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November 25, 1969 - Image 2

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1969-11-25

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'age Two

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Tuesday, November 25, 1969

~ag e Two THE MICHIGAN DAILY Tuesday, November 25, 1969

cinema

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

Ode to
By NEAL GABLER
When I heard that P e t e r
Fonda was making a "serious"
film about two itinerant motor-
cyclists, I snickered. Comne on!
Peter Fonda, graduate of t h e
Roger Corgan School of Act-
ing, making a serious film? But
somehow either he has trans-
cended his former self or t h e
film transcends him, because
Easy Rider is one of the best
films I've seen this year.
It seems that this film is
destined to be misunderstood by
many people, young as well as
old. Already. a cult has grown
bemoaning the fate of the two
heroes at the hands of nasty
Southern rednecks. But this is
not a good guys - bad guys movie
with the Cowboys being the cyc-
lists and the Indians, the red-
necks. This is a film about a
nation of people who are trap-
ped by an ethic and see no way
out.
The protagonists Wyatt-Cap-
tain America (Peter Fonda) and
Billy the Kid (Dennis Hopper)
make a fortune smuggling dope
and stash the bankroll in their

'what used to be a good country'

cycles' tanks. Then off they
zoom for the Mardi Gras, care-
free. Or are they free? Sure they
have long hair and wear wild
clothes and smoke pot. But what
Easy Rider tells us is that they
aren't any freer than Mr. Su-
burbia or even the Southerners
who hate them. Wyatt and Billy
are Americans, caught in the
American culture. What Wyatt
comes gradually to realize and
what Billy never realizes, is
that all the money crammed in
the gas tank can't buy t h e m
freedom.
Not only is he an American,
but Billy is middle-class Amer-
ice personified; only his cloth-
es and manners are different.
When he says to Wyatt, "We're
rich. We did it. We're retired in
Florida," he could just as well
have been talking to his plat-
inum blonde wife, in his subur-
ban ranchhouse with the two-
car garage and his kids at the
U of M. The point is, we
shouldn't go around feeling so
superior to those dullards of the
silent majority, because we're all
in the same fix. That's w h y
Captain America says, in those

now famous words, "We blew
it."
The search for happiness takes
them across the Southern Uni-
ted States through a quiet farm,
a commune and a few s m all
towns. Laszlo Kovas' photogra-
phy is breath-taking. With the
fabulous landscapes and the
fine music (the track includes
The Weight, Born to be Wild,
Its' Alright Ma', I Wasn't, Born
to Follow), I didn't even care
that a large part of the film is
filler to get Wyatt and Billy
from -one place to another. And
somehow it is appropriate that,
like many of their fellow Amer-
icans, they are always going
somewhere but never arrive.
Dennis Hopper's direction is
sharp and innovative. He has a
good eye for composition, he
juxtaposes shots nicely, and he
uses some ingenuous transitions.
Above all, he is able to get
some wonderfully natural per-
formances, especially from the
bit players, who occasionally
give the film the air of a docu-
mentary.
I talked about the new style of
non-acting when I reviewed

Alice's Restaurant. Some of the
best scenes in Easy Rider u s e
townsfolk whom Hopper and Co.
happened to find along the way.
In one classic scene, guaranteed
to boil the blood, a group of
crackers in a diner brandish
some Southern wit. "I think
she's cute." "Put 'em in a cage
and charge admission." "Looks
like a bunch of refugees from a
gorrilla love-in." The remark-
able, and frightening, thing is
that these are not actors; they
are just folks speaking t h e i r
own minds.
Dennis Hopper is perfect as
Billy - crude, dim-witted, fun-
ny, lovable. His feat is extra-
ordinary considering the gen-
uine affection the audience
comes to feel for this loud-
mouthed pothead. Peter Fonda
may be nice to look at, girls, but
he has all the range of a Steve
McQueen. Always cerebral, ev-
ery line gets the same dispas-
sionate treatment; he's got no
soul. He had me hoping that
someone would get his goat just
to show he was human after
all.
Jack Nicholson as George

Hansen, an alcoholic lawyer the
boys meet on their journey,
gives the film's outstanding per-
formance. Nicholson has been
stuck in a lot of Corman hor-
ror flicks, and here he finally
gets a chance to show his tal-
ent. He is brilliant in creat-
ing a whole character from a
few characteristics. I found in
his cornpone ACLU lawyer, a
simple wisdom that came not so
much from his dialogue as from
his whole presence.
For all this, Easy Rider is not
a flawless film. For one thing,
there is Fonda's unfeeling act-
ing. For another, there are
some very affected lines. Fin-
ally, there is an LSD scene,
flashly camera work and all,
that seems right out of a
pseudo-hip Film About Young
People. But these are small
faults in what is otherwise a
very good film.
Easy Rider must be seen, but
not as the story of an unortho-
dox life style in an intolerant
land. It should be seen as the
story of a nation that, in George
Hansen's words, "used to be a
hell of a good country."

The Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publication of The Univer-
sity of Michigan. Notices should be
sent in TYPEWRITTEN form to
3528 LSA before 2 p.m. of the day
preceding publication and by 2
p.m. Friday for Saturday and Sun-
day. Items may appear only once.
Student organization notices a r e
not accepted for publication. For
information, phone 764-9270.
TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 25
Day Calendar
Wind Instrument Department S t u-
dent Recital: School of Music Recital
Hall, 11:30 am.
Center for South and Southeast
Asian Studies Lecture: Joseph W. Eld-
er, Professor of Sociology, University of
Wisconsin, "Two Trips to Hanoi": Audi-
torium B, Angell Hall, 4:00 p.m.
Psysics-Astronomy: Theoretical Sem-
inar: RomaneJackiw, MIT, "Uses of
Ener,_y Momentum Tensor"; P & A
Colloquium Room, 4:00 p.m.
General Notices
E xtrai Library Hours: On Saturday,
December 13, the General Library will
be open from 8:00 a.m. until 12:00 mid-
night.
The Undergrad. Library will be open
each day from 8:00 am, until 5:00
a.m. the following morning from
Thursday, December 11 until Friday,
Dec. 19.
On Friday, November 28 both the Gen-
eral Library and the Undergraduate
Library will be open from 1:00 p.m. un-
til 12:00 midnight.
Any changes in the schedules of the
branch libraries will be posted in the
respective libraries.
Student Accounts: Your attention is
called to the following rules passed
by the Regents on February 28, 1936:
"Students shall pay all accounts due
the University not later than the last
day of classes of each semester or sum-
mer session. Student loans which are
not paid or renewed are subject to this
regulation rhowever,student loans not
yet due are exempt. Any unpaid ac-
counts at the close of business on the
last day of classes will be reported to
the Cashier of the University and
"(a) All academic credits will be
withheld, the grades for the semester
or summer session just complete will
not be released, and no transcript of
credits will be issued.
"(b) All students owing such ac-
counts will not be allowed to register
I - - -- ----
-5'

in any subsequent semester or summer
session until payment has been made."
Academic Costume: May be rented atE
Moe Sport Shop, 711 North University
Avenue. Orders for Winter Commence-
I ment Exercises shouldbe place4im-
mediately, and MUST be placed beforej
November 29.
Swimming - Women Students: T h e
Margaret Bell Pool will be closed be-
ginning Wed. eve., Nov. 26, through
Sun. afternoon. Nov. 30. It will reopen
Sun, Nov. 30, 6:30-9:00.
Placement Service
3200 S.A.B.
GENERAL DIVISION
Announcement of Late Interview Date:
Please call 763-1363 to make appoint-
ments:
December 3, all day:
Boy Scouts of America, General lib-
eral arts graduates for promoting andj
supervising scouting programs nation-
wide.
SUMMER PLACEMENT SERVICE
212 SAB, Lower Level
December 5 is deadline for filing ap-
plications for federal Jobs in the sum-
mer examination, exam given on Jan.
10.
Phillips Exeter Academy, New Romp-
shire, offers Jrs, Srs, and graduate
students openings as teaching intern
in various subjects. Further details at
S.P.S.
Newspaper Fund, Inc., Brunswick,
N.-. and openings with major news-
-

papers throughout the U.S., Jrs. inter-
ested in journalism.
Inspiration Consolidated CopperCo.,
Arizona, summer programs for engi-
neers in metallurgy, electrical chem,
mining and mechanical.
Union C"rbide Corporation, Oak
Ridge, Tenn., offers Jr, Sr, and grad
students in biol chem, math engrg phy-
sics summer programs.
Army and Air Force Exchange Serv-
ice offers summer intern programs for
sophomoes and js in many part of the
country, good mgmt. trng.
ENGINEERING PLACEMENT
SERVICE
128 H, W. Engrg. Bldg.
Attn: T students planning to inter-
view during the Winter Term:
Register for Placement Service by Dec.
1.
Registrantsrdesiring to revise College
Interview Form for iWnter Term -
submit revision by Dec. 1.
December graduates of this year -
your College Interview Forms will be
destroyed on Dec. 1, unless you notify
the Placement Office to continue serv-
ice.
ORGANIZATION
I NOTICES
The Ageless Science of Yoga
Asana & Posture Class sponsored by
Self Reaiation Fellowship. Call 761-
9825 after 6:00 p.m.

