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December 10, 1969 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1969-12-10

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.



Wolverines

emerge

as

leader

of

the

pack

By ERIC SIEGEL
The Michigan football team, which
meets Southern California in the R o s e
Bowl on New Year's Day, already has
what it wanted most this season-a
share of the Big Ten title and a first
class ticket to Pasadena.
A victory over the Trojans would be
the crowning glory to a season that saw
the Wolverines come back from a pair of
early season losses to go undefeated in
the second half of the year, and whip
previously unbeaten Ohio State, 24-12, on
the last day of the regular season.
The Wolverines ended all the talk about
the second-best team representing the
Big Ten in the Rose Bowl as they com-
pletely _outplayed the favored Buckeyes
before the largest crowd in college foot-
ball history and a national TV audience.
For a while, though, it looked -as
though the Wolverines wouldn't go to
Pasadena as conference co-champions or
anything else.
After winning three of their first four
games, the Wolverines vere dumped by
an unimpressive Spartan squad, 23-12,
in a game played at East Lansing.
The Spartans scored first in that game.
driving 80 yards in 12 plays, and the Wol-

verines never managed to recover. Schem-
bechler called his team's performance
"terrible" after the game, as they scored
their lowest point total of the season and
mrade numerous mental errors.
The loss to MSU was all the more
disappointing since Michigan had thrash-
ed highly-regarded Purdue 31-20 the
week before. The Wolverine defense was
instrumental in the victory, picking off
four interceptions from the hands of Mike
Phipps, the Boilermaker's Golden Boy,
and also pouncing on three Boilermaker
fumbles.
But the Maize and Blue's offense was
good in that game, too. Led by quarter-
back Don Moorhead and halfback Billy
Taylor, the Wolverines forged to a 24-14
halftime lead.
The victory over Purdue represented
quite a comeback for Michigan. T h e
week before, the Wolverines had dropped
a 40-17 decision to a tough Missouri
team.
The loss to the Tigers came after the
Wolverines had blasted Vanderbilt 42-14
and smashed Washington 45-7 to gain a
spot in the top twenty in both wire ser-
vice polls. The Wolverines' record was

thus a mediocre 3-2 over their first five
games.
There was nothing mediocre about the
Wolverines' record in the second half of
the season, however, as the Wolverines
went undefeated outscoring their oppon-
ents 212-34 over the five game stretch.
Michigan rekindled its Rose Bowl bid
with a 35-9 victory over Minnesota as
Taylor, making his first start of the
year, carried the ball for 151 yards and
scored-three touchdowns.
The Wolverines rolled down the Rose
Bowl trail by blasting Wisconsin, 35-7,
at home and then travelling to C h a m-
paign to cream the Fighting Illini 57-0.
Then Michigan faced one of its big-
gest tests of the year, as they met the
tough, albeit unpredictable, Hawkeyes in
Iowa City. The Wolverines passed their
test with flying colors, obliterating t h e
Hawks 51-6. In the process, the Wolver-
ines set Big Ten records for total yard-
age (673, rushing yardage (574), and
st downs (34).
Michigan's victory over Iowa virtually
assured the Wolverines of a trip to the
Rose Bowl. But the Wolverines didn't rest
on their laurels as they stunned O h i o
State in the final game ,of the season
to climax their regular season play.

-Daily-Thomas R. Copi
Wolverine ends Jim Mandich (88) and Billy Harris (80) do their thing

Agmmmp g, ".".I
MIA IN R l
NO MICHIGAN 4, PCL 0
I 2! rolitla

By CHRIS TERAS
If certain California people
had examined Michigan's bowl
record, they might never have
circulated that petition.
Before the end of the regu-
lar season, a group of Cali-
fornians drew up a petition pro-
testing the Big Ten policy that
prohibited the conference's best
team from appearing in the
Rose Bowl. Ostensibly this w a s
Ohio State, but their game in
Ann Arbor on November 22
changed the complexion of
things.
But even if Michigan h a d
gone as the second best team.
the petition was unjustified as
the Wolverines have had few
problems against West Coast
opposition in their four R o s e
Bowl appearances.
THE SCORES were the fol-
lowing: (1902) Michigan 49,
Stanford 0; (1948) Michigan
49, Southern Cal 0; (1951)
Michigan 14, California 7; and
(1965) Michigan 34, Oregon
State. 7
1902: Stanford
The 1902 Rose Bowl was the
first bowl game ever. The 1901
squad that participated in it
was coached by none other than
the immortal Fielding H. Yost,
in his freshman year as Mich-
igan's coach.
This was the famous "point-
a-minute" team that had out-
scored ten opponents by a total
of 501 to 0. Though the com-
petion may not have been as
stiff as it is today, (they beat
Buffalo 128-0 and ran up 1300
yards total offense), the play-
ers had to work a lot harder to
make a point a minute because
only five points were allotted for
a touchdown.
NOT SURPRISINGLY, Mich-
igan had to beat Ohio State on
the way to California. Yost was
quoted after this game as say-
ing, "The Ohio State game prov-
ed to be a hard one. We could
score but 21 points against
them, although there was no
doubt in the minds of all who
saw the game, that Michigan's
team was superior."
As good as this squad w a s,
however, a man named Casper
Whitney formulated a list which

