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September 15, 1965 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 1965-09-15

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PAGE TWO

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 15. 1985

PAGE TWO TIlE MICHIGAN DAILY WEDNF.SflAY. SPPTFMRFI?. liE I~iI~

ill Lt .,,11!AM i. } A7 AL X 11i11111L 1L ;.t7, 1UVJ

I

Washington: Fickle or Faithful, Always PC

litical

(Continued from Page 1)
haps due to-the amazing changes
which have occurred in the coun-
try's political climate in the past
months.
Most observers a year ago would
never have imagined that legisla-
tion of the scope and the depth
of the Voting Rights Act would
have ever been considered, let
alone signed into law in less than
six months after its introduction.
But politics goes on as usual,

which perhaps accounts for the
unexciting atmosphere in a city
where such exciting things are
occurring.
Washington is still a city where,
in the words of an anonymous re-
porter, a newsman can stay well-
fed and moderately drunk six
nights of the week.
Social Events
Everybody holds receptions, ban-
quets, cocktail parties, dinners,
and-in the case of a Republican
fund-raising gala-a bus convoy

Across Campus

to former President Dwight D.
Eisenhower's Gettysburg, Pa.,
farm.
And, for the press at least, it's
all free, from lemonade at the
White House to cocktails and din-
ner in the plush ninth floor of the
State Department at a reception
for (of all things) the Governors'
Committee on the Status of Wom-
en .
Working as a newsman is not
always easy, though, precisely be-
cause politics does go on as usual.
Dirksen
As the Senate neared a vote on
Sen. Everett Dirksen's (R-Ill)
c o n t r o v e r s i a 1 apportionment
amendment-mindful of Dirksen's
charges that the President had
broken his promise to remain neu-
tral in the fight because Vice-
President Humphrey was actively
lobbying against him-a Hum-
phrey aide told one newsman that
his boss "really isn't doing any-
thing."
"Actually, he's just going around
checking off names on a list of
senators," the aide continued.

"Dirksen's charges against Hubert
are a case of 'how to succeed in
politics without really trying'."
Humphrey's aide was, of course,
eager to play down his boss' in-
volvement-about as eager as
Humphrey was to defeat Dirksen.
Only Funny Man
Dirksen himself, however, says
Art Buchwald, the New York
Herald Tribune's political satirist,
has emerged as almost the only
funny man in a city otherwise
dominated by Lyndon Johnson.
Certainly, Dirksen has fantastic
popularity among newsmen, who
jam his weekly seance's in the
Senate press gallery with the eager
air of children waiting for a bed-
time story.
He rarely disappoints them.
Asked once what upcoming bills
he was concerned about, Dirksen
assumed an air of mock horror,
and croaked, "There's that bill to
create a federal boxing czar."
Boxing Commissioner
His picturesque face contorted
by the very thought of a federal
boxing commissioner, Dirksen

peered through his glasses at Mae
Craig, the Portland (Maine) Press-
Herald reported notorious for her
crotchety questions on Meet the
Press, and boomed out, "I don't
like that word 'boxing czar'-do
you, Mae?"
As Miss Craig assured Dirksen
she didn't either, such luminaries
as Roger Mudd of CBS, Sander
Vanocur of NBC, E. W. Kenworthy
of the New York Times and Ed-
ward Folliard of The Washington
Post all looked on entranced.
Dirksen, of course, combines
such frolic with political purpose,
but he is an exception. Taste pre-
vents a newsman from revealing
which prominent Michigan con-
gressman said soberly he'd rather
not answer an off-the-record
query on whether or not the CIA
was involved in changing politi-
cal events as well as reporting
them.
The Interns
And, of course, there are, in
addition to the adults, the vast
numbers of summer interns from

colleges and universities all over
the country.
While most of them come away
impressed with their elders, their
elders have not always been so
impressed with them.
"They don't want to work, they
want to have fun," growled one
congressman. "And when they
feel like working, they want to
write my speeches instead of typ-
ing them."
Best Crank Letter?
Some of the Capitol Hill in-
terns, conducting a contest for
the best crank letter, instead
found most humorous the letters
of semiliterate or indigent con-
stituents.
And, although Sen. Robert F.
Kennedy (D-NY) made an elo-
quent speech to a large group of
summer workers on the importance
of participating in government,'
what seemed most important to
most of the interns was seeing a
Kennedy before they returned
home.
But no one person or group-
save perhaps Lyndon Johnson--is

ever able to dominate the mood
of Washington for very long. Per-
haps one of its more colorful resi-
dents summed it up best.
Powell
Vaulting into one of the sub-
way cars that traverse the thou-
sand-foot distance from his office
in the hideous new Rayburn
Building to the Capitol after one
of his rare floor appearances, the
Honorable Adam Clayton Powell,

