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September 03, 1965 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1965-09-03

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PAGE TWO

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

FRIDAY, SE ; IWS

PAGE TWO TIlE MICHIGAN DAILI FRIDAY. SEPTEMBES 2. 1'~C5

, . r ai a iua auLri.y vy V aV VY

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Crawford, Basehart Spark 'Il Bidone'
With Poignantly Humerous Performances

By MICHAEL JULIAR
That nemesis of the Highway
Patrol, chubby and flat-faced,
emerges from the big, black, dust-
soaked car with all the solemnity
and beatitude a monseignor should,
have and tells the peasants in a
tired Italian that he is swindling
therm out of their 70 dollars in
savings. Of course, they don't
understand him and he leaves
later that day with no qualms,
and a handful of bills.
Yet we understand him-Brod-
erick Crawford. We knew why he
always got his man on TV. Here,
in Federico Fellini's "Il Bidone".
(The Swindle), made in 1955, he
always gets - his sucker, until he
tries to pull a stupid swindle

tight at his jaw, that carriage,
as if he were carrying two bags
of potatoes under his armpits,
that quiet face of fat boys whoJ
are always trying to keep up with1
life, but are always left behind-
these are the visual terms in
which Fellini and Crawford 'havea
presented us with a swindler, sep-l
arated from his wife, exposed be-
fore his daughter -and . subtly
taunted by his more successful
swindler friends.
Illuminating and Vibrant
This is not one of Fellini's bet-
ter films, but it is more illumi-
nating and more vibrant than all
but 10 or 12 films that will come1
to the campus this school year.
It has that jocular humor of Italy
that is rather poignant than so-
phisticated. It has Fellini's wife,
Giulietta Masina, that happy-sad
waif of "La Strada" and "Le Notti1

di Cabiria." Here unfortunately,
she is only a maudlin character
who adds little to what Richard
Basehart, as her husband - a
painter and colleague of Crawford
-is creating: a man who wants
to be like Crawford, the old pro.
And, naturally Crawford wants to
be like Basehart, the family man.
The superb acting in "Il Bidone"
(evident in every Fellini film I
have seen from "La Strada" to
"La Dolce Vita"; "82" is another
At The Cinema Guild
thing) and the pizzicato direction
never let us down.
Unfortunately, most of us, as
Americans and non-Catholic, miss
much in Fellini's films. Their ever
present concern with Italian Ro-
man Catholicism leaves a Pocket

empty in our minds while we stuff
ourselves with its more clear so-
cial or human significances. That"
is why I fail to see the "contro-
versial 'anti-religiosity'" that the
Cinema Guild is using as a come
on to get us to see "Il Bidone."
Yes, Crawford uses a swindle to
take money from peasants that is
little different from what the
Church probably does. But this
is a point barely stressed. Craw-
ford's own swindle of the peas-
ants and probably his wife meta-
morphoses into a swindle of him-
self.
The "anti-religiosity" lies fallow
for me. I only hope someone,
someday writes a book on Roman
Catholicism in Italian movies, so
that we can better understand this
important theme in the films of
Fellini, Antonioni, Pasolini, Mon-
icelli and Germi.

Chaplin Has
Good Time
In 'Times'
By MALINDA BERRY
It's an almost meaningless task
to review a Charlie Chaplin mo-
vie because all of them are great
--some just more great than oth-
ers.
"Modern Times," this weekend's
Cinema Guild offering, is overall
not one of the best Chaplin's. It
is uneven and lacks continuity.
But there are moments which are
marvelous and which more than
justify seeing the film.
This picture has been labeled a
social satire. The beginning se-
quencesconcern The Tramp at
work in a stereotyped assembly
line factory. There is an empha-
sis on man's struggle to retain his
humanity in the machine age. The
great gears and screws of the
horrible factory aresobviously ma-
licious and out to destroy the man
who fights the regimentation.
Chaplin's foreward states that
"'Modern Times' is the story of
industry, of individual enterprise
-humanity crusading in the pur-
suit of happiness."
The shadow of social injustice
lays over the entire film-unem-
ployment, strikes, police brutality.
But it doesn't dominate. That is
why, when the film was released in
1936, people were puzzled as to
the purpose of the film. It looked
political at the beginning, but
that fizzled out one-third of the
way through.
The ultimate key to "Modern
Times" is The Tramp of Chaplin's
original description of the charac-
ter-"You know, this fellow is
many-sided, a tramp, a gentleman,
a poet, a dreamer, a lonely fel-
low, always hopeful of romance
and adventure."