erfect
put Harvard at the to follow-
ed by Yale and then Michigan.
He said then that, "Michigan
has a strong, heavy line and a
good backfield; but in handling
kicks, and in highly developed
team play, they are quite a bit
inferior to the eastern teams."
IN THE PROCESS of destroy-
ing Stanford, the Wolverines
ran 142 plays from scrimmage
and gained 1463 yards. All-
American Snow scored five
times.
1948: Southern Ca!
It was 46 years before Mich-
igan returned to Pasadent, even
though Michigan teams had re-
corder such successes as unde-
feated seasons in 1932 and 1933.
DURING THE 1947 c a in -
paign, the Wolverines were once
again undefeated although they
were scored upon at times, in
contrast to 1901. History re-
peated itself in more ways than
one as Michigan trounced the
Buckeyes by the identical 21-
0 margin on their way to the
Big Nine crown.
Southern Cal had swept the
Pacific Coast title that year
with a 6-0-0 conference mark
and a 7-1-1 record overall. Their
only loss was at the hands of
Notre Dame, 38-7.
Coach Fritz Crisler threw one
of the nation's most devastating
offenses at the Trojans, as the
Wolverines had run up 3 4 5
points in nine games.
Going ' against USC, Michi-
gan's offensive platoon aver-
aged only 183 pounds to the
Trojans 210 pounds.
Just as in 1902, however, the
Wolverines came away from
Pasadena with a 49-0 win. Num-
erous records were set or de-
stroyed in the process of blast-
ing Southern Cal.

in

bowl

history
Michigan came out and blew the
Bears off the field in the se-
cond half. Fullback Don Dufek
and quarterback Chuck Ort-
mann led the way with their
offensive show.

Roe ow uppleni
PAT ATKINS, Editor
THOMAS R. COPI, Photo Editor

1951: California
It required only three years
following the 1948 Rose Bowl,
for Michigan to build another
champion. A champion w h o
was allowed to make the trip
to Pasadena, that is.
For in 1948 the Wolverines
were 6-0-0, but the no-repeat
rule permitted second-p 1 a c e
Northwestern, 5-1, to go. In
1949, Michigan was 4-1-1 and
co-champions with Ohio State.
The team lost to Northwestern,
21-20, and tied the Buckeyes,
who were subsequently desig-
nated as the Big Ten's Rose
Bowl representative because
Michigan had gone last.
THE 1950 campaign started
disasterously, but ended in Cali-
fornia. For the first time since
1937, and for the seventh time
since 1898, MSC (now known
as MSU) downed the Wolver-
ines. The score was 14-7.
Michigan suffered two more
losses, 27-6 to Army and 7-0
to Illinois, and a tie, 7-7 w it h
Minnesota, before clashing with
Ohio State for the champion-
ship.
The game came to be known
as the "Snow Bowl" because the
worst blizzard in Ohio's his-
tory had struck the night be-
fore and was still raging during
the contest.
The teams traded a total of
45 punts, but it was the punts
that the Buckeyes didn't g e t

off that proved fatal to the
biome team.
In the first quarter, Michi-
gan blocked a Buckeye p u n t
which rolled out of the end zone
for a safety. With 47 seconds
left to play in the first half,
linebacked Tony Momsen crash-
ed the OSU line, blocked a punt,
and fell on the ball in the end
zone for the wining 9-3 margin.
ILLINOIS would have gone to
California had it not been up-
set by Northwestrn, 14-7, but
the Wolverines finished alone
on top. and were invited to play
California on New Year's Day.
The Golden Bears had won
their third straight Pacific
Coast Conference title. It was
also their third straight attempt
at beating the Big Ten in the
Rose Bowl. In fact, the Big Ten
representative had not b e e n
beaten since the contract with
the Pacific Coast went into ef-
feet in January, 1947.
California's success lay in a
crunching rushing attack. This
was good enough to send the
Bears into the game undefeated
for a third straight time.
The Wolverines got off to a
terrible first half. They tallied
only two first downs as com-
pared with California's 10.
Michigan ran only 11 offensive
plays, and were in possession of
the ball for but five of the 30
minutes.
Just to prove that it doesn't
happen only in the movies,

