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September 07, 1969 - Image 2

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rage i WE,

i HC Mlk-HICaRN UAILY

Sunday, September 7, 1969

ruge iWi., I I-iL MIC.HI(.jAN DAILY Sunday, September 7, 1969

1EDE R AL, STAT E ACTION:
Conservationist efforts focus
on Everglades, auto companies

By The Associated Press
The battle against the pollution
of air and natural resources had
two major developments last
week. It appeared that the federal
government would involve itself
in an effort to save the Everglades
National Park from destruction
and that the state of California
might pursue a battle against pol-
lution by negligence of the na-
tion's automakers.
The Nixon Administration has
decided to block cpnstruction of
a jetport in the Everglades on
grounds it would damage wild-
life, Gov. Claude Kirk's conser-
vation adviser said Thursday.
"The people in the U.S. Depart-
mlent of Interior looked at th3
Leopold report and went to Pres-
ident Nixon and told him, "We
just can't give on this one," Reed
said in an interview with the
Miami Herald.
Reed said the report by Interior
Department staff scientist Dr.
Luna Leopold concluded the air-
port would destroy Everglades Na-
tional Park, a vast storehouse of
tropical animal and plant life.
However, an Interior Undersec-
retary. Russell Train, and Sen.
Spessard Holland, (D-Fla.), both
said federal authorities have not
yet taken a stand on the proposed
airport.
Reed's comments followed a re-
port Thursday night by the Co-
lumbia Broadcasting System that
it had learned the airport s it e'
would be abandoned in deference
to conservationists.
In a broadcast on the CBS
Evening News with Walter Cron-
kite, the network said Gov. Kirk
was planning to meet with Trans-
portation Secretary John Volpe
and Interior Secretary W a l t e r
Hickel. CBS said Kirk would an-
nounce a new site for the air-
port next Thursday.
Meanwhile Los Angeles County
intervened Friday in a federal
suit against major automakers
over smog devices. asking $100
million in damages and, according
to one official, to insure the case
isn't settled out of public view.
A complaint petition to join
the suit brought Jan. 10 by U.S.
Atty. Matt Byrne was filed in U.S.
District Court. If Byrne accepts
the petition county representa-
tives will be able to examine wit-

ing to delay development a n d
installation of effective smog con-
trol devices. The suit, which asks
no damages, grew out of 1967 LosI
Angeles federal grand jury find-1
ings.
Court supervisor Kenneth Hahn
said the county intervened be-
cause "we do not want to see the
Department of Justice in Wash-
ington quietly make a deal with
automakers and settle this case
without fanfare."
He said the case must be brought
out at an open trial.
The supervisor said a decision
was made to enter the case after
supervisors received reports from

consumer watchdog Ralph Nad-
er and Rep. George Brown (D-
Los Angeles)t that Atty. General
John Mitchell was ready to settle
the suit out of court.
In its complaint, the county
asks $60 million for property dam-
age, alleging the auto manufac-
turers interfered with the county
air pollution control program by
not equipping them with ade-
quate ones.
It also asks $40 million to re-
imburse the county for treatment
of persons, primarily indigents,
"for respiratory diseases caused or
aggravated by air pollution from
motor vehicles."

Welfare mothers demand
increased clothing funds'

Scuba Diving Classes
A complete course in skin and scuba diving will be offered by the
Ann Arbor YM-YWCA starting Sept. 10, 1969. Those enrolled in
the course will receive 15 hours of theory, 15 hours of water in-
struction. (Most equipment furnished.) Upon successful comple-
tibn of class a scuba diver rating is issued.
Telephone 663-0536 for f urther in formatiwn
University o Michigan Bands
Varsity Night Show, 6
FLIP WILSON
and
SARAH VAUGHN and her trio
University Events Building
SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 27
8:30 p.m.
Send stamped, self-addressed envelope with request and payment to:

