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September 16, 1965 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1965-09-16

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

PAGE SIX

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

THURSDAY. SFPTF.M'RElt lR_ Ituln

PAGE SIX TIlE MIChIGAN DAILY

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TWENTY-ONE MONTHS LATER:
Cyprus Awaits an Elusive Peace

NICOSIA, Cyprus OP)-The for-
tified frontier separating hostile
Turks and Greeks is 21 months
old-and there is an air of perm-
anency to the fortifications.
Hip-high weeds clog the narrow
streets in what has become a no-
man's land. Rusting trucks and
autos block entranceways into the
Turkish quarter. Gun emplace-
ments, once haphazard affairs, are
.newly cemented, carpentered and
sandbagged.
Greek and Turkish Cypriot

fighters, in the beginning noth-
ing more than bands of guerrillas,
have been neatly uniformed and
hammered into a semblance of
discipline, while in the alleyways
Turkish Cypriot refugee children
play unconcerned.
Life is almost normal along
Paphos Street on the Green Line,
named for the color of a line
drawn on a map months ago to
mark the frontier between the two
sectors.
Greek Cypriot and Armenian

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merchants have rolled up the
shutters of their fruit and vege-
table markets, yardage goods and
kitchenware stores along the once-
deserted street. The echo of bomb
and bullet has been replaced by
the hammering of the smiths.
Buildings and parks have been
spruced up and roads cleared, and
traffic lights are working again.
But there still is a feeling of
strain in the Turkish zone, where
many residents have remained
since the trouble began. The Tur-
kish Cypriots are a minority.
An extensive building program
is underway on the Greek Cypriot
side of Nicosia. New apartment
and office buildings are shoot-
ing up, along with a Hilton hotel.
However, ┬░there is little con-
struction in the Turkish quarter
because building materials are on
a list of strategic items forbidden
the Turks by the Greek Cypriots.
The island is not back to the
good old days-but the fact that
it has progressed at all is impres-
sive.
"We are as low as we could go,"
says one Turkish Cypriot official.
"There was only one way to go,
and that was up."
The economy, while still shaky,
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is in no immediate danger, al-
though the government of Arch-
bishop Makarios has been forced
to dip into reserve and, to satis-
fy demands for more ready cash,
to issue short-term notes at 5 per
cent interest.
The loss in tourist revenue-one
of Cyprus' main income producers
before the fighting - has been
largely made up by the spending
power of the nearly 6000 United
Nations troops and civilians and
through relief supplies and money
sent to the island's Turks by the
Turkish government.
While exports have remained
steady, imports have declined, thus
helping the balance of trade.
This eastern Mediterranean isle
has been relatively calm since Au-
gust 1964 when Turkish air force
jets pounded the northern coast.
The UN force has successfully sep-
arated the two warring factions.
The Greek Cypriots, still insist-
ing they can live peacefully with
the Turks, have promised them
safe passage through the island in
a move to get refugees to return
home.
But few refugees are return-
ing to homes in and near Greek
Cypriot areas, fearing for their
safety. The Greeks accuse the Tur-

kish leadership of holding the
Turks in concentrated areas to
promote their separatist aims.
What lies ahead?
The Makarios government is re-
lying primarily on the United Na-
tions to solve the problem and to
give the island self-determination
and unfettered independence. Ma-
karios has temporarily shelved the
subject of enosis-a proposal to
join Cyprus with Greece.
Makarios wants to get rid of
the 1959-60 Zurich and London
agreements which established the
island republic and its constitu-
tion.
The Greek Cypriots claim the
agreements gave the Turkish Cyp-
riot minority unfair advantages.
Warfare between the two com-
munities broke out when Makar-
ios announced late in 1963 he in-
tended to rewrite part of the
agreements.
While backing the international
treaties, the Turkish Cypriots, sup-
ported by Turkey, claim that a
durable peace can only be achiev-
ed through some type of federal
government--with separate Greek
and Turkish Cypriot states.
Meanwhile, life on both sides of
the border goes on slowly in the
heat.

Legal Minds
Debate over
Sp ace Rule
ATHENS lz)--In the day when
manned flight to the moon and
planets becomes a reality, what
law will apply in outer space?
Legal experts from around the
world debated the question yester-
day in a special session of the
16tht International Astronautical
Congress here. They figured it
was not too soon to find the
answer.
One expert posed the question
whether earthmen had the right
to extend their jurisdiction beyond
the moon. He suggested there
might be some other legally mind-
ed beings in the universe.
Some other questions were:
-Will industrialists be able to
set up plants ignoring the patents
of earthbound inventors?
-What nationality will be given
the work-legally the achievement
of science, literature, arts, pho-
tography-born in space?
-Who will investigate charges
of espionage or war provocation
by one nation against another as
a result of satellite or other space
activity?.
Janos Kiss of Hungary proposed
a "moon charer" for international
consideration.
His draft provides that the
earth's international law be ap-
plied to the moon, with all states
barred from claiming national
sovereignty over the moon. How-
ever, individual nations could set
up stations on the moon. Space
ships and lunar stations would be
subject to the law of the nation
under whose flag they operate.
War on the moon would be out-
lawed,
Another Hungarian, Imre Mora,
raised the problem of copyright
and patents for works created and
objects invented in space. He said
he felt "the law of the flag" fol-
lowed by ships at sea would apply.

