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September 05, 1969 - Image 3

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The Michigan Daily, 1969-09-05

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sec(ond front page

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NEWS PHONE: 764-0552
BUSINESS PHONE: 764-0554

HELD OVER!
SHOWS AT:
1:00-3:00
5:00 and 7:00 P.M.
Program Information Dial DOORS OPEN 12:45
NO 2-6264
ACADEMY AWARD
WINNER

.. .

Friday, September 5, 1969 Ann Arbor, Michigan Page Three

..

Growing anti-

war

fever

JOSEPHE
PRESENTS
A
MIKE NIC
LAWREN
P"OUCTI

BEST DIRECTOR-MIKE NICHOLS
E. LEVINg
IHOLS
CE TURMAN.. .

By BOB FUSFELD
The anti-war movement began to
recover from the doldrums this sum-
mer as Senate doves went on the at-
tack against the Nixon's administra-
tion's handling of the Paris peace
negotiations.
The grass roots opposition began
to pick up, too, and part of it lies
here at the University.
"We are calling for a massive anti-
war offensive this fall which will force
the Nixon administration to withdraw
American forces from Vietnam im-
mediately," said Gene Gladstone, a
member of the New Mobilization
steering committee.
The University's contribution will
be a teach-in the weekend of Sept.

19 to plan and coordinate local anti-
war activities.
"This teach-in will not function as
an educational meeting," explained
Prof. Glen Waggoner, history. "We
are trying to set up a framework
for the planning and coordinating of
anti-war activities on campus this
year."
Coordination is the goal of the 40-
professor group that has spent much
time this summer preparing the
teach-in.
"We hope to provide a neutral
framework that will allow planning
of activities this fall," said P r o f.
Ernest Young, history. "We will pro-
vide room for any type of action for
people of good will."

"What, we are doing is providing
a vehicle through which people who
wish to take action against the war
can organize," he added.
The facol point of the teach-in will
be a speech by Rennie Davis, (WHO
IS HE??) at Hill Aud. on the evening
of Friday, Sept. 19.
Davis recently returned from North
Vietnam where he helped obtain the
release of several American prisoners
of war.
Howard Zinn, author of Vietnam:
The Logic of Withdrawal; David Del-
linger, coordinator of the 1967 Penta-
gon march who was heavily involved
in Chicago anti-war activities in 1968;
and armed forces organizer Andrew
Pulley will also appear at the teach-in.

spurs movement
But since speeches don't make for way t h a t the Nixon administration
organization, planning will be the could ignore such massive opposition
function of activities on Saturday, to its continuation of the Vietnam
Sept. 19. war," he said.
"Forums to organize specific ac- The teach-in grew out of a meeting
tion," in the form of workshops to of four University professors - Rich-
plan anti-war activities in the Ann ard Mann, psychology; Rhodes Mur-
Arbor area, will be the main order phey, geography; and S a m Warnr
of-the day, Gladstone said. and Ernest Young, history.
He had in mind local support of a "Vietnam - Times Up," is the slo-
boycott of classes and businesses Oct. gan for the teach-in in light of what
15 and a massive campaign to remove Gladstone called frustration with the
ROTC from campus, Nixon administration's handling of
The culmination of the nation-wide the war.
anti-war fall protests will be a march "There are now, even after the
in Washington in November similar much-publicized troop withdrawals,
to previous demonstrations there, more American soldiers in Vietnam
If it gets the o n e million people than when Johnson left office," he
Gladstone is hoping for, "there is no said.

