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September 05, 1969 - Image 5

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Friday, September S, 1969

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Five

Friday, September 5, 1969 THE MICHIGAN DAILY Page Five

No tranquility in TM, club sports forays

Daily-Peter Dreyfuss

Rugger speeds toward goal after serum

MUCH TALENT REMAINS
Frosh grtidders lose prospect

By CHRIS TERAS
Of what practical use is a guid-
ing philosophy for daily living that
declares "No one is to enjoy a
moment's peace?" Around Michi-
gan's intramural and recreational
sports facilities, it serves to keep
things jumping-as well as bounc-
ing, jouncing, trouncing, bashing,
crashing, splashing, and goring,
but certainly not boring.
Entering its 58th year of exist-
ence, the intramural and recre-
ational sports program separates
into two programs. One is the IM
program itself, run by the staff
located in the IM Building. The
other division is club sports. These
groups are somewhat autonomous,
but club sports members cooperate
closely with the IM staff.
For IM sports, the staff has or-E
ganied competition into ten divi-
sions: Faculty, Residence Halls,
Graduate, Independent, Fraternity
'Social), All campus, Co-recre-
ational, International C e n t e r,
North Campus Married Housing,
and Special Events.
Because a given division offers
only a portion of the complete list
of possible activities, interested
persons should call the IM Sports
Building at 663-4181 for any in-
formation concerning where, be it
IM or club sports, they might fit
into the process of sacrificing a
few peaceful moments.
Most IM activity involves team
competitions, but an attempt is
made by officials to provide forl
informal use. Team sports will
soon be organied, but entries are'
already being accepted for softball,
golf and tennis.
To handle these activities as well
winter, the IM administration of-
fers the usual facilities in addition
to some new ones.
Presently, the IM Sports Build-
ing, the Ice Rink, Waterman Gym,
South Ferry Field, Wines Field,
j North Campus Murfin Field, the

golf course and various sca
playing areas ranging froi
ROTC rifle range to bowling
are used for the activities.
construction is Fuller Field
North Campus, and expandE
will be made this season of
Field House.
In addition, the Sports Bu
will be open Monday throug
day 8:00 a.m. to 10:0 p.m.,E
days 8:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m.
the Sunday hours still be+
mined.

attered undefeated in Big Ten competi-
m the tion.
alleys Rugby has added something new
Under to home competition. Games will
d near be played on the new Tartan Turf
ed use surface presently nearing comple-
f Yost tion on Ferry Field. The Missouri'
game will take place inMichigan
wilding Stadium followving the regular
h Fri- football clash.
Satur- Practices have already begun
with with players drawn from all ele-
deter- ments of the University commu-
nity, but new and inexperienced

Sept
Oct.
Oct.
Oct.
Oct.

By DAVE 1IANNES
There have been rumblings of discontent this
past week on campus over the signing of Jim
Essian by the Philadelphia Phillies of the Na-
tional League. Essian was a high school star in
football, basketball, and baseball at Detroit St.
Martin's. The 6-2, 210 pounder was described
by head football coach Bo Schembechler as
"the outstanding prospect at running back in
Michigan prep football." Essian had signed a
letter of intent with the Wolverines.
However, the Michigan freshman squad still
boasts many fine players, possibly the most tal-
ented group since Jack Clancy, Rick Sygar,
and Bill Yearby played together a few years
back.
Surprisingly, only four states are represented
on the team. There are eight athletes f r o in
Michigan, 11 from Ohio, six from Illinois, and
one from Indiana.
The Frosh squad appears especially strong at
the quarterback spot with five recruits. They are
John Pighee, a 6-3, 190 pounder from Cleve-
land, Bob Swan, 6-2 and 210 pounds from De-
troit Redford, Jack McBride, 6-4, 185 pounds
from Chicago, Larry Cipa, 6-4, 195 pounds from
Cincinnati, and John Daniels. a 6-4. 192 pound-
er from Newark, Ohio.
Coach Louis Lee admitted that lie signed very
few players that played only defense in their
high school careers. Most of the freshmen who
are to be defensive specialists will be switched
from offense.
At fullback there are Bob Mogulish f r o in
Youngstown, Ohio, Greg Ellis from Connorsville,
Indiana, and Tom Kee from Wheaton, Illinois.
All three of these players have outstanding
high school credentials and are counted on
heavily by Lee,
Other halfbacks who will be on this year's
freshmen team are Randy Logan of Detroit
Northern, Nick Cashion of Villa Park, Illinois,

Alan Walker of Cincinnati. and Dave "Bo"
Rather of Sandusky, Ohio.
Coach Lee expects one or two men on tenders
in other sports to try out for the team in addi-
tion to the usual 30 or 35, walk-ons. "We've only
got 26 boys now which is hardly a team," states
Lee. "All we ask of a walk-on is that he have
high school experience in football, be in good
physical shape, and have a desire to play."
In discussing the shape of his present team Lee
says that they have recovered from their high
school injuries and are in fine over-all condition.
"A few are overweight but we'll take care of
that," Lee promises.
This year's schedule consists of a home game
with Michigan State on October 25 and an away
encounter with Notre. Dame on November 15.
Coach Lee is looking forward to the games since
they will be a good test of his players. "With only
two months practice under their belts none of the
teams will be very well coordinated but we hope
to beat them with our personnel," he says.
"This is definitely a much better schedule than
we've had the last few years," claims Lee. "Before
we played Bowling Green and Toledo. As far as
Bowling Green goes we might as well have played
an intrasquad game. Toledo gave us a fine game
since that was our first game and their fifth.
However, playing the bigger schools will be much
more beneficial for us."
Coach Lee is a former Michigan footballer him-
self and a three year letterman as a defensive
back. At the age of 24 Lee is just 16 hours short
of his law degree. This term he plans to go to
school part-time and carry six hours.
A high school All-Stater at Abington High
School in Pennsylvania, Lee was a graduate as-
sistant the last two seasons as the freshmen de-
fensive coach before Michigan Head Coach Bo
Schembechler, gave him the reigns to the fresh-
men team.