WEDNESDAY, SEPT. 15
Noon-Tony Stoneburner, doc-
toral candidate in the Department
of English, will lead an Office
of Religious Affairs Book Discus-
sion on "The Secular City" by
Harvey Cox in Room 2, Michigan
League.
3 p.m.-Richard A. Cloward,
professor of social work at Colum-
bia University, will address a so-

Member of Congress from Harlem.
chairman of the House Committee
on Edcation and Labor and min-
ister of the Abyssinian Baptist
Church, took a pull on his cigaril-
lo, beamed paternally at the in-
credulous group of touring Girl
Scouts beside him in the car, and
said:
"You're smart to visit Washing-
ton. The New York World's Fair
is terrible."

BEER-PIZZA-BANJOS
BIMBO'S

cial work-social science colloquium
on the subject "A Political An-
alysis of the Crisis over Mobiliza-
tion for Youth" in Aud. C.
4 p.m.-Karel Slama, Depart-
ment of Insect Physiology, Czech-
oslovakian Academy of Sciences
of Prague, will address a zoology
seminar on the subject "Hormonal
Control of Respiratory Metabolism
in Insects" in 231 Angell Hall.
THURSDAY, SEPT. 16
7 and 9 p.m.-The Cinema Guild
will present Satyajit Ray's "Devi"
in the Architecture Aud.
FREE reprint "How to'pick a new car for
below $2,000--a factual comparison of
18 imported automobiles." FREE Contest:
Win an NSU automobile. Write for FREE
reprint and contest blank to: Exc. U. S.
importer: Transcontinental Motors, Inc.,
421 East 91 Street, New York City 10028.
Tel: (212) .TR .6-7013.
- - - - - - - - - ~ - - - - - - -

!:"":::..v; .1 :n..4IrA" " '.: li V.' .W.W "!"" "C ,. . . y 4Y r::.YnY"!:.x".Y JJ;V' .sC9wAA"r. ..n A.Y144 ~..f.t--
DAILY OFFICIAL BULEI
k.ASZd lfl~W**.......?}t~.4. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..::f":}}:x4.r.F..n.. ?F .. .:}r..:{e... :..{. . ..r .n ...r:n ak: ' r -}}^{'{f~~r:.VJ"}:.5-v~ ":x}r.:.nn

Sylvia Studio
Sylvia Hamer, L.I.S.T.D.
V offers
CLASSICAL BALLET, C.M.
for
PROFESSIONAL-INTERMEDIATE O
and BEGINNERS
525 E. Liberty *
established 1932 ! Phone 668-8066--668-7227

11

IQC--ASSEMBLY PRESENTS
"YOUR RESIDENCE HALLS:
CLASSROOMS FOR LIVING"

The Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publication of the Univer-
sity of Michigan, for which The
Michigan Daily assumes no editor-
ial responsibility. Notices should be
sent in TYPEWRITTEN form to
Room 3564 Administration Bldg. be-
fore 2 p.m. of the day preceding
publication, and by 2 p.m. Friday
for Saturday and Sunday. General
Notices may be published a maxi-
mum of two times on request; Day
Calendar items appear once only.
Student organization notices are not
accepted for publication.
WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 15
Day Calendar
Programmed Learning for Business
Workshop-Paul G. Herrick, director,
"Using, Evaluating, Selecting, and Writ-
ing Programmed Materials": Michigan
Union, 8:30 a.m.
Office of Religious Affairs Book Dis-
cussion-Tony Stoneburner, doctoral
candidate, Department of English, "The
Secular City" by Harvey Cox: 2 Mich-
igan League, 12 m.
College of Engineering Computer Lec
ture-Brice Carnahan, Departments of
Chemical Engineering and Biostatistics,
"Digital Computation and the MAD
Language": Natural Science Aud., 7:30
p.m.