-Associated Press
1 i)oIl' bie'
The one on the left is Goofy. The one on the right is, of course,
Pluto. Bothl are !;lvt'n to entertaining the child in the foreground,
who doesn't seem iiiter'sted t}-at the man in the middle is Secre-
tary cf State Willion Jtor;ers. After all, what can he do?
.>:.Unit Su pervisors and Evening Service
Uni tSupervisors, 40hr. weeks on day-
1B U Eii 1N Irees Furniture Co.. Detroit: Seek-
ingA inteior designers, exper. prefer-
:... . ::.: red, degree fine.
SU NDAY, P S MBIRi Harper Hospital. Detroit. Mich.: Re-
idet Director for dormitory for nur-
r~ sing schlool, girls, live in, fuill time,
Day (I Mateis in G&C or related area of
dlue.. or less edue and exper.
Court of Common Pleas. Toledo,
OO'DA15P' I II:It 8Mich. ---Clinical Psychologist. PhD,I
____ro up therapy techniques.
Basic Firenianship Training Co(0 kseY.Cse-ManhattanBank . :-
Ill: Civil Defense Training Center, dustrial Psychologist, newly created
North Campus. 8:00 a-o. PhD in psych with 0-2 yeazrs.
General NjCe
Films for the "Basic Operation of ORGANIZAT ION
the IBA4029 Keypunch" wi be shown
September 10, 11. 12 and 15th ru" N(OT C E
19th with showings at 3. 4. 5. 7 and 8VS
p.mn. in the Semuinar Room of the
Computing Center. The above will be: :
hown on the hour along with the Art Print Loans: Sept. 9th. 3:00-5:00
film "Advanced Use of the 029 Key- pim.: Sept. 10th. 3-5:00 and 7-9:00 p.m.;
punch being shown on the half hour. Sept. 11th, 7-9:00 p.m.: Sept. 12th. 3-
The film 'Lusi Operation of the 5:00 p.m. in rooms 3516 and 3532,
MTS" will be showin on September Student Activities Building.
22nd thru 26th with showins at 3.
4, and 5 p.m. Tis will also be held '1h University of Michigan Bands an-
in the Seminar Rooni at the Co- notinice an opening for the position
puting Center. If you need further in- of Announeer with the 1969 Marching
formation. contact Miss Jacqueline Band. Hours: 4:00-6:00 p.m. Week-
Parker at the Comnputing Center, 764- days, and 9:00-11 :30, 12:30-5:00 Satur-
4143. drys. Any interested men with public
peaking experience may audition Sa-
,u} dray. Sept ember 6. 3:30 pi., at
Placemtent ierice
Career Planning: 764-6338. under- U of M You ng Americans for 1ree-
ctassilen planiing iajors, sr>. and >oim Meeting. September 10. 7:30 pm.
grad, students making career plans. i room 3h of the Union - Organliza-
Library of occup. info & counseling. ticnal meeting.
General Division: 764-7460. seniors
and grad. students. Interviewiigg. di- tach 'lob meeting, Thursday, Sept,
rectories. literature and job openings 11. 8:00 p.n.; 1236 Washtenaw (corn-
from government, non-profit, business er of S. Forest atid Washtenaw. near
and industrv. S. Univ.i. Speaker: Dr. David Craw-
Education Divission: 764-7462, sell- ford, "Bach and Handel - A General
ors and grad students. Placement in Comparison." Refreshments and fun af-
public, private, overseas: elem.: secon, terwvards. Everyone welcome! (Musical
college, univ. positions in teaching and knowledge unnecessary). For further
administration, information call 663-2827, 761-7356,
Summer Placement: 764-7460, Room 665-6806.
212, Lower Level. Underclassmen. ers..
grad, married, and foreign students.
Positions in camps, resorts parks, busi-
ness, govii't. nationwide and abroad.
GLE.RiAL DIVISION
Current Openings received by mailH
and phovne. not interviews onl cain-
pus, call 764-7460 for complete appli- W H A
cation details for there:
Iocal Medical Organization: Service

(Continued from Page 1)
Supervisor David Byrd said yes-
terday he did not know of any
available funds. "We had to go
on the ballot for a millage for
law enforcement and justice,"
Byrd pointed out.
And the state has so far been
silent as welfare mothers in
Wayne County have demonstrat-
ed for more Inoney for school
clothing, even though more than
100 mothers have been arrested
there and the Wayne County wel-
fare agency has been shut down.
What county welfare mothers
are asking for is not a set sum
but rather the right of each
mother to determine how much
money she will need.
Geormte Stewart, attorney for
WRC. has told the social services
board that a sample of clothing
applications representing 160 chil-
dren showed that an average of
$120.27 per child is needed.
WRC is also asking for recogni-
tion as the bargaining agent for
welfare recipients. The organiza-
tion represents around 200 mem-
bers of four local welfare groups
-- Humanizing Existing Welfare,
United Friendship, Ypsilanti Wel-
fare Action and Ypsilanti Welfare
Rights.
The county has so far consider-
ed the demand for recognition.
However, the social services board

was granted to 550 adult welfare
recipients. WRC a r g u e d that
many of the adults needed cloth-
ing so they could attend job train-
ing.
In addition, the payments will
be issued in the form of checks,
not vouchers as in the past. The
mothers objected to the vouch-
ers because, they said, many
stores require the customer to
spend the entire amount there or
refuse to cash the voucher. The
mothers said they were unable
to shop for bargains.
The Michigan Daily. edited and man-
aged by students at the University of
Michigan. News phone: 764-0552. Second
Class postage paid at Ann Arbor, Mich-
g.n, 420 Maynard St., Ann Arbor.
Michigan 48104. Published daily Tues-
day through Sunday norningUniversitv
year. Subscription rates: $9 by carrier,
810 by mail.
Summer Session published Tuesday
through Saturday morning. Subscrip-
tion rates: $2.50 by carrier, $3.00 by
mil ,1