RUGBY
Sept. 13 Pittsburgh RFC
Sept. 20 WINDSOR

Scledules

. 27 UNIV. OF TORONTO
4 UNIV. OF MISSOURI
11 NORTHERN ILLINOIS
18 Michigan State
25 Milwaukee RFC
Denison College

Anyone not satisfied by forfeit- ruggers are welcome to a general Nov. 1 CHICAGO LIONS
ure of his peaceful moments to IM meeting 7:00 p.m. Monday, Sep- Nov. 8 Illinois
'activities may wish to try one of tember 8th at Ferry Field. In case
the Club Sports. The competition of rain, Yost Field House will hold Though it has not caught on in
is keener at this level son the gathering. America as in other nations, Mich-
ichien clubs plae as some Rugby is an offshoot of soccer igan's contingent of soccer buffs1
whichioccasionally have varsit and football. The ball is somewhat did generate some measure of in-
stat us s y larger than a football but it may terest last year as they posted a!
T enanot be thrown forward. Like soc- 7-1-1 record. In the process, they
The best known club' are la- cer, players are allowed only to shutout six opponents. Perhaps
crosse, rugby, and soccei, kick the ball towards the goal. such feats will help the club's;
Lacrosse is the game appro- Scoring is similar to the football campaign for future varsity
priated from certain American In- touchdown and field goal. status,
dian tribes. Though it is much Soccer fans however, may claim In preparation for the upcoming
more popular in the East, Mid- something over football, rugby's soccer season, a general meeting
western rugby participants are no Tartan Turf, and lacrosse's op- will take place at 7:30 Wednesday
less enthusiastic in this "most portunity to release aggressions. night, Septenber 10, in room 3529
grueling of sports." A participant The sport's proponents hail it as Student Activities Building. Team
should be well-prepared to be the world's most popular sport. organizers say graduate students!
rudely bounced, jounced, trounced,
bashed, crashed, and especially to
be gored by the webbed stick only I
sometimes used for carrying or
passing the ball.
Despite the rough contact,
enough people enjoy this pastime
for the Michigan team to play an A t i t 0 1 G a u t
informal fall schedule, inculding
Notre Dame away and Michigan Graduate Assembly represents you
State at home. For the regular /
spring season, there is presently ! concern to graduate stu
a fall schedule of seveni games.grd ae SU
Rugby is another not so peaceful HOUSING (on and off campus) STUDENT
sport that nevertheless boasts
widespread student participation. TEACHING FELLOWS IN DEPA
The Rugby Club, which claims the
largest membership of any sports ORGANIZATION UNIVE
club on campus, offers an op-
portunity to play on a number of PARKING PROBLEMS STU
levels according to ability. Last AND MANY OTHER AREAS
season, the Michigan ruggers were
Be sure your department is fully represented. For information
department chairman or Howard Brilliant (Ext. 44321
iiiirn CAI 1CGraduate Assembly appoints students to many University an

sl
.i
i
,ri

Students
u on matters of
Dents
T PARTICIPATION
kRTMENTAL AND
RSITY AFFAIRS
JDENT FEES
about this, contact your
d GA committees. If you

Nov. 15 Notre Dame
Nov. 25 0I10 STATE
SOCCER
Sept. 13 NORTHERN ILLINOIS
Sept. 27 Oakland Univ.
Oct. 5 Waterloo Univ.
Oct 11 KENTUCKY
Oct. 18 Cleveland State
Oct. 25 Toledo
Nov. 1 TOLEDO
Nov. 8 Wright State
are particularly encouraged to at-
tend. Hopefully, players with of-
fensive potential will be attracted
to complement the already tough
defense.
Besides soccer, lacrosse, and rug-
by, there are 20 other club sports
in which one may seek various
levels of tranquility. These are
archery, boxing, cricket, faculty
indoor squash, faculty indoor ten-
nis, fencing,; handball, judo, kar-
ate, paddleball, power lifting, rifle,
rowing, sailing, Scuba, skiing, Tae
Kwon Do, tennis, volleyball, and
water polo.

IIIAI A MIC CII1

FRIDAY-1 P.M.-9 P.M.
SATURDAY-9 A.M.-2 P.M.
Furniture, Appliances,
Bicycles, Books,
Hardware, Dishes.
KIWANIS ACTIVITY CENTER
Washington and 1 st Streets
665-0450

are interested in serving, contact your representative or any Graduate Assembly
officer.
The first meeting of the Fall term will be on
Wed., Sept. 10 at 7:30 on the Fourth floor, Rackham
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