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December 02, 1969 - Image 6

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1969-12-02

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Page Six

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Tuesday, December 2, 1969

P age Six THE MICHIGAN DAILY

DRUGS, CoOUNSELING, STUDENT POWER

The Seventh Annual

Feldkamp's memos stir inaction

1

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WHERE YOU STAY IS MOST OF THE FUN{
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* 6 DAYS, 5 NIGHTS IN THE BEST HOLLYWOOD MOTOR INNS (AAA,
POOLS, TV) where you'll find-: the movie stars, stars' homes, the "in"
discotheques, the Sunset Strip and ...ACTION
* ALL BUS TRANSPORTATION-To and from Airport,
Parade and Game, including luggage
* INSURANCE, L.A. TOUR BOOK AND DISCOUNT GOURMET
DINING COUPONS
* TOURNAMENT OF ROSES PARADE
with a deluxe cold chicken box lunch and beverage
SPECIAL BONUS-FREE HERTZ CAR for Each Group of Four
Student Government Council will FOR SPECIAL GROUP
maintain staff in our motels to help ARRANGEMENTS CALL
our campus representatives
you with problems of health, police, John Yablonky
finding friends, etc. Tom Zick-
SGC STAFF SERVICES PROVIDED
WE ARE A COMPANY DEALING IN STUDENT SERVICES. WE HAVE SPONSORED SUCCESSFUL ROSE BOWL
SPECIALS FOR THE PAST 6 YEARS (LAST YEAR WE BROUGHT 1900 OHIO STATE STUDENTS) AND, AGAIN
THIS YEAR, WE ARE OFFERING OUR SERVICES TO FACULTY, STUDENTS, STAFF AND THEIR FAMILIES.
WE ARE "ROSE BOWL SPECIALISTS"; IN FACT WE ARE THE ONLY ORGANIZATION OFFERING A TOUR AT
THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN WHO HAS OPERATED A TOUR TO THE ROSE BOWL FOR THE LAST 6 CON-
SECUTIVE YEARS. . . OUR TRIPS ARE PLANNED AND CONTRACTED ONE YEAR IN ADVANCE GUARAN-
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PARTURES.
"INVESTIGATE ROSE BOWL TRIPS." CHECK THE HOTEL LOCATIONS. ARE THEY NEAR THE AIRPORT? ARE
THEY ON REMOTE CAMPUSES?.. . THAT'S NOT WHERE THE ACTION IS!!

(Continued frou Pagc I
bery, assistant resident iireclor
of Adams House, West Quad. "I
don't know of anyone who has
had to report a student in West
Quad," he adds.
Winbery claims, though, that
there is an understanding be-
tween his resident director and
himself that they would not re-
port students to the police un-
less a problem were very ser-
ious.
A resident adviser in Bush
House, South Quad, says s h e
was told to counsel students
first and then report, if neces-
sary, to the assistant resident
director - who reports to the
resident director who informs
the building director who re-
ports to Feldkamp, who would
report the incident to the po-
lice if he deemed it necessary.
This method of reporting to
the next higher authority, she
says, takes the onus off a par-
ticular staff member and does
not antagonize the students
against the staff.
Although another staff mem-
ber thought this amounted to
copping out, this staff member
said she would only start the
process in a very serious case.
when she thought the police
should be notified anyway.
But once the information
goes beyond the resident ad-
viser, nothing crops up quite
so much as buck-passing,. which
everyone seems to take part in.
Feldkamp sy resident ad-
visers should report to the po-
lice or to their building clirec-
is then obligated to report, the
violation straight to the police.
"I encourage the directors to
report directly to the p olice
rather than to me since they a ir:,
there and know the situation,"
Feldkamp l)says.
But Feldkamp may find tlhe
buck passed to him anyway.
Says Leon' West, West Quad
building director, "I would not
go directly to the police but to
Feldkamp first.,"
THAT
DOG
ON
WHEELS
SIS
I COMING

Ote reSi(Ielt (lirector believes Felditinmp's
tIi(t)lOil the power of stiideit governments is
unlfounlIdd11and extremely condescend ing; to
stildIIits. "I iclsclihose by the stlidiiS," he
lmotes. 1li sg ( rei(ng g lfij ith thed irector of llni-
VerSIy lousiiig, le ilSists tlt the students (l1so

For' all the circumlocution, all
the 'higher ups' say they have
vet to act ually' lace the problem
of reportvin to the police--a
situation withich may be the re-
sLlt of mutiny from below.
'Any knowledge of drug
u'sage which is reported to inc
is 110t, for any reason, passed
on to my building director,''
says one resident director, "I'm
sure he'd report directly to the
police."
Markley Hall Bluilding Direc -
tor Joseph Rossmeirsays the
severity of the case would de-

(1551 ile~l Ie~j)OllSibility
ilk~ailg p)ower.
te'rmnn whet her he repor todI
the diug usage.
'If the person is not a pusr
but a casual drug user I would
almost assuredly not report him
to tie police." says Rossmeier.
Hle believes the resident adviser
can do morq for the person in
counseling than by reporting
him to the police.
Carol Castor, assistant build-
ing dir'ector at Couzens, believes
that "any kind of blatant drug
usage must be reported." But she
says she would first counsel the
student before she decided to
go to the housing director or the
police.
Confidential counseling - as
well as the counselors' obliga-
tions is the subject of sev-
eral contradictory memos from
the housing director.
sesthat keep-
ing ai s tudent's confidence is an
important element of housing
office policy. One memo, in fact,
says only information on illegal
drug use obtained "other thana
through conidential counseling
relationships" should be re-
ported.
Feldkamp notes, however, that
the office's confidential coun-
eling policy has "no real pro-
tection'' in a court-
But he argues for breaking
confidence in more places than
the witness stand.

