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December 02, 1969 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1969-12-02

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Tuesday, December 2, 1969

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Seven

.............. 7 l _... _ , .. _ F
t

$75-$ 100 INCREASE:

Panel to

THE LOTTERY

SOUTH U. INCIDENT:
Former U' student cleared

(Continued fromi Page 1)

JUNG 1
12 ... 272
13... 69
14...... 356
15 ......180
16 .. .274
17...... 73
18......341
19......104
20......360
21.....60
22 . ... 247
23...109
24...... 358
25.137
26.. 22
27.. 64
28...222
29...353
30.. 09
4 CLV
1. 93
2 ...350
3..115
4..279
5. 188
6......3 27
........50
8. .... 13
9.....77
10 ...,..284
11...248
12.....15
13...... 42
14...331
15 .... 322
16.....20
17.....98
18...190
19.....27
20...187
21.....27
22...153
23...172
24.. 23
25.....67
26...303
27...289
28 . .. 88
29......270)
30..287
31..193
A1UG UST
1..111
2. 45
3..261
4..145
5....,, 54
6 .. ..114
7..... 168
8..48
9..106

10..21
11.324
12..142
13..307
14..198
15 ...102
16 .44
17. 154
18..141
19. 11
20..344
21..291
2 ..... 339
23..116
24... .. 6
25 . ... 286
26 . ... 245
27 ...352
28. 167
29..61
30. 333
31..11
SEPTEMBER
1. 225
2..161
3 .49
4 .... 232
5. 82
6 ... 6
8
8..184
9 .... 263
10. 71
11 ...158
12..242
13. 175
14 1
15. 113
16-..207
17..255
18 .... 246
19. 177
20..63
21. 04
22.160
23.119
4..195
25 ...149
26..18
27 .... 233
28. 257
29 .... 151
30 .... 315
OCTlOBlER
1..359
2...25
3. 244
4 .... 202
5. 24
6 .... 87
7 ... 234
8 .....283

9..342
10.. 20
11.237
12. 72
13. 138
14.294
15 ... 171
16..254
17..288
18 . . 5
19..241
20..192
21..243
22..117
23..201
24 ... 196
25.176
26......7
27.264
28 .94
29 ...229
30..38
31..79
NOVEMiBER
1...... 19
2.34
3..48
4..266
5 .. . 10
6..76
7..51
8..97
9..80
10..282
11..46
12..66
13 ... 126
14.127
15..131
16..107
17..143
18 ... 146
19.203

20. .185
21. 156
22...... 9
23......182
24..230
25.....132
26. 309
27..47
28.281
29..... 99
30.....174
DJECEMBER
1..129
2..328
3..157
4. 165
5..56
6..10
7..1'2
8..105
9..43
10.-41
11...... 39
12..314
13......163
14..26
15.320
16..96
17..304
18..128
19..240
20..135
21..70
22. 53
23..162
24..95
25..84
26..173
27..78
28..123
29..16
30...... 3
31..100
between two or
the same draft

Ask dorm hike today discuss

Some indisonBy ROB BIERroinCitingtoriot'char e
the order of business for the Residence Hall Rate Committee at their CO-ed halls

4 p.m. meeting this afternoon in the SAB.

While final determination is y
crease is not expected to exceed $10
The estimate, made by comm
sents inflation, increased services, a
total increases could amount to
employed to help reduce that figure
One such reduction could be the
ing fund to the University general
education-oriented such as library
grams, and staff oriented, such as s
Another reduction could result
breakfasts, which won approval in
tion of $57 was placed on that ite
the figure included the elimina-,
tion of continental breakfast as

yet to be made, the proposed in-

By JUDY KAHN

If a tie exists
more persons in

board when that draft board
reaches the last birthday it needs
to fill its quota, selection will be
as1ed on the first letter of the last
naie as followvs:

...J
2...0
3... ..D
4..N.
.......N
6- 0
9. ...Zw
10. P
11 Q
12.....Y
13..U

14........C
15.......
16..I
17..K
18......H
19......
20..L
21. M
22.-
23. R
25.
26..V

well.I
"A more realistic estimation for
eliminating the regular breakfast
would be only $30," Myers said.
Final figures should be forth-
coming, according to committee
member Barry Blauer, '71. "We've
been discussing the various issues
pretty heavily and now we have
to make someddecisions on them,
before the end of the term," he
said.
A referendum on the proposed:
increases, suggested by Tenants'
Union representative Peter Dent-
on, may delay a final decision. The
rate committee, which is made up
of five students and one housing
representative, appears evenly di-
vided on the question of a refer-
endum.
Student Government Council
President Marty McLaughlin
pointed out, "It depends on what
th3 committee wants to do.
There's not much question about
the cost-of-living increase, but if
they want to add some services
which weren't favored in the sur-
vey, then they should ask the stu-
dents' opinion."
Once the Rate Committee reach-
es a decision, its proposal will go
to the Regents for final action.
"We hope to have our recom-
mendations to the Regents at
their February meeting," said
committee member Tom Jones,
Grad.