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the
news to day
l IThe A oc ial/4 /P),, nd lloth PressSertnre

Faculty report cites need

ANNE BANCROFLDUSTIN HOFFMAN KATHARNROSS
,tAfl%\*~ Uscw;,s*
CALDER WILLINGHAM. BUCK HENRY PAUL SIMON
SIMON.GARFUNKEL LAWRENCE TURMAN
MIKE NICHOLS TECHNICOLOR* PANAVISION" unclassified
"I CANNOT IMAGINE ANYONE WHO CARES ABOUT THE OUAL-
ITY OF OUR CULTURE, EVEN DISTANTLY, MISSING 'ONTEREY
POP': RARELY DOES A MOVIE OF ANY SORT PROVIDE SO
MUCH STIMULATION FOR THOUGHT. ONE OF THE TRULY
INVALUABLE ARTIFACTS OF OUR ERA." (RL )
"AESTHETICALLY AND AURALLY STUNNING"(.di )
"AN ELECTRIFYING AND ELEC- o
TRIFIED PICTURE."" f(ter) d °t
"UPBEAT..THE WAY TOA NEW 8
KIND OF MUSICA L" (HR ata Adler }
JANISJ PUINWITH GBRUI R KANDTHEH D
INGCOMPN TMC AM A 1
PASCANNEDH A HUGHMAEKAJF 0
NAIRPLANWI HGRACES LKERI B 0 NN
DTHEANIMALSTHEWHOCOUNTRYJOEAN THE '
FISHOTISREDDINGJIMIHENDRIXRAVISHANKAR
MOM M EY PopBY .A. PENNEAKER 1
FILMED AT THE MONTEREY INTERNATIONAL POP FESTIVAL
A LEAC PENNEAKER RELEASE itcotr
ALSO: GEORGE C. SCOTT, JULIE CHRISTIE
in "PETULIA"
"Petulia is a strange, lovely film-..-.
perfectly formed and crafted! -N.Y. Times

for

revision

of

ROTC

PRESIDENT NIXON yesterday ordered an immediate 75
per cent cutback on contracts for federal construction.
Nixon said the cutback would dampen inflation and ease the
rising cost of housing.
However, C. J. Haggerty, president of the AFL-CIO Construc-
tion and Building Trades Department said the cutback could cripple
efforts to put more blacks into construction jobs. In tha past several
weeks, black groups have held protests in Pittsburgh and Chicago
as part of a national drive to eliminate discrimination in building
trades unions.
In related action, a black organization in Chicago yesterday
turned down an offer by the city's construction industry of 1,000
journeyman's jobs. The Coalition for United Community Action also
rejected an offer of training programs for construction-related jobs.
NORTH KOREA yesterday warned it would not release the
crewmen of an American helicopter shot down last month unless
the U.S. admits they were on a "criminal mission."
The United States has said it would admit only that the heli-
copter entered Communist territory inadvertently and would pledge
that such an incident would not recur.
However, there was speculation that eventually the United States
would secure the release of the airmen by signing a letter of "con-
fession," accompanied by a repudiation of the statement. This was
the method used to obtain the release of the crew of the U.S.S.
Pueblo.
THE NIXON ADMINISTRATION yesterday asked the Senate
to make several changes in the tax reform bill passed by the
House.
The proposed changes would reduce tax relief on individualj
incomes by $1.1 billion while cutting back the increase in corporate
taxes from $4.9 billion to $3.5 billion. The net effect, according to
Secretary of the Treasury David M. Kennedy would be to cut the
loss of federal revenue under the tax reform bill to $1.3 billion.
Kennedy said the bill passed by the House favored consump-
tion "to the potential detriment" of the nation's production.
f
ISRAELI TROOPS crossed into southern Lebanon today
and raided a small village.
According to the Israeli army, twelve buildings were destroyed
in Halda, a village two miles inside Lebanon.
The Israeli army reported earlier that Israeli jets raided Jordan
yesterday for the second consecutive day. The army said the Jets
bombed guerilla bases and a Jordanian army outpost north of the'
Dead Sea.
NATIONAL GUARD units were ordered into Aliceville, Ala.
yesterday following disorders by young blacks.
Governor Albert Brewer said the blacks damaged a school and
were "roving the streets." According to Col. Floyd Mann, the state'