ORTMANN FIRED 13 com-
pletions in the second half for
a game total of 146 yards, with
141 recorded after halftime.
Dufek was just as good. On 23
carries, he gained 123 yards,
and also scored both Michigan
touchdowns.
1965: Oregon State
In 1964 the Michigan squad
was supposed to be good, but
nobody expected them to be as
good as they were. The Wol-
veriens won eight of their first
nine games, including a 17-10
victory at East Lansing. The
only defeat was a 21-20 set-
back against Purdue as quarter-
back Bob Timberlake was stop-
ped inches short of a two-point
conversion.
THUS, MICHIGAN took a 5-1
conference record down to Co-
lumbus where the Buckeyes
awaited them with a 6-0 mark.
They scored the game's only
touchdown with less than a
minute to play in the first half.
Following a fumbled punt re-
covery, Timberlake hit Jim Det-
wiler with a pass at the two,
and the big halfback carried two
Buckeyes with him into the
end zone. After the conversion,
the halftime score was 7-0.
In the second half, Michigan's
defense was again non-yielding
and Ohio State was shut out.
The final 10-0 margin was set
up when do-it-all Timberlake
kicked a 17-yard field goal in
the opening minutes of the
fourth quarter.
See MICHIGAN, Page 3

THE ROSTERS

-Daily-Thomas R. Copi
WOLVERINE OFFENSIVE AND DEFENSIVE platoons show the teamwork which put them into the
Rose Bowl. Above, defenders Henry Hill (39), Pete Newell (82), and Cecil Pryor (55) come to the aid
of linebacker Ed Moore in chasing down Rex Kern. Garvie Craw (48) and Don Moorhead
(27) pave the way for teammate Billy Taylor.

,i

THE CARDIAC KIDS:
Uiid ef eated season tig ht squeeze for USC

By PHIL HERTZ
The word around sports circles
for years has been that the true
test of a team is its ability to
battle back from behind and gain
victory.
If this assessnwnt is accurate
then Southern Cal truly has one
of the great football teams of all
time. Indicative of the kind of
season the Trojans have had were
games against UCLA and Stanford.
The Cardiac Kids. as one sports-
writer nicknamed them, kicked a
field goal with three seconds left
to top Stanford, 26-24, and scored
a touchdown in the closing min-
utes to top the Bruins, 14-12.
USC compiled a 9-0-1 record.
with a tie against the Irish of
Notre Dame marring their record,
but only in two games did the

tent. offense at times this season
with the attack keyed by quarter-
back Jimmy Jones and tailback
Clarence Davis. Jones, a six-foot-
one sophomore from Harrisburg,
Pennsylvania, was fifth in the
Pacific-8 in total offense and pass-
ing, but he failed to live up to his
advance billing as an All-Amer-
ican. He completed only forty per
cent of his passes and netted only
CG yards rushing in 85 attempts
due mainly to losses in rushing of
250 yards.
Davis, the successor to O. J.
Simpson in the Southern Califor-
nia backfield, was the leading
rusher in the Pac-8 with 1275
yards, a figure which put him high
in the national rushing standings.
Sharinug the rushing duties with
Davis are juniors Charlie Evans

posts are six-foot four, 245-pound
sophomore John Vella and veteran
six-foot four, 254 pound senior
Sid Smith. Senior Fred Khasigian
and junior Wayne Yary are theI
guards while the starting center is
senior Bill Redding.
One final key to the USC of-
fensive machine has been the
kicking of junior Ron Ayala. Ayala
booted five of eight field goal at-
tempts and hit on 26 of 29 at-
tempts.
Much of the success of South-
ern Cal has been due to their de--
fense. The Trojans had the top
defense in the Pacific-8 and gaver
up the fewest yards rushing in the
conference. Spearheading the .de-
fense has been the line, which has
been Riven the nickn me "The
Wild Bunch."