r
i
E

0, and may be as low as $75. A decision to recommend the
ittee member Jack Myers, repre- conversion of four residence halls
nd changes in funding. While the to co-educational housing may be
$130, various reductions may be reached today by the Fall 1970
Planning Committee of the Office
transfer of costs from the operat- of University Housing.
fund. The operations included are The proposal affects Oxford
acquisitions and faculty meal pro- Housing, Couzens and Stockwell
which are presently womens'
tflar es and security measures. dorms and West Quad which
fro th elmintio ofreglarhouses men.
a residence hall survey. A reduc- A final decision on these con-
r, but it was later discovered that versions will be made by the Board
of Governors of the Residence
jj. get Halls later this year.
F e*snm en Figures for next year project
about 600 excess spaces for women
,. in the dormitory system. A mini-
mm of 412 extra spaces for men
dorn ch icare needed, but even this will re-
quire the rejection of more males
IContinued from Page 1) than female students from the
dents or foreign students will also residence system. Five hundred
be given preference. thirty spaces are needed for males
Henry Malin, program co-or- to accommodate men and women
dinator for the International in equal proportions.
Center believes it is "about time Pete Jensen, a member of the
that the University started giving Planning Committee and a resi-
priority to students who have not dent of West Quad, said yesterday
been previously climatized to Ann that if 600 spaces are converted in
Arbor, the women's dorms, West Quad
He adds, "The hundred foreign can be made co-ed.
students living in Markley din- According to partial returns
ing room might have had a lot to from a survey circulated in West
do with the decision" to include Quad, 93 per cent of those who
them on the priority list. Housing returned their questionnaires are
had not been planned for the stu- in favor of some kind of co-educa-
dents this fall. tiona living. These statistics are
After priority students approxi- based on returns from four of
mately 2,000 spaces will be open West Quad's six houses.
in the dorm system for which Results from a survey being run
about 2,600 students normally ap- at Stockwell could not be obtained
a 6nl last night.
ply. +A+ i f^AW^V"

$10,000. The new code also includes a
The jury heard testimony from precise definition of the periods
Deputy Police Chief Harold Olson during which buildings must be

By CARLA RAPOPORT center for juvenile delinquents Tapert and Long placed Dover
A 12-man jury acquitted last where he was employed. on the opposite side of the street
Wednesday former University stu- Also testifying for the defense from where the prosecution con-
dent Michael Dover on a felony were Thomas Long, '70, Andrew tended the objects were thrown.
charge stemming from last sum- Barbas, 70, and Donald Tapert, After deliberating for four
mer's disturbances on South Uni- 71. Barbas testified that the per- hours, tie jury asked to re-hear
versity St. son who threw the objects wasI Ketchumn's testimony. Ten min-
similar in appearance to, but was utes later they delivered the "not-
Dover was charged with hurling not, Dover. guilty" verdict.
objects at police and inciting to
riot.
The three day trial, with CircuitIN e1 hgeed
Cout JudgeWilliam ger l jNwiisho sntc d a
siding was among the first t
temepts to proscute under the "
state anti-riot statute adopted In erease tenantprotection
following the Detroit riots in July,
1967. Maximum penalty is 10 years
imprisonment and/or a fine of (Continued from Page 1) siders the illegality of the strike

and Patrolman Theodore Ketchum
of the Ann Arbor Police that,
Dover, on two occasions, ran out
in front of the crowd and hurled1
two unidentifiable objects towards
police lines on East University St.
Dover told the jury he could not
have thrown anything, because he
had just been released from Uni-
versity Hospital. He said he had
undergone a weeklong treatment
for a stab wound received while ,
breaking up a fight at the Vine-j
yard, a residential care treatment

inspected. The time between in-
spection of apartments would be
at most two years. Five years will,
be allowed 'for single and two-}
family dwellings.
The escrow provision, according,
to members of the Tenants Union
steering committee, would weaken
an argument used by the laid-
lords' attorney, William Barense,
in a conspiracy suit filed by theI
landlords against the union this
summer.
To demonstrate what he con-

as a fundamental attack on pri-
vate property, Barunse has con-
tended that rents withheld can
only be paid into a city-establish-
ed escrow account and not into a
private fund of the type the Ten-
ants Union currently uses.
Barense bases his argument on
a state housing law, which, he
claims, permits rent payments
only into a city-operated account
when withheld from a landlord.
He believes his case would be
unaffected by the proposed code
because "the city cannot pass leg-
islation contrary to the state" of
which it is a part.

;I

t
1

I i _

PRE-ROSE BOWL
SHOE SALE

Cavanaugh accepts
r(U' lecture position

Since most of the space is re-
quired for men approximately 300
slots in women's dorms will have
to be converted to men's rooms,
Myers says.
Next year's freshman class will
have until May 1 to claim the
space being tentatively reserved
for them. 'Ahose accepted after
May 1 will have two weeks toI
claim their residence hall space.I

Students in 'xord rdHousing
have petitioned the planning com-
mittee to convert 130 spaces there.
The planning committee meeting
will take place today at 4 p.m. on
the third floor of the Student
Activities Bldg.

