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September 05, 1965 - Image 2

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1965-09-05

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PAGE TWO

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

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PAGE TW& iEEE MICIIIf~A~ 1b.iII.V

Z JUAIA 1 , hLMIJER 5Z, ,1965

Voice, Liberals Hold Retreat
To Discuss Student Activism

'PREDICTABLE' MOVIE:
Shenandoah: Civil War
Claims Another Victim

(Continued from Page 1)
lousy paperback? I refuse!,' and
goes out to form a cooperative
bookstore and fight for lower
prices."
Dissatisfaction
The speakers and their audience
seemed to be dissatisfied with the
rate of progress being made in
the areas of civil rights and in
reform of U.S. policy in Viet Nam.
On the local level, student eco-
nomicwelfare and lack of quality
and meaning in the education be-
ing offered at the University were
the main rallying points.
All were agreed generally on
what. was to be done; all agreed
that the system's normal chan-
nels of operation--legislation, ad-
ministration, standard communi-
cation-had failed and would, for
their purposes, continue to fail,
and thus were of little or no value
to them.
"Liberals" and "liberalism" rep-
resented more a "hypocritical
stab-in-the-back establishment"-
one which is willing to accept the
"in-ness" of being left while at
the same time fighting to pre-
serve the very "socio-politico-eco-
nomic system which produced the
need in the first place."
Thus, many of the participators
^seemed to look with scorn at those
who remain within the system's
institutions and do not jump out-
side of it - to the areas of the
picket line, the sit-in, and civil
disobedience. It is here they must,
according to the students, protest
and, in fact, fight the entire
structure of society, rather than
just placating its temporary ills,
ills which seemed to the discus-
sants inevitable under our present
system.
Following the discussion, five
films were shown, occupying about
a two-hour span. One film dealt
with poverty and despair among
the Negroes of Newark, N.J. Negro
women who could never get any-
thing more -than menial labor

were heard talking, while films of
run-down, over-crowded, rat in-
fested Negro slum areas were
shown.
The film told of how, when one
section of Newark was deserted
by its white residents,rlandlords
began "raising the rents and
stopped coming around to fix
things. Twenty-three families lived
where once there were eight."
Student Action
The other films, except for one
showing Oregon's liberal Senator

Wayne Morse denouncing the
U.S.'s Viet Nam policy, generally
dealt with the topics of Negro
poverty and mistreatment in the
South, and with the actions of
the Student Non-Violent Coordi-
nating Committee in civil rights
work.
Then, a record player was pro-
cured and the writhing sounds of
"Satisfaction" filled the hall, at
which point it was evident that
the evening's discussions were
over.

By FRITZ MILLER
One leaves the movie "Shenan-
doah" feeling two hours older.
This is not a movie to see but to
sit through. It is not an entire
waste because there is a nice
soundtrack and lots of techni-
color shots of Virginia country-
side and Civil War battles. But
there are sounds and sights that
have appeared in numerous past
movies.
"Shenandoah" is the story of
the Anderson family, headed by
good old Poppa Anderson, James
Stewart. In the Shenandoah val-
ley of Virginia he raises his large
family to stay out of the Civil
War.

The Week To Come:
A Campus Calendar

love is the most wonderful feeling
in the world."
Need I say more? And one can-
not help but get a little misty
watching the Andersons sit down
for dinner with an extra place set
for the departed mother of the
family.
The movie makes such obvious
attempts at creating emotional
situations, at tear-jerking, when
in effect Shenandoah only goes
through the motions with emo-
tions. Sadness is more than a trite
situation with violin accompani-
ment. Piling one emotional epi-
sode upon another is done in
countless soap operas every week.
Yep
In the midst of all stands James
Stewart. His innimical manner-
isms . . . dry whit, drawling articu-
lation, four second "Yep's," and
intense delivery of his charac-
terization . . . raise Stewart above
his mediocre surroundings. Stew-
art is gauche but good. He is also
the one with all the funny lines.
Unfortunately the spirit of
Stewart cannot carry the burden
of the remainder of Shenandoah.
I have little doubt that many will
see it and that it may be enter-
taining to some. But if you go to
find escape, you may find your-
self wishing to return to reality.

DIAL 668-6416
lglorious:'
Iu
-N.Y. Post
0 AND 0
*IALLRIGHT#**0**
iM cRM Aa
LU S I IiI

Dial Shown at 1:00
662-6264 ____ "._________ _3:00-5:00-7:00 &T 9:05
Ala in Delon -Ann-Margret
Van HeflIn Jack Palance
Once a ililef
- always a target, for either
side of the law!