By ROBERT KRAFTOWITZ
A faculty committee studying the relationship between the Uni-
versity and ROTC yesterday cited a need for "revision of the rela-
tionship or severance" of University-ROTC ties.
In its preliminary report, the academic affairs committee of the
Senate Assembly stated, "the committee is agreed that irrespective
of the current political climate, the relationship between ROTC and
the University needs to be revised, drastically in the opinion of
some."
The brief five page report is being distributed to members of
the faculty senate today along with 39 pages of appendices. A final
report with specific recommendations is expected Oct. 1.
Under the revision alternative the preliminary report cites major
features of the present ROTC-University ties that should be altered

if ROTC remains on campus:
-- The University's $80,000
grantedhannually in direct alloca-
tions to the ROTC programs. Ac-
cording to the report this figure
may be as high as $350,000 if one
accounts for all building space
rented by the University for
ROTC.
"This amounts to an annual
contribution to the budget of the
Department of Defense, w h i c h
we feel to be inappropriate," the
report states.
Academic credit for ROTC'
courses. "They should be care-
fully reconsidered by the various{
colleges.''
- Academic titles for ROTCj
officers and ROTC's departmental
status. They were found to bet
inappropriate.
The committee is also consider-
ing completely severing ties with
the military training program.
The relevant issues, the reportI

Radicals
plan action
on ROTC
By LAURIE HARRIS
Preliminary plans for action
against ROTC were formulated
Wednesday night at a meeting of
representatives from five radical
campus organizations and several
individuals.
The plan, said Barry Bluestone,
Grad., is "positive militant dia-
logue." "When a ROTC teacher
says this is ROTC 101, I will in-
tervene and say, 'No, this is
Fascism 101,'" Bluestone explain-
ed.

MONTEREY POP 6:20, 9:25

PETULIA 7:40 only

--As<,,iated Press
Spenidinig citt
Dr. Arthur F. Burns, key advisor to President Nixon, announced
yesterday that the administration planned a reduction in new
federal spending. Burns said the spending cut was part of a larger
effort to free manpower and machinery for more private home
construction
" " "
Lug transplantg die
at University Hospital
Albert L. Carnick, 50, of Bloomfield Hills, Michigan's first human

FIFTH FORUM
761-9700

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from Michigan Union north on
State St. to Liberty. West on
Liberty to 5th. North % block
to theatre

marimekko

public safety director, the troops were sent after authorities in lung transplant, died at 6:44 a.m. yesterday in University Hospital,
Aliceville asked the governor for help. Dr. William N. Hubbard Jr.. director of the University Medical
*- " *Center and dean of the Medical School. said there was "no single
TROOPS AND TANKS occupied Lybia's second largest city cause of death."
yesterday. "The patient was a very ill man before the operation, Hubbard
A radio announcement reported that the military forces entered explained, and he failed to survive thu initial recovery period, always
Benghazi, the capital of a province whose people are known to be a significant risk in extensive surgery."

loyal to King Idras I.
The king was deposed Monday by a military junta.

p

. According to Hubbard, Carnick's new lung had been functioning
better than the lung which was removed.
" "There was no sign of infection
or rejection, two major hazards
which have affected previous lung

FDA REPORT

Pill increases blood clot risk

,:.
.
°;

WASHINGTON (A) - Women
who use oral contraceptives are
four times more likely to suffer
blood clots than women who do
not, a government advisory
committee reported yesterday,
However, the Food and Drug
Administration advisory panel
concluded that the clot danger
from the pill is relatively small:
only three deaths in every 100.-
000 per year among women of
child-bearing age can be attrib-
uted to contraceptive - caused
clots.
In fact, the committee said
o r a 1 contraceptives appear to
meet federal safety require-
ments because their benefits ex-
ceed the risk.
The group's study of 175
matched pairs of women in five
eastern cities is the first major
American survey linking blood

clots to oral contraceptive pils.
The findings parallel those of
several British studies that re-
ported a 7 to 10 times greater
clot risk for pill users.
Clots can cause death when
they lodge in vital organs such
as the lung, heart, or brain.
The committee's investigators,
headed by Dr. Philip E. Satrwell
of Johns Hopkins University in
Baltimore, said the clot danger
is further heightened with so-
called sequential formulations-~
one method of oral contracep-
tion.
With sequential preparations,
the female hormone estrogen is
administered alone for part of
the menstrual cycle, then com-
bined with another hormone for
the remainder.
Other o r a 1 contraceptives

combine the two hormoies at
all times.
The committee said it is still
unclear whether the contracep-
tive pills have any link to can-
cer.
Effects of the pill on such or-
gans as the liver, thyroid, pose
no serious health hazard, the
committee added.
"When these potential haz-
ards and the value of the drugs
are balanced, the committee
finds the ratio of benefit to risk
sufficiently high to justify the
designation safe within the in-
tent of congressional legisla-
tion," the summary said.
The pill, used by millions of
women, is from two to thirty
times more effective in prevent-
ing pregnancy than other con-
traceptive devices, the commit-
tee said.