UNAUTHORIZED ADVERTISING OF HIS SHOW?

How Jim Duizo lost his show on

By STEVE KOPPMAN
"WAAM PRESENTS AN
HOUR OF ANTI-WAR SONGS
- WEDNESDAY, OCT. 15 . ..
ON J I M DULZO'S 'SPEC-
TRUM'" said the flier. And Jim
Dulzo doesn't broadcast 'Spec-
trum' on WAAM anymore.
Dulzo, a literary college jun-
ior who got the show on the lo-
cal radio station just 10 months
ago, was fired.
"It's really too bad I got fir-
ed because it looked like WAAM
was against war," he says. "It's
most unfortunate that a radio
station, whether on purpose or
by accident, can't c o m e out
against killing."
Station officials deny the fir-
ing was political, however.
"Failing to clear this adver-
tising was a clear violation of
policy," charges assistant sta-
tion manager Larry Zimmer.
"We had no objection whatso-
ever to h i s playing anti-war
songs," Zimmer adds. "We have

no editorial policy," he explains,
"and this makes it appear that
we do."
"We never made any move to
regulate his m u s i c," says
WAAM manager Wayne Adair.
"But we objected to his putting
out this paper -,- it was the
straw t h a t broke the camel's
back."
"I did the show because of my
beliefs," Dulzo says simply, "and
I did the advertising because I
thought it would help the
show."
WAAM isn't traditionally a
progressive rock station. T h e
predominant fare on the station
is light, 'housewife' music. But,
last December, the station hired
Dulzo to do 'Spectrum' a 10
p.m.-la.m. show of rock and
folk.
"I was always severely lim-
ited," says Dulzo, "apparently
what they wanted was j u s t
three more hours of music. They
wanted me to ignore reality."

"I sincerely believe in the type
of show Jim did," says Zimmer.
"I still think Jim's a very tal-
ented person."
Dulzo says that with the lack
of advertising not many people
could find out about a show
like his being on WAAM. "I had
a girl call me once," he says,
"after I'd been on the show for
eight months. She lived three
blocks from WAAM and h a d
never heard of my show."
But apparently, Dulzo a 1 s o
had some enthusiastic fans. One
of them, Greg Schulz, was so in-
censed about Dulzo's firing that
he sent an open letter to the
station and started circulating
petitions.
"I feel they're taking away my
right to evaluate what comes
over the airwaves," says Schulz.
"Also, the fact is it was a very
good show. T hey destroyed a
really good show."
Adair and Zimmer insist that
the distribution of a thousand
fliers on the Diag by a N e w
Mobilization worker who is a
friend of Dulzo's was only the
last of a long series of rule vio-
lations.
"This was a culmination,"
says Zimmer. "It was more than
we could take. Jim had repeat
edly failed to follow administra-
tive procedures within the sta-
tion. He had visitors in the con-
trol room and he didn't record
changes properly in the log."
"We've got to follow FCC
rules," says Zimmer, "and it's
Jim's nature not to follow
rules."
"You can't run a ship," says
Adair, "with one man breaking
the rules."
"They should have taken. me

aside two weeks ago," says Dul-
zo, "and said, 'Look - you're
coming to a culmination.' I
categorically deny that I was
continually b r e a k i n g station
rules. I did rather broadly in-
terpret some of the rules, but
these charges are really exag-
gerated."
"The mistake I made was not
looking at the leaflet before it
was circulated," says Dulzo,
"but I'm bitter about the com-
plaint that I didn't clear the
publicity. In ten months, they
didn't spend one goddam dime
on publicity for the show. I
asked repeatedly if I could do
some advertising-they repeat-
edly turned me down."
Dulzd now has a show, 'Liber-
ation,' on WOIA-FM. He seems
to like it there.
"I'm much happier being
there," he says, "I can be my-
self. WOIA has given me pub-
licity -- they're willingto push
the show. And I just might

WAAJI
There doesn't seem to be
much hard feeling on either side
of the WAAM-Dulzo dispute.
"We're very sorry to have Jim
gone," says Zimmer. "He was
good for us-he had a certain
spirit. Everybody liked him."
"I was good friends with
everyone over there," agrees
Dulzo. "I don't take it person-
ally." He still finds the circum-
stances of his firing difficult to
accept. "I wish I'd got fired,"
he says, "for coming in drunk
or raping a secretary or some-
thing."
NATIONAL ENERAL CORPORATIO