Lecture: Prof. R. Burgert, visiting ex-
change professor of accounting from
the Netherlands School of Economics,
will give a talk on "The Development
of Business Economics in Europe," 7:30
p.m., Wed., Sept. 15, Room 131, Busi-
ness Administration Bldg.
Faculty and students are cordially
invited to attend.
Research Club: There will be a meet-
ing for members of the Research Club
of the University of Michigan Wed.,
Sept. 15, 8 p.m., Rackham Amphitheatre.
Profs. Kennetr Boulding, Daniel Katz,
Herman Kelman, Anatol Rapoport and
J. David Singer will discuss "Research
on Conflict Resolution." The Council
will meet at 7 p.m. in the East Coun-
cil Room.

are most appropriate. Grants may cover
equipment, supplies, research assist-
ance, and field trips. Applications for
these grants should be returned to
the Phoenix Project by Thurs., Sept. 23.
Grants will be made by Nov. 1.
Application blanks may be obtained
from the office of the Phoenix Project
at the Phoenix Memorial Laboratory on
the North Campus or by calling 764-
6213.
University Orientation Leaders: Offi-
cial Fall Orientation leaders may pick
up their incentive checks in the lobby
of the Administration Bldg. Wed., Sept.
15 between 8 a.m.-5 p.m. Leaders are
also requested to keep their scheduled
appointments for photographs in 1560
Admin. Bldg. and bring into the Orien-
tation Office any outstanding materials
(wallets, meal tickets' evaluation

SUNDAY, SEPT. 19

2:00 P.M.

MICHIGAN LEAGUE
ALL URGED TO ATTEND

. forms).
Medical College Admission Test: Ap-
.lplication blanks for the Medical Col-
The Michigan Memorial-Phoenix Proy lege Admission Test are available in
ect invites requests for faculty re-I12RchmBd.Tenx di-
search grants to support research in sio of thetest Bldg. bThe Sat.nex Oct. 23,
those fields within the scope of the and applications must be received in
Project. Awards may be granted to New York, N.Y., by Oct.8.
assist investigations in the social, NewYor,_NY._byOct_8
philosophical, legal orneconomic as-
pects of nuclear energy; the physi--Placem ent
cal, mathematical and chemical as-
pects of nuclear theory; the use, of
radioisotopes in the biological, medical, ANNOUNCEMENTS:
physical and engineering sciences; ra- National Security Agency - NSA an-
diation-induced changes in physical nounces the 1965 Professional Qualifi-
and biological systems; and the re- cation Test for Liberal Arts Majors
lease, control and utilization of nu- with degrees awarded prior to Septem-
clear energy. ber 1966. Deadline for test registration
Requests for grants of $3000 or less is Oct. 13, 1965. Test Bulletin and
ORGANIZATION NOTICES
+rX:[.:i":2v.... ":.......". ..} .. . :r}.."'. "":S":? r ':" {''"::}'.. . , n.rV. r...:,.. .{".r:2'F....r...rr.ttr"rv..r"."".rs. r r:".rr:.:.:.nv.,nA"r"":v}}nvt . :..r"...... .. . x

Application Form may be obtained
from the Bureau of Appointments, 3200
SAB.
POSITION OPENINGS:
Life Insurance Company, Columbus,
Ohio-Assistant to the Director of Edu-
cation and Training in the Marketing
Department. Major in business admin-
istration, economics or education and
3-5 yrs. successful experience in life
insurance sales. 28-38 years old.
G. D. Searle & Co., Chicago, Ill. -
Chemical research division. Recent
graduates with either a Master's or
Bachelor's degree in Chemistry.
Aluminum Company of Canada, Ltd.,
Montreal-Engineers and Scientists who
have majored in Chemistry and Chem-
ical Engineering, Physics, Metallurgy,
Electrical Engineering, Mathematics,
Mechanics, Mechanical Engineering,
Civil Engineering, Geology, etc.
The Singer Company, Metrics Divi-
sion, Bridgeport, Conn. - Engineers,
Manager, and Foreman to concentrate
effort on electronics business. Degree
and experience required.
* * *
For further information, please call
764-7460, General Div., Bureau of Ap-
pointments, 3200 SAB.
TODAY IS
LADIES'DAY
50c until 6 p.m.

SHOWS AT
7-9 P.M.