transplants elsewhere in the
world," h added.
University doctors had hoped to
control these critical factors and
prolong Carnick's life consider-
ably, Hubbard said.
Carnick was near death because
of emphysema when he received
the left lung of Richard A. May,
17, of Jackson in a six-hour and
53-minute operation Monday. He
had hovered in a state of semi-
consciousness since then and was
listed in "grave" condition.
May, the donor, had received
fatal injuries in an automobile ac-
cident early Sunday near Jackson.
Dr. Hubbard said an autopsy
would be performed on Carnick.
The family has requested thatI
memorial contributions be made
to the Albert Lee Carnick Me-
morial Research Fund for Lung
Disorders in care of Dr. Hubbard;
at the Medical Center. Funeral
arrangements are incomplete.

said, are: A meeting Sunday night for all
- "The propriety of imposing interested persons will formalize
military training on an academic tactics for next week. This will
context." Include classroom disruption, ed-
ucation through speeches in the
- Student aid supplied through dorms, co-operatives, and frater-
the OTCproram nd he as-nity and sorority houses.
ied route to meet military obliI Class disruption is tentatively
gations. scheduled to begin next Thurs-
The Unliversity's responsibil- day, with a mass meeting Wed-
ity to society and the desirability nesday night to organize the ef-
of supplying the armed forces fort in its entirety.
with college graduates. This effort to ban ROTC from
"The purpose of the prelim- the campus is the first action to
inary report is to indicate how be taken by all the various radical
far the committee has gotten and groups jointly, In includes Radi-
what line it is taking," says Class- cal Caucus, Students for a Demo-
ical Studies Prof. Theodore V. cratic Society, Resistance, Wo-
Buttrey, co-chairman of the com- men's Liberation and the Indc-
mittee. "If anyone feels they have pendent Socialist Club.
not been represented, he has an There is disagreement among
opportunity of presenting h i s the groups about tactics to be
views before we issue the final taken. Marc Van Der Hout, a
report." member of Radical Caucus, said
One committee member who "the division is between individ-
favors severance, P r o f. Bernard uals though there is a tendency
Galler, mathematics, said ROTC toward group division at the same
could continue as an off-campus time."
activity under the severance plan. Van Der Hout said, "If the
"I see no harm in ROTC mak- groups work together something
ing separate contact with the stu- constructive can come out of it."
dents." he said, "but I see little However, he added, "That ques-
justification in' continuing ROTC tion will be up in the air."
as an academic program." Marty McLaughlin, another
Although two of the ROTC member of Radical Caucus, and
commandants declined to c o m- Student Government Council pre-
ment on the report, Capt. Antonio sident, was more skeptical about
Criscuolo, naval science, was will- the arrangement. He said the
ing to discuss the work. major point of disagreement arose
He defended ROTC, citing the over the idea of "isolated or con-
passages in the schools' announce- tinuous action." He added, "Once
ment bulletins. "Through ROTC," or a few shots would be effective.
he said, "the University is hon- Every day is ludicrous and a waste
oring its commitment to aid its of time."
students to 'prepare themselves The general consensus of those
responsibly, intellectually and vo- attending the meeting was that
cationally for assuming roles in ROTC must be off campus by the
society."' end of the year. However, Eric
"The military is part of society," Chester, a member of the Inde-
he added. pendent Socialist Club, said "there
Literary College Dean William may not even be enough tactical
L. Hays said the preliminary re- agreement around the issue of
See FACULTY, Page 8 ROTC to unify the left."

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