NSA Calls for Free College;
Asks Support of Businessmen

0

By MEREDITH EIKER
In addition to encouraging the
formation of student lobbies to
help end de facto financial, dis-
crimination, legislation passed in
Madison, Wis., at the annual con-
vention of the National Student
Association called for equal edu-'
cational opportunity and free
public higher education.
Headed by Barry Bluestone, '65,
the University delegation to ..the,
convention initiated the legisla-
tion that centered around student
economic welfare in two commit-
tees. Along with the New Jersey
Committee for Undergraduate Ed-
ucation and a delegation from the
City College of New York and the
New York metropolitan area, the
University students brought pres-
sure on the NSA national staff
by means of direct mandates
which hopefully will lead to unit-
ed action by civic leaders in ef-

forts to expand the opportuni- er education through free tuition
ties for higher education_ ad idizl f t h - ino

bb U 1g1 uUt uu.
Bluestone explained that the+
NSA's basic policy declaration,,
passed by almost unanimous ap-,
proval, asked for "free public high-
er education across the board."
"Opportunity for full education
of all society," he said, is nec-
essary "in order for society to re- i

an u su,,a o~n of the adttonal
costs (room, board, etc.) of this
education."
NSA Student Service
In the past, NSA has worked
primarily in student service -
providing help to those already
in universities and colleges across
the nation, Bluestone said. An im-

against
for it.
Those

his colleagues and dies
heavy jowls that grip

main critical, dynamic, and demo- portant and liberalizing change in
cratic , ynattitude has taken place, however.
cratic . . .
'Complexities' Now the organization seeks to
"The complexities of modern expand college opportunities by
society demand that education be actively working to cut expenses
commensurate with these com- and thereby allowing, more people
plexities so as to insure that all to take advantage of these edu-
of the people will have the abil-cationeal opportunities offered,
ity to participate in the demo- Bluestone added.
cratic process free from manipula- For example, were a student
tion." lobby to be formed along these
The legislation passed under lines with the intention of bring-
the heading of university de facto ing pressure upon the Michigan
financial discrimination referred stateLegislature, the, NSApro-
to the high cost of' college edu- fessional staff would be sent to'
cation and the discrimination in assist, Bluestone said. The goal
favor of the wealthy which re- of effective cooperation and lead-
sults. ership among civic leaders as well
This mandate to NSA officials would further provide the support
directed them to aid member necessary for prompt and effi-
schools in the formation of stu- cient action.
dent lobbies and workshops which The work completed at this
would "initiate the establishment year's convention is seen by Blue-
of an inter-institutional move- stone as an important accom-
ment involving students, educa- plishment. However, it is only a
tors, businessmen, labor leaders, beginning and will require the
religious leaders, and civil rights concentrated efforts of numerous
leaders with the purpose of work- groups throughout the country, he
ing toward a system of free high- said.

t
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DAI.lLY 0OF FI CIA L BUL L ET IN

Across,
Campus
FRIDAY, SEPT. 3
9-5 p.m.-Students interested

The Daily Official Bulletin, is an
official publication of the Univer-
sty of Michigan, for which The e
Michigan Daily assumes no editor- t
ial responsibility. Notices should beI
sent in TYPEWHITTEN form to N
Room 3564 Administration Bldg. be- E
fore 2 p.m. of the day preceding
p.ublication, and by 2 p.m. Friday s
for Saturday and Sunday. General ;
Nboices may be published a maxi-
"mum of two times on request; Day I
Calendar- items appear once only.
Student organization notices are not
accepted for publication.
FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 3
Day Calendar
No Events Scheduled.
General Notices
Science Awards of $200 each are;
amailable as part of an undergraduate1
research participation program in bio-
logical science, sponsored by the De-
partment of Zoology and the National1
Science Foundation. In this prograrm,
students participate in current re-
search programs of staff members, or1
engage in semi-independent projects1
guided by staff members in areas of
interest' Awards are mncde on a* com-
petitive baais, with interest In and
aptitude fo research being a nrimary
consideration. Interested persons should
request iteratiure and application forms
for "NSF Undergraduate Program 1965-
66" at the Zoology bepartment office,
2091 N.S. Deadline Sept. 10, 1965 'for
submitting applicatlons.

Student Government Council Appro'aI
of the-. following student-sponsored
events becomes effective 24 hours after
the publication o fthis notice. All
publicity >for these events must be
withheld until the approval has become
effective.
Approval request forms for student
sponsored events are available in Room
1011 of the SAB.
Voice, Retreat, Sept. .3-5, University
Fresh Air Camp.
-events
The following sponsored student
events are approved for the coming
weekend. Social chairmen are remind-
ed that requests for approval for social
events are due in the Office of Stu-
dent Affairs not later than 12 o'clock,
noon on Tuesday prior to tne event'
FRI., SEPT. 3-
Alpha Kappa Alpha, Welcome Back
to School Dance; Sigma Hu House, Open
House; Evans Scholars, House party;
Phi. Kappa Tau, Party.
SAT., SEPT. 4-
Kappa -lpha Psi, Party; Anderson
House, East Quad,Open-Open; Chi Phi,
Open-=Open;- Frost, House, Markley,
Open-Open; Kappa Sigma, Open House;
Evans Scholars, House Party; Phi Kap-
pa Tau, Party, Open-Open; Theta Chi,
Party.
I

.................................