(Continued on Page 2)
Akira Takahashi, assistant professor
of sociology. University of Tokyo. 1.304
Kashiwal-Nichome, Ichikawa, Chiba, Ja-
pan, Sept. 13-19.
Hans Renk. president of the student
body. University of Basel, correspond-
ent for the newspaper "Basler Nach-
richten, Switzerland. Sept. 19-23.
Pavel Eisler, associate professor of
economic history, Prague School of Eco-
nomics, Prague, Czechoslovakia. Sept.
20-22.
Placement
POSITION OPENINGS:
Social Security Admin., Ann Arbor-
Claims Repres, Immed. opening for man
or woman. BA any major. No exper.
req. Must take FSEE. Openings located
throughout midwest.
Farrel Corp., Ansonia, Conn.-Metal-
lurgist. BS Metal. 2-4 yrs. exper. Pro-
duction & research on heat treating
processes and materials (esp. ferrous).
Oakland County Corp. Counsel, Pon-
tiac, Mich.-Attorney. Immed. opening
for recent grad with exper. Apply state
law to county business.
New York Air Brake Co., Kalamazoo,
Mich.---Various openings including 1.
Foundry Engr., degree plus exper. with
auto, molding line. 2. Sr. Project Engr.
Knowl. of railroad air brake systems
helpful. Exper. In locomotive equip.
& accessories. 3. Budget Analyst. 2-5
yrs. exper. with mfg. budgets. 4. Mfg.
Trainee. BSIE, ME or EE. "B" aver-
age. Up to S yrs. exper. in indust.
Trng. leads to mfg. manager or plant
supv,
Sangamo Electric Co., Springfield, Ill.
-Various openings for engrs. includ-
ing Qual. Control, Sonar, Electronics
Des., Sales, Indust., Systems Reliabil-'
Ity, etc. Also 1. Admin. Ass't. Engrg.
degree plus 8 yrs. exper. Schedule jobs
report on labor, costs & projects. Knowl.
of govt. req. & military specs, help-
ful. 2. Technical writer. Degree, assoc.
engr., or equiv. exper. in electronics.
Tech. exper. pref., familiar with military
publications & personnel. Field engr. or
service repres. exper. helpful.
* * *
For further information, please call
764-7460, General Div., Bureau of Ap-
pointments, 3200 SAB.
TEACHER PLACEMENT:
The following schools have vacancies
for the present school semester:
DeTour Village Mich. (DeTour Twp.
Schs.)-Home Ec.
Flint, Mich.-Sr. High English.
Howard iCty, Mich. (Tri County Area
Schs.)-J.H. Phys. Ed./Soc. Stud. (H.S.

icoaching available), J'.H. Soc. Stud,
H.S. Math.
Interlochen, Mich. (Interlochen Arts
Academy)-Accompanist for Ballet De-
partment.
Kenosha, Wis.-Sr. High Bus. Ed.. J.H.
Ind. Arts/'Math.
Milan, Mch.-Speech Correction, 3rd
Grade.
Petersburg, Mich. (Summerfield Schsi
-Ind. Arts. Jr. Var. Football Coach.
J.H. Basketbali Coach.
Plainview, N.Y. (Central Bch. Disc.
No. 4) -Sr. High Math, J.H. Guidance
Counselor.
Plymouth, Mich.-Substitute teachers
for following subjects: Bus. Ed., Ind.
Arts, Foreign Lang., Math, Music (vocal
& Instr.), Boys Phys. Ed.
Roseville, Mich. - Visiting Teacher.
Speech Correctionists, Diagnosticians.
Waukegan, Ill. (Twp. High Sch. No.
119)-Sch. Social Worker, Director of
Testing.
Wayne, Mich.-Multiple Handicapped
Deaf, Visiting Teacher, Sr. High Auto
Mechanics, Sr. High Ind. Arts, Substi-
tute Teachers.
Western Springs, Ill. (Sch. Dist. 101)
-1st Grade-immediately, 5th grade-
start Oct. 18 or before Nov. 8.
Orchard Lake, Mich. (W. Bloomfield
J.H. Sch.)-J.H. Home Ec./Soc. Stud.,
Eng./Soc. Stud., Typing/English.
For additional information contact
the Bureau of Appointments, Educ. Div.,
3200 SAB, 764-7462.
ORGAN IZATION
NOTICES
Use of This Column for Announce-
ments is available to officially recog-
nized and registered student organiza-
tions only. Organizations who are plan-
ning to be active for the fall term
must be registered in the Office of
Student Organizations by Sept. 17, 1965.
Forms are available in Room 1011 SAB.
Baptist Student Union, Bible study
on "The Sermon on the Mount," Sept.
17, 7:30 p.m., 1131 Church St.
* , * *
Christian Science Organization,
Thursday evening testimony meeting,
Sept. 16, 7:30 p.m., Room 3545 SAB.
Cercle Francais, First meeting of se-
mester, students returning from Aix-
en-Provence will speak. New member-
ships will be taken. Thurs., Sept. 16,
8 p.m., 3050 Frieze Bldg.
Folk Dance Club, Folk dance with in-
struction Fri., Sept. 17, 8-11 p.m.,
Barbour Gym.
* a s
Full Gospel Student Fellowship
Meeting, Sept. 17, 7:30 p.m., Rev. Her-
bert Meppelink, director of Teen Chal-
lenge-Detroit; Movie "Teen Revolt,"
Evangel Temple, 409 S. Division.