"'The LIBERTINE'
COMES ACROSS*
INCREDIBLY
WITH WRY
HUMOR
AND TASTE."
-Hep:Iarpr '~
-Nre' u aCatheririe Spa k
is Curious Green,
with enewy..and
decides to become
a ofe-WomafA
Kinsey sex survey."
,-, e,W a

STARTS
TOMORROW
"X",
no one under 1 8
will be admitted

"Makes
H ugh Eefner's
Playboy Penthouse
look ike a
nursery school I"

FOX EASTERN THEATRES
FOX VILLAGE
375 No. MAPLE RD.-769.1300
- HURRY! ENDS SOON
MON.-WED.-7:10-9:20
THURS.-SUN.-1 :00-3:05-
5:10-7:15-9:30

PADLEY METGER

t",n.
"THE IBERTINE"

1

1

E

..

Drive raises Funds to
equip Power Theatre

Over 60 members of the First
Nighter Club of the Power Cen-
ter for the Performing Arts have
been recruited from Ann Arbor
and surrounding communities,
reports Mrs. James C. Riecker,
chairman of the campaign for
funds to equip the new theater.
The c a m p a i g n committee
hopes to raise $368,000 to pro-.
vide the most modern equip-
ment for staging and lightning
every type of performance, from
dance to classical drama. Mrs.
Robben W. Fleming serves ast
honorary chairnian.
Gifts from the Eugene B.
Power family of Ann Arbor and
a number of donors to the Uni-
versity's 55 Million Campaign a
have made construction of the ;
theater possible.
"To help raise the needed
funds, we have established the
First Nighter Club, a group of
committed theater lovers who
contribute $1,000 and over-
spread, if requested, over a three
year period," said Mrs. Riecker.
"Our early. returns confirm our
belief that the idea has great f
appeal and that there are many
people who ar eilng to give

substantial support for good
theater in Ann Arbor."
First Nighters will be entitled
to first choice on seats for thea-
ter subscriptions and individual
performances, and invitations to
special theater events and re-
hearsals.
The Michigan Daily, edited and man-
aged by students at the University of
Michigan. News phone: 764-0552. Second
Class postage paid at Ann Arbor, Mich-
igan, 420 Maynard St., Ann Arbor,+-
Michigan 48104. Published daily Tues-j
day through Sunday morning Univer-'
sity year. Subscription rates: $10 by
carrier, $10 by mail.
Summer Session published Tuesday
through Saturday morning. Subscrip-
tion rates: $3.00 by carrier, $3.00 by
mail.
I M YWI
MEET YOUR MATCH WITH i

note that WOIA cancelled all its
regular programming on Oct.
15 and let every disc jockey
make his own personal state-
ment."
OuIEand
A THE
IWAor

2a9ttw £iUf Wi f fSINI
BUTCH CASSIDY AND
THE SUNDANCE KID
NEXT-"Take The Money & Run"

W3"W50lNG
Reested by COLUMBIA PICTURES
COLOR
ram Information 662-6264

I

Progi
SHOWA

ENDS TONIGHT
"PUTNEY SWOPE"-6:30 and 9:30
"ONE POTATO, TWO POTATO''-8:00 only

V'

WHAT MAKES PEOPLE LAUGH SO
HARD THEY CRY? Laurel and Hardy
were perhaps the funniest comedy
team who ever lived. They probably
couldn't tell you why. They just knew
how.
And the reason the secret remains a
secret - is because nobody really
knows the answer. All you can really
do is look at those geniuses carrying
on-and sit back and laugh. The best

/S at

1, 3, 5, 7, & 9:05 P.M.