3 K

i

I

THURSDAY
SEPT. 11
7:-30
League Ballroom
Soph Show '69
... Mass Meeting
"Half a Sixpence"

Mail Orders:
September 8-18
General Sales:
September 22-27

Varsity Night Show
2305 Student Activities Building
University of Michigan
Ann Arbor, Mich. 48104
Box Office
Student Activities Bldg.

nesses and add testimony. has answered two other demands
The suit accuses Ford, General from WRC. This year, a supple-
Motors and Chrysler of conspir- mental clothing allowance of $15
UNOW

PRICES: $2.50, $3.00, $3.50, $4.00

BLACK BROTHERS AND SISTERS
GET YOURSELVES TOGETHER
&IT}BI IBUIY OUSE

Try Daily Classifieds

r

I

BElT

September 9

1:00 P.M.

sponsored by Black Tutorial

_ _

NAME
CAMPUS ADDRESS
PHONE NUMBER
(Check those courses which are of interest to you, fill out
mail to Hillel Foundation, 1429 Hill St., Ann Arbor)

I

. IS THE
chestra!

a

a

CL d'4ZIW7

-an all-campus or

--sponsored by MUSKET and G&S!
--performing 3 hit shows!

DIAL 8-6416
"ONE OF THE BEST
PICTURES I'VE SEEN
THIS YEAR!"
-Brandon, GMf, the New Yorktr
"A PICTURE OF
DISTINCTION!"
-Satrday Review
"FASCINATING!"
-Time Magazine
A. LEE PLAIT sRS
A RAYMOND STROSS PRODUCTION .
STARRING
RITA
TUSHINGHAM
* ALSO *
"IMPORTANT!
POWERFUL!"
- . .sVY KE .. ,E
"CERTAINLY THE
MOST EXCITING
AND MEANINGFUL
-FILM IN YEARS!"
- LIFE MAGALIE
N EAnr. - mhs. -

I

DON'T MISS THE MASS MEETING
SEPT. 15, 8 P.M.,-ROOM 3A-UNION
UNIVERSITY THEATRE ORCHESTRA

"ns Change"
OR
The Baftle of Chicago
presented on the first anniversary of
the Chicago Police Riot. This response
to Mayor Daley's Telecast shows what
really happened last year in Chicago.
ALSO:
LAUREL and HARDY
"The Second Hundred Years"
KEYSTONE COPS
"Muddled in Mud"

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1. HEBREW FOR BEGINNERS: grammar and conversa-
tional Hebrew for people with no background in the
language. Mrs. Ilana Mueller, Wednesdays 7:30-9:00
p.m.
2. HEBREW FOR GRADUATES OF BEGINNER'S HEBREW
(and for people with some background inaHebrew com-
position and conversation). Mrs. Mueller and Mr. Alan
Krashny, Mondays 7:30-9:30 p.m.
3. READINGS AND CONVERSATION IN PROGRAMMATIC
THOUGHT IN HEBREW (AHAD HA'AM; HAIM ARLOZO-
ROFF; BEN-GURION AND URI AVNERI): Modern He-
brew for advanced and graduates of intermediate He-
brew (Winter 1969), Mr. Krashny and staff, Tuesdays
8:30-9:30 p.m.
4. BASIC JUDAISM-JEWISH ETHICS: an introduction to
the elements of Jewish moralty and rituals. Rabbi Ger-
ald Goldman, Tuesdays 6:30-8:00 p.m.
5.' READINGS IN THE OLD TESTAMENT: Reading in the
Bible with exegesis (Knowledge of Hebrew NOT man-
datory). Rabbi Mervin Tomsky, Wednesdays 7:30-9:00
p.m.
6. AN ADVANCED SEMINAR IN JEWISH HISTORY AND
SOCIAL EVOLUTION: PALESTINE 1936-1956. Mr.
Joseph Katan and staff, Thursdays 8:00-10:00 p.m.
(Recommended for majors in psychology and political
science.)

I

The instructors are UM Faculty and doctoral students who The Beit Midrash is operated in cooperation with the Detroit
* brina to the Beit Midrash both academic expertise and per- Hebrew teachers certificate. In others, students may obtain
sonal Jewish orientations notable for their depth and Midrasha, and some courses ore applicable there toward the
variety. UM credit.

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