(iolig 1it-ith lCcisiol-
"It is, howvever, inportant
that when you accept a con-
fidence you do so with the un-
derstanding that you will judge
whether or not the confidence
will be shared with more quali-
fied staff members . .. No other
agreement will give you the
needed flexibility to do what is
best for the student," the memo
states.
The reasoning for this con-
tradiction, says Feldkamp, be-
sides the lack of legal pi-otec-
tion, is that the resident direc-
tor must be informed of any-
thing which might adversely af-
fect individuals inthe house
or the entire dormitory,
Nonetheless, many resident
advisers say they are unaware
of this "confidential counsel-
ing - but" policy, and they
firmly assert that they never
have nor ever will discuss any-
thing learned through counsel-
ing.
"I would not release informa-
tion even if I was told to," says
Adams House Assistant Resident
Director Winbery.
"Not by a long shot," asserts
Bauer. He also claims that many
staff memos "fail to take into
account the human conscience.,"
Thus. says Bauer, he does not
ignore these memos, but puts
them in the "proper frame of
reference."
Adds Jack Myers, president
of Inter-House Assembly, the
voluntary student vovernment of
the residence halls, "The pos-
sibility of not keeping a stu-
dents' confidence or informing
him that anything he says may
be told to someone else destroys
the idea of counseling."
"If a guy tells me he's killed
someone, I'd think seriously -
it's a different story," he adds.
But if a student told him he
was smoking grass, he would
not tell anyone.
The third memo which is a
cause of some disagreement be-
tween 0te housing office and the
dormitory staff concerns t h e
extent of recognized student
povrin the dorm system.
F,,idkamp writes in his memo
that, except for the regentally-
delegated power of making visi-

One memo to resident ad-
visers entitled "The advisory
approach" states: "Sometimes
a student will ask you to keep
the conversation confidential.
You should tell him that you
may have to relate pertinent in-
formation to the head of the
unit
And included in "General
personnel guidelines" is the
statement: "As a staff member,
you are expected to keep con-
fidences, discussingtthem only
with responsible staff person-
nel."

tation rules, students do not
have any real authority in the
dorms, although it may appear
that they do.
Feldkamp believes this policy
is "not talking down to stu-
dents, just stating facts."
He also cites, as a basis for
his directive, President Robben
Fleming's letter last summer to
Acting Vice President for Stu-
dent Affairs Barbara Newell
that states the role of a stu-
dent advisory group is to advise
and that the group does o t
have the authority to make
policy.
Any person applying for a
housing staff position is inter-
viewed by students, says Feld-
kamp. "It'd be folly for me to
iun the office without response
from the students." he says.
"There is no portion of the
housing office which is without
student involvement."
In addition, Feldkamp says
students have full access to in-
formation and may advise be-
fore decisions are made.
"But in the last analysis the
decisions a-e made by me. SACH
Student Advisory Committee
on Housing) can be held ac-
countable-I'm the guy who's
criticized," says Feldkamp.
But once again this policy
seems to go against the grain
of some staff members.
One resident director believ-
es the memo is unfounded a n d
extremely condescending to stu-
dents.
"I was chosen by the stu-
dents," says Bauer, referring to
his assistant residence director-
ship. But, he insists that t h e
students also assume all respon-
sibility along with decision-
making.
Winbery says he definitely dis-
agrees with the memo on stu-
dent pqwer and in fact tries to
encourage student power.
"The kids make up the rules,"
Winbery says. "Because of the
students there are no hours. If
the kids didn't speak up we'd be
nowhere."
However, at least one resident
adviser. Anita Carlson of Thron-
son House, believes students just
do not care to have any power
in the dorms. The resident ad-
visers unsuccessfully are trying
to get students involved in house
governments, she believes.
Feldkamp believes students
"want to advise, not control"
dorm operations. If they are
able to do more than advise, he
fearts it would result in the lack
of quality of staff and opera-
tions.
But Myers believes that stu-
dent decision-making is "out
of his Feldkamp's) control."
Myers is, confident the Board
of Governors of the Residence
Halls soon will approve student
selection of staff.
And Myers does not really fear
the power of the directives.
"More overriding than any-
thing he says tin his three di-
rectives) is the laissez-faire at-
titude of the staff," says Myers.
Some of the staff is responsive
to the directives, says one re-
sident director in West Quad.
But he adds that there are de-
grees of ignoring the memos.
The housing office is actually
separated from the residence
halls, this resident director be-
lieves. Feldkamp issues his di-
rectives, but the housing staff
for the most part ignores them.

AITENTIOII

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I

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