honor of the college
students. A bus from the church
will leave the front of the Mich-
igan Union at 8:50 a.m.
2 p.m. - Assembly Association
and IQC are sponsoring Mrs.
Alice Haddix speaking on "Your
Residence Halls: Classrooms for
Living" in the Michigan Room of
the Michigan League.
2 p.m. -Saul Alinsky, keynote
speaker of the Challenge Lecture
Series of Challenge and the Uni-
versity Activities Center, will dis-
cuss the topic "Can a Mass So-
ciety Be a Great Society" in the
League Ballroom.
4:15 p.m. - Kim Kasling, U-M
teaching fellow in organ will give
the opening recital of the Fifth
Annual Conference on Organ

_ _ I

d

Music at the University, Sept.
19-21.
7:30 p.m. - The UM Student
Employees Union will have an or-
ganizational meeting in Room 3-R
of the Michigan Union.
8 p.m.-The Young Democrats
will sponsor a speech by Con-
gressman Wes Vivian (D-Ann
Arbor) on "Accomplishmens of
the Great Society-and What's
To Come" in the Multipurpose
Room of the UGLI.
'MONDAY, SEPT. 20
8:30 a.m.-Registration for the
Fifth Annual Conference on Or-
gan Music will begin at Hill Aud.
TUESDAY, SEPT. 21
8:30 a.m. - There will be a
Training and Development, Per-
sonnel Office University Manage-
ment Seminar, L. Clayton Hill,
professor emeritus of the Gradu-
ate School of Business Adminis-
tration, will speak on the "Basics
of Supervision" in Room 5046 of
the Kresge Hearing Research In-
stitute.
1 p.m.-Training and Develop-
ment, Personnel Office University
Management. Daniel R. Miller,
professor of psychology, will speak
on "On-the-Job Interviewing and
Counseling," at the Michigan
Union.
3 and 4 p.m.-There will be a
registration meeting of the Bu-

I I

reau of Appointments for seniors
and graduates on placement after
graduation in Aud. A, Angell Hall.
7:30 p.m.-Arts in the Americas
Lecture-"The Colony, a Child of
Europe," at Rackham Amphi-
theater.
8 p.m.-Department of Psychi-
atry University Lecture, the speak-
er will be George E. Ruff, M.D.
of the University of Pennsylvania
School of Medicine and psychia-
trist, Project Mercury who will
speak on the "Psychiatric Aspects
of Space Flight," at the auditor-
ium of the Children's Psychiatric
Hospital.
WEDNESDAY, SEPT. 22
Noon-The Office of Religious
Affairs will present a Luncheon
Book Discussion, the speaker will
be George A. White who will speak
on "A New China Policy," an
American Friends Service Com-
mittee publication, in Conference
Room 2 in the Michigan Union.
THURSDAY, SEPT. 23
7 and 9 p.m. - The Cinema
Guild will present "Citizen Kane"
in the Architecture Aud.
FRIDAY, SEPT. 24
9 a.m.-Registration meeting of
the University Press Club of
Michigan at the Michigan Union.
12:30 p.m. - Registration for
The Michigan Daily anniversary
celebration in the Student Pub-
lications Bldg.
7 and 9 p.m. - The Cinema

i

Guild will present "Citizen Kane"
in the Architecture Aud.
SATURDAY, SEPT. 25
9:30 a.m.-Michigan Daily an-
niversary celebration at the Mich-
igan Union.
7 and 9 p.m. - The Cinema
Guild will present "School for
Scoundrels" in the Architecture
Aud.

p I

Aud. says Registrar Groesbeck.

FrIf

__
_. w. _ ... .. _. ._ _ _ _

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NEVER TOO LATE

COMING
SEPTEMBER 23-25

TRUEBLOOD
AUDITORIUM

Box office open 10:00-5600, Mon.-Sat.
or call: 764-5487
SEASON TICKETS AVAILABLE

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Continuous
Today
from 1 p.m.

A
-NAN tmilulill@

DIAL

The Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publication of the Univer-
sity of Michigan, for which The
Michigan Daily assumes no editor-
ial responsibility. Notices should be
sent in TYPEWRITTEN form to
Room 3564 Administration Bldg. be-
-ore 2 p.m. of the day preceding
publication, and by 2 p.m. Friday
for Saturday and Sunday. General
Notices may be published a maxi-
mum of two times on request; Day
Calendar items appear once only.
Student organization notices are not
accepted for publication.
SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 19
Day Calendar
Conference on Organ. Music Rectal-
Kim Kasling: Hill Aud., 4:15 p.m.
Cinema Guild-"Cyrano de Bergerac":
Architecture Aud , 7 and 9 p.m.
Events Monday
Conference on Organ Music-Registra-
tion, Dill Aud., 8:30 am.
Advanced Firemanship Training Pro-
gram--Civil Defense and Disaster Train-
ing Center, 8:30 am..
School of Music Organ Conference
Recital-Marilyn Mason, organist, Uni-
versity Chamber Choir, Thomas Hil-
bish, conductor: Hill Aud., 8:30 p.m.
General Notices
Flu Shots: The first "flu shot" clinic
for this fall will be held at the Health
Service Tues., Sept. 21 from 8-11:30
a.m. and 1-4:30 pm. The charge is $1
for students and $1.50 for faculty, staff
and spouses.
Engineering Placement Meetings "En-
gineering Opportunities." Discussion
of opportunities for current engineer-
ing graduates, demands, salaries, etc.
Primarily for seniors and graduate stu-
dents, but open to all interested. Prof.
J. G. Young, Sept. 20, 4 p.m., 311 W.
Engrg. Bldg.
Public Health Assembly: Sept. 20,
Aud. of School of Public Health, ,.
p.m. Donald F. Huelke, PhD, will
speak on "Investigation of Injuries
and Deaths from Automobile, Acci-
dents."