I

By TIM BRANDYBERRY
Detroit Mayor Jerome P. Cava-
naugh1 has agreed to deliver a
series of lectures on urban prob-
lems at the University next se-
mester, William Haber, Special
Assistant to the President, said
yesterday. Cavanaugh had been
previously approached by several
departments.
Haber said the arrangement is
still tentative. "Discussions with
Mayor Cavanaugh are still in the
informal stage," he said. "No con-
clusions have been reached. No
recommendations have as yet been
made to the Regents."
If an arrangement can be work-
ed out, Cavanaugh, who will be
leaving the mayor's post this
January, will deliver 8 to 10 lec-
tures "hopefully in the winter term
or else in the fall of next year,"
said Haber. The schools of Natural
Resources, Architecture and Design
and Engineering are among those
requesting Cavanaugh's services.
It was also announced that Ber-
nard Klein, City Controller of De-
troit and former University liaison
with the state legislature, would
come to the University as a visit-
ing lecturer for the winter term.
Cavanaugh, if he accepts the
post, will be officially teaching in
the Institute for Public Policy Stu-

dies (IPPS), a two-year program
offering a masters degree.
Haber commented that "from
the University's point of view,
having Mayor Cavanaugh teach
here would be highly desirable."
He said that the departments are
"very enthusiastic" about the pos-
sibility of obtaining Cavanaugh's
services.
"It will be an enriching experi-
ence for University students to
have advantage of the experience
of a man who was chief executive
of one of the most difficult urban
areas in the country," he added.
"Mayor Cavanaugh, from his long
association with urban problems,
can bring a high degree of sen-
sitivity and expertiseto his post
as lecturer in urban affairs,"
Huber said.
The institute formed two years
ago from the defunct Institute of
Public Administration.

t
E
t'
,,
)'
;
T ',,
r
y,
r ',
F?
L

IE
T1"V RENTALS
10 per month
FREE Service and Delivery
---NO DEPOSIT REQUIRED---
CALL:'
Nejac TV Reintals
662-5671
SERVING BIG 10SCHOOLS SINCE 1961

wrr-rarCOUPON-rmm. in
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Mon., Tues., Wed.,
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ONLY
14.90
and 10.90

0

Sbicco
Bandolino

* Realites
* Italian and
" Spanish Imports

1210 S. University-769-2088

_ _ _ _ _ __ . _ _ _

a

'A

p-o by "" . f lw.
c7anyhave moved.
but the 'Pa u.is
8tayOn..

Z4 4
D (* i-
r '
1 a
till
our all-new poncho for
Miss J is fringed crochet,.
this su.per south-of-the-border
look goes softand
see-through in Acrylar1'
acrylc with a fling of
fringe. Eggplant,
ecru or black in one size.
16.00
MlsJi n e r~e***

We encourage job-hopping.
We do try to keep it
intramural-within
Du Pont that is-and we
do have a more formal
title for it,
"planned mobility."
j Saylor Gilbert, CH.E.,
V.P.I., 1962,
tells it like it is.
Take a goodlook around you,
and you'll see people at Du Pont
who've had a lot of movement
through very different kinds
of jobs. There's no doubtthat
this diverse experience helps you.
For example, I had four
assignments concerned with
different aspects of polymerizing,
casting, stretching and finishing
our polyester film base."
0 0 00 s o n- - - o

I
It only means we don't
put you in a training
program. We put you in
growth jobs-to help you
get to the top.of your
field the way you want
to get there.

The Paulists arrived on the
West -Side of New York City
in 1858. In 1895 they moved
into San Francisco's China-
town and into the fringes of
Chicago's Loop in 1904.
They're stilt there.
Times change. Neighborhoods
change. Sometimes they go up.
Sometimes they go down -
but through it all the Paulist
stays. As long as there are
people to be served the Paulist
will be there.
The Paulist may be in the
same old place but he con-
stantly does new things. That's
one of the characteristics of
the Paulist order: using their
own individual talents in new
ways to meet the needs of a
fast-changing world in the col-
leges... in communications.. .
in the ghettos.

C --

"Having had all this, lfeel
I was better prepared for my
present position of training
supervisor. But aside from the.
fact that variety can help you,
I believe most people just like
a change after working at one ,
job for a period of time." 4

.

4*.

0 000Your Du Pont recruiter
will be a guy like Saylor..
00 Ask him about planned
mobility-or anything else

yo
- Du
u Pont Company 4co
#' Room 6687 + to
.' Wilmington, DE 19898
Please send me the booklets checked below.
/r JChemical Engineers at Du Pont
Q Mechanical Engineers at Du Pont
flEngineers at Du Pont
! QAccounting, Data Systems, Marketing, Production
rI Name
I' IUniversity

u'd like to know about
Pont. Mailing the
upon is the surest way
get in touch with him.

L

I

I

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