SUN., SEPT. -
Evans Scholars, House Party..
MON., SEPT. 6-
Prescott House, Labor Day Picnic.
Placement
POSITION OPENINGS:
Richardson, Gordon & Assoc., Pitts-
burgh, Pa.-Chief" Soil Engr. BSCE plus
5 yrs. exper. in soil mechanics &
foundations. Grad degree in soil work
desirable. Supv. field and lab., testing,
eval., analysis, etc.
B. F. Goodrich Co., Akron, Ohio -
Various openings including 1. Commu-
nication repres., BS Journ. plus 3 yrs.
exper. in newspaper or indust. editing.
2. Patent.attorney. Degree in Chem. &
Law. 4 yrs. exper. 3. Analytical Chem-
ists. MS or PhD in anal. chem. to
conduct res. 4. Tax: Accountant. Degree
plus 2 yrs. tax exper. Also program-
mers, engineers, mkt. res. analyst, audi-
tors, etc.
Marinette Marine Corp., Marinette,
Wis.-Personnel Manager for fabrica-
tor of boats & bridge components, De-
gree in personnel pref. Age 28-35, mar-
ried. IDandle interviewing & hiring, la-
bor relations, etc..
J. W. Greer Co., Wilmington, Mass. -
1. Project engrs. BSME plus 5 yrs. de-

sign & application exper. 2. Sales
Trainees, BSME or equiv. leads to sales
engr. Much travel.
.* , *

in

For .further information, please
764-7460, General Div., Bureau of
pointments, 3200 SAB.

Call
Ap-

SUMMER PLACEMENT SERVICE:
212 SAB-_-
Hoover Chemical Products Div., Whit-
more Lake, Mich.-Students for labor
on one of two shifts. $2.25 per hour.
Full time. Details 212 SAB.
TEACHER PLACEMENT:
Vacancies for the 1965-66 school year:
Anoka, Minn. (Anoka; State Hospital)
-Emotionally Disturbed.
Boise, Idaho--Sr. High Boys Counse-;
lor.

Culver, Ind. (Culver Military Acade-
my(--Coll. Prep. History. Society may wish to force the
Detroit, Mich.-Sec. Sch. Counselors free spirit to conform-but in
(qualifying exams will be held Oct. 23- Chaplin movies it never does.
Last date to file is Oct. 1). That's perhaps one reason why
htoeDetroit, Mich.-e eM:. Art. 1 ae
Detoitr i k-em . A(t, J y the films are so satisfying. The
Boys Training School)-Training Sch. Tramp escapes the clutches of
Counselors-3: "civilization" and we who are rel-
* * *alvltrpebytesse cn
For additional information contact atively trapped by the system can
the Bureau of Appointments, Education rejoice that the spark, in
Division, 3200 SAB, 764-7462. men's souls still burns.

r

i

attending the retreat being spon-
sored by the University of Michi-
gan Student Employees' Union
Voice political party and the Stu-
dent Nonviolent Coordinating
Committee can sign up on th
Diag. The retreat will be held this
weekend at the University's Fresha
Air Camp.
12 p.m.-Prof. Kenneth Bould-
ing of the economics department
will speak on "The Great Transi-
tion; The Meaning of the Twen-
tieth Century" at the Guild House
802 Monroe St.
7 and 9 p.m. - Cinema Guild
presents Federico Felini's "Il Bi-
done."
SATURDAY, SEPT. 4
A retreat sponsored by Voice.
UMSEU and SNCC will be held
at the University Fresh Air Camp
DIAL 668-64.16
glorious:
-N.Y. Post
. AND .
* 'MALLRIGHT.'0.0
SELLERS
UACK[AM CAIIMICBE
IERRY- IIOM~i
NEXT!
"THE
COLLECTOR"

7
7
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1
4
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. .. . . . ... . .. ....... .....

,rIUDtO%
*They reached for their rifles
. in the "name of love... NR
not hate ...to challenge TSB
two mighty armies! J
andROSMAR FO
I
:: STnArm DOUGMCLRE "GLENN COR
PATRICK VAYNE - KATHARINE 1
and ROSEVARY FOR
with PHILLIP ALFORD - PAUL FIX " JAMES
wnittuyA l iiiEIT. ireU~ yANRRWY. ctlCiEtl ?r i1R1RAI ahi
TNTS TODAY
.wn at 1:00
3:©-5:00-7:00t
and 9:00

iiiiitiiitsiitriiisNtt tt

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When in Southern California visit Universal City Studios
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IaflusalIdt
Dial
665-6290

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