4

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DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

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save 1 U yon new texts!
WHY NOT MICHIGAN?
S.G.C. Committee on the University Bookstore

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$799
CAMPUS MAST'S SHOP

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619 E. LIBERTY

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Sylvia Hamer, L..S.T.D.
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established 1932 0 Phone 668-8066-668-7227

WOULD YOU LIKE TO READ
1000 to 2000 WORDS A MINUTE
WITH FULL COMPREHENSION AND RETENTION,
EASE PRESSURE-SAVE TIME---IMPROVE CONCENTRATION
You can read 150-200 pages an hour using the ACCELERATED READING method.
You'll learn to comprehend at speeds of 1,000 2,000 words a minute. And retention is
excellent.
This is NOT a skimming method; you definitely read every word.
You can apply the ACCELERATED READING method to textbooks and factual material
as well as to literature and fiction. The author's style is not lost when you read at these
speeds. In fact, your accuracy and enjoyment in reading will be increased.
Consider what this new reading ability will enable you to accomplish-in your required
reading and in the additional reading you will want to do.
No machines, projectors, or apparatus are used in learning the ACCELERATED
READING method. In this way the reader avoids developing any dependence upon external
equipment in reading.
An afternoon class and an evening class in ACCELERATED READING will be taughtj
each TUESDAY at the Michigan Union beginning on October 12.
Be our guest at a 30-minute public demonstration of the ACCELERATED READING
method, and see it applied by U of M students who have recently completed the course,
BRING A BOOK!
Demonstrations will be held at the Michigan Union
THURSDAY, Sept. 16 at 7:30 P.M.
TUESDAY, Sept. 21 at 7:30 P.M.
THURSDAY, Sept. 23 at 7:30 P.M.
NATIONAL SCHOOL OF ACCELERATED READING,
18964 Coyle St. Inc. Detroit 35, Michigan
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SGC
NEEDS
YOU

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Across
Campus
THURSDAY, SEPT. 16
7:30 p.m.-The Steering: Com-
mittee for the Conference on Viet
Nam, a group supporting Presi-
dent Johnson's policy in' Viet-Nam,
is meeting in Room 32, of the
Union.
8 p.m.--The Ann Arbor Commit-
tee to End the War in Viet Nam
will hold an organizational meet-
ing in Auditorium A of Angell
Hall. This will be a committee of
students, faculty, and interested
citizens to plan and coordinate
local activities protesting the war
in Viet Nam.
FRIDAY, SEPT. 17
9:30 a.m.-The Alumnae Coun-
cil will hold its regular fall meet-
ing in the League.
1-5 and 7:30-9:30 p.m. - The
International Conference on Al-
ternative Perspectives will be hold-
ing open meetings to report the
findings of the study groups at
Rackham.
10 a.m.-2 p.m.-A teach-in for
the Viet Nam Conference on Al-
ternative Perspectives will be held
in the Auditorium complex of An-
gell Hall.
4:15 p.m.-The Department of
Psychology Colloquium will host
Dr. Edgar Epps of the psychology
department for a discussion of
"Motivation and Performance of
Negro Students" in Aud. B.
1 and 10 p.m.-The Internation-
al Conference on Alternative Per-
spectives on Viet Nam will meet
at Hill Aud. and Haven Hall.
7 and 9 p.m.-The Cinema Guild
will present Satjayit Ray's "Devi"
in the Architecture Aud.
SATURDAY, SEPT.18
11 a.m.-Action workshops for
the Viet Nam conference to de-
cide what action might be taken
in Viet Nam will be held in the
auditorium complex of Angell Hall.
11 a.m. - International Confer-
ence on Alternative Perspectives
on Viet Nam Workships will be
held. Location to be announced.
7 and 9 p.m.-The Cinema Guild
will present "Cyrano de Bergerac"
in the Architecture Aud,

4

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If you

are concerned about

university problems in the
areas of academic reform,
student economic welfare,
housing discrimination, etc.
JOIN SGC COMMITTEES

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