*

TUESDAY, SEPT. 7
1 p.m.-Prof. Edwin Miller of
the B u s i n e s s Administration
School and Joseph Augustine,
manager of employment services,
will speak at the Department of
Training and Development Sem-
inar "On - the - Job Interviewing
and Counseling" in the Union.
7:30 p.m.-The Department of
Speech will hold a varsity debate
on law enforcement agencies in
2008 Frieze Bldg.
WEDNESDAY, SEPT. 8
Noon-Elizabeth Sumner, pro-
gram assistant, Office of Religious
Affairs, will speak on "The Secu-
lar Meaning of the Gospel" by
Paul van Buren and "God Is No
More" by Werner and Lotte Peltz
in Conference Room 2, Union.
4:30 p.m.-Prof. Donald Brown,
of the Center for Research on
Learning and Teaching," will dis-
cuss "The Negro Revolt" by Louis
Lomax, in the Multipurpose Room
of the UGLI.
7 p.m. -Michifish will hold a
meeting for prospective members
in the Women's Pool.
7:30 p.m.-Prof. Brice Carna-
han of the departments of chem-
ical- engineering and biostatistics

will speak on "Digital Computa-
tion and the MAD Language" in
Natural Science Aud.
7:30 p.m.-The Young Republi-
can Club will hold a mass meet-
ing in Room 3R, Union.
8 p.m. - Michifish will hold a
meeting for old members in the
Women's Pool.'
THURSDAY;SEPT. 9
10 a.m.-The American Associa-
tion of University Women will
hold their 13th Annual Used Book
Sale from 10 a.m. until 9 p.m. in
the shop room of the SAB.
1 p.m.-Prof. Edwin Miller and
Joseph Augustine will speak at
the seminar "On-the-Job Inter-
viewing and Counseling" in the
Union.
FRIDAY, SEPT. 10
9 a.m.-The American Associa-
tion of University Women will
hold their 13th Annual Used Book
Sale in the shop room of the SAB
until 1 p.m.
SATURDAY, SEPT. 11.
8 p.m. Vice-President for
Student Affairs Richard Cutler
will welcome University foreign
students in Rackham Lecture Hall.
A reception will follow in the
League Ballroom.

Faults
The obvious faults of Shenan-
doah are the acting, the plot, and
the dialogue. All of Stewart's sup-
porting cast play their roles in
black and white: they handle
their innocuous parts in an equal-
ly meaningless manner.
The plot is entirely predictable,
and replete with stock situations.
There is the scene where the boy
asks for the hand of the girl and
then trips over a stool in the
presence of the father.
Besides the poor plot, the dia-
logue is trite. For example: "Being
married to someone you really
ORGANIZATI

U

ON NOTICES

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INTERFRATERNITY COUNCIL
invites
ALL
UNAFFILIATED MEN
~iI ITo Hear
BumTp" Elliot
~ At, The
I~jMNASS RUSH MEETING

It

Use of This Column for Announce-
ments is available to officially recog-
nived and registered student organiza-
tions only. Organizations who are plan-
ning to be active for the fall term
must be registered in the Office of
Student Organizations by Sept. 17. 1965.
Formsnare available in Room 1011 SAB.
** *
Graduate Outing Club, Hiking and or
canoeing, Sept. 5, 1:30 p.m..Rackham,
Huron St. entrance.

Lutheran Student Center and Chapel.
Worship services Sun., Sept. 5, 9:30 and
11 a.nm.; Student panel discussion on
"How Can We Apply Our Christian
Faith to Our Campus Life" at 7 p.m.,
Hill St. at S. Forest, Lutheran Stu-
dent Center and Chapel.
* *k
University of Michigan Dames, First
organizational meeting, Wed., Sept. 8,
8 p.m., Michigan Union Ballroom. All
student wives are invitedato attend:
Destiny Dames-1965.

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DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETI

U. of 2i. Libertarian League and U. of
M. Young Americans for Freedom will
have their organizational meetings at
8 p.m., Room 3D, Michigan Union on
Tues., Sept. 7.
Young Republicans, Executive Board
W meeting, Sept. 7, 4 p.m., 2535 SAB.

i I

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The Daily Official Suolletin is an
official publication of the Univer-
sity of Michigan for which The
Michigan Daily assumes no editor-
lal responsibility. Notices should be
sent in TYPEWRITTEN form to
Room 3864 Administration Bldg. be-
fore 2 p.m. of the day preceding
publication, and by 2 p.m. Friday
for Saturday and Sunday. General
Notices may be published a maxi-
mum of two times on request; Day
talendar items appear once only.
Student organization notices are not
accepted for publication.
SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 5
Day Calendar
No Events Scheduled.
Events Monday
No Events Scheduled.
General Notices
Auditions for Marching Band An-
nouncer: Auditions are now being held
for the position of announcer with
the University of Michigan Marching
Band, for the 1965 season. Persons in-
terested in auditioning, should con-
tact Dr. William D. Revelli, conductor
of bands, at the School of Music, 764-
0582.
Applications for Fulbright Awards for
Graduate Study during the 1966-67
academic year are now available. Coun-
tries in which study grants are of-
fered. are Afghanistan, Argentina, Aus-
tralia, Austria, Belgium-Luxembourg,
Bolivia, Brazil, Ceylon, Chile, China
(Republic of), Colombia, Costa Rica,
Denmark, Dominican Republic, Ecua-
dor, El Salvador, Finland, France, Ger-
'many (Federal. Republic of), Greece,
Guatemala, Haiti, Honduras, Iceland,
India, Iran. Ireland, Italy, Japan, Ko-
rea, Malaysia, Mexico, Nepal, The Neth-
erlands, New Zealand, Nicaragua, Nor-.
way, Pakistan, Panama, Paraguay, Peru,
the Philippines, Portugal, Spain, Swe-
den, Thailand, Turkey, United Arab'
Republic, the United Kingdom, Uru-
guay, and Venezuela. The grants are
made for one academic year and in-
clude round-trip transportation, tui-
tion, a living allowanceand a small
stipend for books and equipment. All
girants are made in foreign curren-
cIes.
Interested students who are U.S. citi-
zens and hold an A.B. degree, or who
will receive such a degree by May,
1966, and who are presently enrolled in
the University of Michigan, should re-