4CMWRI

WILLIAM WYLER S
"A SHOCKER sure to quicken the pulse!. TiME
"A SHOCKER to rivet you to your seat!SVENTU,
An electrifying experience!"
--N.Y. DALY TEWS
A WARD
WINNER!
Cama FimFrora
"BEST ACRESS' " ":
SAMANTAr:

*
F

DIAL
8-6416

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Sigma Alpha Iota
cale-Recital Hall,
8:30 p.m.

and Mu Phi Musi-
School of Music,

h. I

RENT A TRUCK
663-2019
E(ON-O-(AR

The Kingston
Trio Returns !
Saturday
September 18
Hill Auditorium
8:00 P.M.

I

I

WANTED!
NAVY VETERANS
PETTY OFFICERS
JUNIOR OFFICERS
-to earn drill pay
with a drilling
Reserve unit

Use of This Column for Announce-
ments is available to officially recog-
nized and registered student organiza-
tions only. Organizations who are plan-
ning to be active for the fall term
must be registered in the Office of
Student Organizations by Sept. 17, 1965.
Forms are available in Room 1011 SAB.
Alpha Phi Omega, .Business meeting
and pledging in, Sept. 15, 7 p.m., Room
3B, Michigan Union.
* * *
Cerele Francais, First meeting of se-
mester, students returning from. Aix-
en-Provence will speak. New member-
ships will be taken. Thurs., Sept. 16,
8 p.m., 3050 Frieze Bldg.
* * *
University Lutheran Chapel, Ves-
pers, 10 p.m.. Ded., Sept. 15. Assistant
Pastor Scheidt's message "The Spirit
vs. the Law," 1511 Washtenaw.
* * *
U. of M. Rifle Club, First open meet-
ing, everyone interested in shooting or
learning to shoot welcome, Sept. 15,
7:15 p.m., ROTC Rifle Range, near

Forest and North University.
* **
Young Republicans, Discussion of
constitutional revisan, Wed., Sept. 15,
2-3:30 p.m., Room 2535 SAt. All mem-
bers welcome.
* . *
Lutheran Student Center and Chapel,
Wednesday vesper service at 10 p.m.,
Lutheran Student Chapel, Hill St. at
South Forest Ave.

-i
INRGDA
R4LPA
SSPA
O EASY
Shows at 1 :00-3:05 I
5:05-7:00 & 9:05
EASTMANCOLOR
.ASED UNITED ARTISTS
DIAL 662-6264
t-

PRIDE-PAY-PROMOTION
CALL 663-6063
After 6 p.m. except Tuesday

'

'I

GARGOYLE
MASS MEETING
has been postponed

DOUGOUT
CAFETERIA
Fried Chicken Seafood
Steaks and Chops
Open Mon. thru Sat. 7 a.m.-8 p.m.
Cafeteria Style 7 a.m.-5 p.m.
Will Serve 5 p.m.-8 p.m.
GOOD PRICE
1121 S. University
PH. 483-4680
k E~c. axuOw.CARPENTE~tR' RA
NOW SHOWING
ELIZABETH TAYL.OR
RICHARD BURTON
EVA MARIE SAINT
ADDED-COMEDY HIT
Jane Fonda-Tony Franciosa

....

""

=510F,

I

I

4
Pt

I

FRIDAY
He Came-He Saw-
He Tinkered!
"CARRY ON
CLEO"
Bedlam On The Nile

Order Your Daily Now-
Phone 764-0558

JAMES STEWART
SHENANDOAH!

i

I

from

WED., SEPT. 15

"RUB RAW THE SORES OF DISCONTENT"
THE CREDO FOR ORGANIZATION OF THE POOR
Keynote Speaker of the Challenge Lecture Series:
CAN A MASS SOCIETY BE A GREAT SOCIETY?

to

WED., SEPT. 22

2 CARTOONS AT DUSK
BOX OFFICE OPENS 6:30

-..

SAUL ALINSKY
presented by

INDIVIDUAL TICKETS-Sept. 13

The DRAMATIC ARTS CENTER presents
A Festival of Spectacular Theatre Music and Dance
ONCE AGAIN 1965

Hill Aud. Box Office

and

9 A.M.-4 P.M.

SEPT. 17: UNMARKED INTERCHANGE, an original total-theatre work by Ann

III -Ir/1

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