.t*ntn
Catherine Spaak .a Jean-Lauis Trintignant
Prdu.nd by ,,iM.,,,,,,.II *ic DrscU4 by P..q.s is Fa.C.p....
EAST,"AANCO OR
3d....,' hoas VAAUDUBON FTLMIS
I 'T rorumI

.-i

.: []

1

,, , r

ONE

IDS
CALL 769-5079 or write
P.O. Box 2137,
Ann Arbor, Mich. 48106

4V
3020 Washtenaw, Ph. 434-1782
Between Ypsilanti & Ann Arbor
SHOW TIMES
Wed., Sat., Sun,
1:30-4:00-6:30-9:00
Mon., Tues., Thurs., Fri.
6:30-9:00
'tea "w"
Battl
oIaae1Uiei
?rodiaUo

MAC ROACWS 14EWO
"THE CRAZY WORLD Of LAUREL & HARDY"
PROOIJCED "Y MAL ROACH A JAY WARD PRODUCTION
ASSOCIATE PROOUCER:RAYMOND ROMAUER
NARRATED SY GARRY MOORE
and b
ILA
'~t1
NONEd
W. C. Fields (also known asa
Mahatma Kane Jeeves)
in one hour of classic irreverence - i
" The Barber ShopN
- The Pharmacist
" The Fatal Glass of Beer
Distributed
Presented by Raymond Rohauer EriFrals
STARTS
WEDNESDAY

ni

opportunity to do
ust that is being
liven to you now in a
brand new full length
eature of the very fun-
niest moments from
heir very funniest
alkies.
For the confirmed ad-
dicts and for those
about to discover this
mmortal comedy team,
we present their crazy
world.
by Joseph Brenner Associales
taJy WWWFLACTVIED RICKERS"
DIAL
8-6416

The BltMidrash of Ann Arbor
is pleased to announce the following courses for the
WINTER TERM
THE CHASSIDIC VIEW ON THE EXISTENCE
AND PURPOSE OF THE UNIVERSE
An introduction to Chassidic philosophy. Discusses the role of the Jew in the
world, and his relation to the ultimate unity of the spiritual and the material in
the EIN SOF, the wellspring of all being. Text: COLLECTED SAYINGS (Tanya) of
Rabbi Schneur Zalman.
The course will be taught by Rabbis Yitschak Aharon Mann and Yitschok
Kagan, among the leaders of the Chabad Chassidism in America.
JEWISH MUSIC
A guided tour through the golden treasures of Jewish melody, which arose out
of the Jewish experience in many lands, past and present, East and West. Listen-
ing, with cormmentary by the instructor.
The course will be taught by Asher Ben-Yohanan, a leading Israeli musician

I

I

I

T"V RENTALS
$10 per month
FREE Service and Delivery
---NO DEPOSIT REQUIRED---
CALL:
Nejac TV Rentals
662-5671
SERVING BIG 10 SCHOOLS SINCE 1961
_ L .i .L . 1

and composer.
HEBREW FOR BEGINNERS

Mrs. Ruth Cohen

""uTcho b'at, aPanatJono
II~3~-!tatted Artists

I

Grammar and conversational Hebrew for people with no background in the
language. Emphasis on comprehension of modern Hebrew, oral expression and
composition.
This class will meet twice a week.

1)

i

-

HEBREW SPEAKING CLUB

Mr. Avram Hochstein

STUDENTS INTERNATIONAL, INC.
FLIGHT SCHEDULE
DETROIT METRO DEPARTURES

Hebrew conversation in an enjoyable, informal setting. All welcome.

INTERMEDIATE HEBREW

Mrs. Chava Kopelman

I

For graduates of Beginner's Hebrew. Students with some Hebrew background
can determine their appropriate level of placement by consultation with the in-
structor.

Flight Number
1 1

Date
Dec. 22-Jan. 6

Univer
STUDEN

sity of Michigan
TS AND FACULTY
FLY TO
AIM" 'JTiL ZN

2 May 4-June 9
3 May 5-June 25
4 May 15-Aug. 20
5 June 26-Aug. 26
6 July 16-Aug. 31
7 May 6-June 23
Dec. 28-Jan. 2

Weeks
Xmas
4
6
12
6
6
6

To
London
London
London
London
London
Expo Japan
Paris
Rose Bowl

Price
$189
$189
$199
$209
$229
$419
$169
$144
$189
$199
$189

BASIC JUDAISM

Rabbi Gerald Goldman

This course covers the basic trends of Jewish thought and expression, as re-
vealed in three classics of Judaism-the Torah, the Siddur, and the Mishnah-and
their application to modern life.
Rabbi Goldman is the new director of the Hillel Foundation at Michigan.

THEMES IN AMERICAN JEV
LIFE

Mr. Harrison and Mr. Rockaway

NEW YORK DEPARTURES

Winter term topics include: Jews in a non-Jewish world, Jewish liberalism:
myth or reality?, Black-Jewish relations.

Eu-

8
9
10

May 5-June 24
May 14-Aug. 14
June 14-July 22

6
12
6

London
London
London

BEYOND ADAM AND EVE:

:

V.v__ kA--t_:_l C tCt0

I

I

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