quest application forms for a Fulbright
award at the Graduate fellowship Of-
fice, Room 110 Rackham Bldg. The
closing date for receipt of applications
is Oct. 18, 1965.
Persons not enrolled in a college or
university should direct inquiries and
requests for applications to the Insti-
tute of International Education, U.S.
Student Program, 809 United Nations
Plaza, New York, N.Y. 10017. The last
date on which applications will be is-
sued by the Institute is Oct. 15, 1965.
Placement
ANNOUNCEMENTS:
Peace Corps Placement Test-Deter-
mines in what capacity you can best
serve. Test will be given Sat., Sept. 11,
9 a.m. at downtown Post Office, Main
and Catherine. To take test question-
naire must be completed. Details and
applications available at Bureau of Ap-
pointments.
Federal Service Entrance Exam-FSEE
applications must be in by Sept. 15
for exam given on Oct. 16. Applica-
tions available at Bureau of Appoint-
ments.
POSITION OPENINGS:
Disco Engrg., Inc., Detroit-Technical

writer. Man or woman, BS science
bkgd. helpful. Able to comprehend
mech. designs, drawings, etc. No exper.
required.
Automotive Rubber Co., Inc., Detroit
-Engineer for air pollution control.
Good bkgd. in chem. Some sales &
field testing & traveling required.
City of Lansing, Mich.-Openings in
various fields including urban plan-
ning; Civil, Arch., & Landscape En-
grg.; and Zoology. No exper. required.
Swift & Co., Chicago-Various open-
ings including Mktg. Trainees, Opera-
tions Research Trainees, Chemists, En-

gineers, etc. Also 1. Mech. Engrs. for
machine R. & D., BS & ME, 0-5 yrs.
exper. 2. Advertising. Degree, bkgd. in
advtg., up to 5 yrs. exper.
For further information, please call
764-7460, General Div., Bureau of Ap-
pointments, 3200 SAB.
SUMMER PLACEMENT SERVICE:
212 SAB-
Hoover Chemical Products Div., Whit-
more Lake, Mich.-Students for labor
on one of two shifts. $2.25 per hour.
Full time. Details 212 SAB.

!

1

I

Shown at 1 :00
3:00-5:00-7:00 & 9:10

I

kgl
'UNION

31 11111A

BALLROOM

,rues., Sept. 7

7:30 p.i.

READING & DISCUSSION
SEMI NAR
from UAC
PROF. DONALD BROWN
SPEAKS ON LOUIS LOMAX'S
NEW BOOK
THE NEGRO REVOLT

I

4

I

Air

I

UA(c

announces

THE NEW
Enthsfu 0tCARPENTER ROAD
NOW SHOWING
a i
PLUS--

-~

I

I

SEPT. 8
4:30 P.M.

multipurpose room
undergraduate library

£l

*Michigan's writer in residence

I

,U

1

SUBSCRIPTION OFFICE
OPEN WEEKDAYS, 10-1, 2-5

U

MASS, MEETING
September 8, 7:30
League Ballroom
-TRYOUTS FOR SINGERS,
DANCERS AND ACTORS
-CENTRAL COMMITTEE CHAIRMEN*
-COMMITTEES AND CREWS
LEONARD BERNSTEIN'S VIBRANT MUSICAL

A

I

1 -COLORSCOPEr

I

*ssuaumnuaanmunummnmmsmsmmnmmmmummmmmmmmmu-M
T I
TONIGHT and SUNDAY
I r
CINEMA GUILD
presents
CHAPLIN'S COMEDY CLASSIC
"MODERN TIMES"
with PAULETTE GODDARD
I I
"Modern Times" is one of Charlie Chaplin's
aS
funniest and most penetrating of social satires.:
r I
ON THE SAME PROGRAM:
The story of the Mississippi Civil Rights struggle-
It1r0- - - - - - - - - - - - - - --l. am o IL 19 - -& 1 Is

I

14

FE

rl

I9

1 1 The' vofienant dramat.,n.,ic .I I classicM ITF~14APA~1~i

I I ' CENTRA[_ COMMITTEE CHAIRMANSHIPS:

t.' I

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