Law School Admission Test: Appli-
cation blanks for the Law School Ad-
mission Test are available in 1222 Rasw-
ham Bldg. The next administration off
the test will be on Sat., Nov. 13, and
applications must be received in Prince-
ton, N.J., by Oct. 30.
Make-Up Final Examinations for Ger-
ORGANIZATION
NOTICES
Use of This Column for Announce-
ments is available to officially recog-
nized and registered student organiza-
tions only. Organizations who are plan-
ning to be active for the fall term
must be registered in the Office of
Student Organizations by Sept. 17, 1965.
Forms are available in Room 1011 SAB.
* * *
Bahal Student Group, Lecture: "Blue-
prints for Peace" by Ervin Thomas,
Sun., Sept. 19, 3 p.m., YM-YWCA.
* *
Gamma Delta, Regular meeting Sun.,
Sept. "19, 6 p.m., Prof. Korthals, for-
merly of the Air Force Academy, will
speak on "Science and Christianity,"
University Lutheran Chapel, 1511 Wash-
tenaw.
* * *
Lutheran Student Center and Chap-
el, Worship services: Sunday 9:30 and
11 a.m.; 7 p.m., Speaker, Dr. Richard
Cutler, vice-president of student af-
fairs. Topic: "The University's Concern
for its Students," Hill St. and Forest
Ave.
* 4
University Lutheran Chapel, Regular
Sunday service, Sun., Sept. 19, 9:45 and
11:15 aam., 1511 Washtenaw.
* * *
University of Michigan Student Em-
ployes Union (UMSEU), General mem-
bership meeting, Sept. 19, 7:30 p.m.,
Michigan Union, Room 3K. Discussion
o. KYU Day, housing, bookstore, fu-
ture activities and goals. Nominations
for election of executive committee.
All members and interested people in-
vited.
* * *
Unitarian Student Group, Discussionj
of Robinson's book "Honest to God,"1
Sept. 19, 7:30 p.m., Unitarian Chapel,
Rides,17:15 p.m., Union and Markley.

man 101, 102, 111, 231, 232, and 236, will
be given on Wed., Sept. 22, from 7 to 9
p.m., Room 3527 Frieze Bldg. Students
who wish to write the make-up exam
,are to obtain written permission from
their former instructor, and register for
the exam in the German Department
Office no later than Tues., Sept. 21.
Placement
ANNOUNCEMENT:
Peace Corps, Wash., D.C.-Government
of Iran requests Master's degree vol-
unteers to serve as ass't. professors
at Pahlevi Univ., Shiraz, Iran. De-
grees needed include physiol., biol., bio-
chem., hist., econ., soc., anthro., math,
chem. & physics. Training begins Nov.
1965 at an American univ. Single men
& women & married couples without
dependents are eligible. Peace Corps
questionnaire req.-available at Bureau
of Appointments, 3200 SAB.

Investigator. Male, any degree, no ex-
per. req., draft exempt. Counterintelli-
gence work including investigation of
crimes within Navy & Marine Corps.
Kordite Corp., Macedon, N.Y. - 1.
Process Dev. Engr. BSME or ChE with
mech. bkgd. 3 yrs. exper. . in process
equip. & mech. des. 2. Prod. Dev. Engr.
BS ChE or ME. Some bus. or mktg.
courses helpful. 2 yrs. exper, in plas-
tics package field.
State Legis. Research Council, Pierre,
S.D.-2 Research Staff Ass'ts. One with
degree in finance or acctg., legal trng.
helpful. Another with bkgd. in polit.
sci, or rel. MA, LLB or equiv. degree
desirable. Some res. exper. pref.
For further information, please call
764-7460, General Div., Bureau of Ap-
pointments, 3200 SAB.

HELD WILLIAM WYLERS
OVER! the collector
"A4 SHOCKER sure to quicken the pulse!TME
"A SHOCKER to rivet you to your sea t!' SEVOW
"* * * * ! An electrifying exper oce.P
-N.Y. DAMPY NEWS

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SOCIAL ACTION
Work with handicapped and
underprivileged children.
MASS MEET I NG to discuss projects.

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2 CARTOONS AT DUSK
BOX OFFICE OPENS 6:30

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Film will be shown.

Sunday, Sept.19... 6:30 p.m.
331 Thompson St.

If unable toattend call:
Judy Dempewolff, 663-2465

WOULD YOU LIKE TO READ
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You can read 150-200 pages an hour using the ACCELERATED READING method.
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11

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present
Keynote speaker of the Challenge Lecture Series
CAN A MASS SOCIETY BE A GREAT SOCIETY?

+i

Even Michigan State

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e. s._* _ r . . . ._ ..-- - - -- - . - t C -r IA I ki" Irr . L k

I r A I It A I IA ErV\/ rr-rI_ - /"_ _Ift r 1 - Pt_ __.- \At__ It 1.I__- --I- I

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