No.
60
99
28
23
76
56
94
36
48
25
35
72
22"
21
37
31
18
92
14
75
81
71
80
24
44
39
70
89
86
90
57
88
78
65
97

MICHIGAN
Player Pos.
*Baumgartner, Robert OG
Beckman, Thomas DT
Berutti, William QB
*Betts, James OB
Brandstatter, James OT
*Caldarazzo, Richard. OG
Carpenter, Alden DE
Coin, Dana K-DE
*Craw, Garvie FB
**Curtis, Thomas S
Darden, Thomas Wolf
*Dierdorf, Daniel OT
Doughty, Glenn TB
Elliott, Bruce DB
*Federico, Eric FB
"Francis, Alan MG
Gabler, John WB
Grambau, Frederick DT
Gusich, Frank Wolf
*Hall, Werner OT
a "Hankwitz, Michael TE
*Harpring, Jack OT
*Harris, William SE
"Healy, Brian DB
Henry, Preston TB
"Hill, Henry MG
*Huff, Ralph LB
Huiskens, Thomas TE
*Imsland, Jerry SE
Keller, Michael DE
"Killian, Timothy K-C
^Mandich, James TE
McCoy, Richard DT
McKenzie, Reginald OG
Moore, Edward LB

1't.
215
230
194
185
235
215
210
213
218
188
186
243
195
172
200
195
203
227
187
219
203
218
189
167
185
224
228
200
203
205
215
217
240
236
210

hit. Class
6-0 Sr.
6-7 So.
6-2 Jr.
6-3 Jr.
6-3 So.
5-11 Sr.
6-2 So.
6-2 So.
6-2 Sr.
6-1 Sr.
6-1!' So.
6-4 Jr.
6-2 So.
6-0 So.
5-11 Sr.
5-10 Sr.
6-2 Sr.
6-4 So.
6-0 So.
6-0 Jr.
6-1 Sr.
6-4 Jr.
6-1 Jr.
6-1 Sr.
6-0 So.
5-11 Jr.
6-2 Jr.
6-2 So.
6-2 Sr.
6-3 So.
6-4 Jr.
6-3 Sr.
6-4 Jr.
6-3 So.
6-1 Jr.

No.
6
8
10
11
12
14
15
16
17
18
19
21
23
25
28
29
33
34
39
43
46
50
51
53
54
56
58
59
60
64
68
70
71
72

SOUTHERN
Player
Jim Fassel
Jimmy Jones
Bob Chandler
Bill Jenkins
Gary Orcutt
Walt Failor
John Young
Sandy Durko
Ron Ayala
Sam Dickerson
Terry DeKraai
Bruce Dyer
Mike Berry
Bob Giorgetti
Clarence Davis
Lou Harris
Charlie Evans
Tom Fitzpatrick
Humphrey Covington
Tyrone Hudson
Gerry Shaw
Mike Haluchak
Bob Jensen
Greg Slough
Cliff Culbreath
Bill Redding
Bob Stirling
Rich Oberreuter
Wayne Yary
Fred Khasigian
Steve Lehmer
Gary McArthur
Willard cott
Al Cowlings

CALIFORNIA
Pos. Wt.
QB 199
QB 190
RB 180
DIIB 172
LE 185
ROV 199
DHB 186
DHB 176
DHB-K 180
LE 194
LE 185
LE 172
LH 199
RH 170
LH 194
hB 194
FB 215
FB 207
FB 196
DHB 177
ROV 189
LB 209
LB 215
LB. 237
LB 218
C 217
RG 228
C 230
RG 219
LG 223
RG 238
DT 234
MG 237
DT 249

Ht.
6-2
6-1
6-1
6-3
6-1
6-2
6-2
6-1
5--9
6-2
5-11
6-0
5-10
6-9
5--11
5-10
6-1
6-0
6-0
6-0
6-0
5-11
6-0
6-3
6-3
6--1
6-2
6-1
6--1
5-11
6-2
6-5
6--1
6--5

Class
Jr.
So.
Sr.
Jr.
Sr.
Jr.
Jr.
Sr.
Jr.
Jr.
Sr.
So.
Jr.
So.
Jr.
So.
Jr.
So.
Sr.
Jr.
Sr.
Jr.
Sr.
Jr.
So.
Sr.
So.
Jr.
Jr.
Sr.
Sr.
Sr.
Sr.
Sr.

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