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November 18, 1969 - Image 3

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11

FREE

CANTERBURY HOUSE
JACK THE BEAR
a play by JOHN SLADE
Mon., Tues.-Nov. 17 & 18
Doors Open 8:00 P.M..

Viet official denies

mass

ii

-

TWIN

TWIN
FEATURES
NOW

SAIGON (R) - A South Vietnamese
government official has declared he
can find no firm evidence to support
charges he said were made by vil-
lagers that U.S. troops executed 460
civilians in a sweep of hamlets in
March 1968.
Two American soldiers are under
arrest in the United States in con-
nection with the case. One, an of-
ficer, is accused of murdering an un-
specified number of South Vietnamese
civilians. The other, a staff sergeant,
is charged with assault with intent
to commit murder.
In Washington, Pentagon sources
said around 100 deaths may h a v e
occurred when the U.S. troops moved
page three

4-m

DIAL
8-6416

through a cluster of hamlets in an
area known to be a Viet Cong strong-
hold.
They added, however, that reports
published in the United States that as
many as 567 civilians were killed ap-
pear to be exaggerated.
The South Vietnamese official, Col.
Ton That Khien, suggested in a tele-
phone interview from his headquart-
ers, where he serves as chief of Quang
Ngai Province, that civilians m a y
have been killed as unfortunate war
victims in an operation in Song My
village March 16, 1968.
Asked if he believed the villagers'
reports, Khien responded: "I think
there is some truth but there is also an

extension of it. Maybe they exaggerate
because of Viet Cong propaganda,
because it is a Viet Cong hamlet and
the people have been trained by the
Communists. The people are guided
by the Viet Cong."
"I operate with the American Divi-
sion and never do they deliberately
kill -the population. If they kill civil-
ians, it's an accident." The U.S. Com-
mand in Saigon refused to comment
on the case.
"We have no records," a spokesman
said. "Everybody involved in the case
is gone, and the investigation is being
conducted under another command's
jurisdiction. We have nothing to base
a statement on."

killings
Khien said there was a long delay in
the investigation of the villagers'
claims because U.S. and South Viet-
namese officials could not get into
Song My until the Viet Cong left.
But he said he went there about a
year ago and was told that 370 civil-
ians were slain in Tu Cong and an-
other 90 in My Hoi. The colonel said
he could not confirm these figures be-
cause he had not spoken to any wit-
nesses of the U.S. sweep into the
village. '
U.S. military communiques for
March 16-17, 1968, reported that troops
of the American Division's 11th Infan-
try Brigade killed 128 enemy in fight-
ing in an area six miles northeast of
& ti BU

by GIs
Quang Ngai City. This is the distance
and direction of Song My from that
provincial capital.
In the United State, Newsweek mag-
azine and the New York Times carried
villagers' accounts of what happened
on March 16, 1968. Newsweek said as
many as 50 American soldiers have
been implicated by South Vietnamese
witnesses in the alleged executions. It
listed the number of civilians reported
killed at 567. The New York Times,
in a dispatch from Troung An, a vil-
lage near Sony My, also reported a
figure of 567 persons killed but quoted
villagers as saying 60 Americans were
involved.
YEWS PHONE: 764-0552
SINESS PHONE: 764-0554

'tr r't tt

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NEW YORK TIMES

Tuesday, November 18, 1969 Ann Arbor, Michigan Page Three

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I

HELSINSKI, UN

the
news to day
by The Associated Press and College Press Service

U.S.

-Soviet arms talks begin

AMERICAN BALANCE OF PAYMENTS deficits declined
during the July-September quarter. $2.5 billion more flowed out
of the country than came in despite an improved balance of trade.
Although the deficit was large by historic standards, the Com-
merce Department said it was a $1.3 billion improvement from the
massive $3.8 billion deficit of the second quarter.
THE SUPREME COURT rejected a challenge to revoke bail
set for H. Rap Brown in Federal District Court in 1968.
Judge Lansing L. Mitchell of New Orleans had forfeited $15,000
bail and set new bail at $50,000 because Brown participated in fund-
raising speeches for Huey P. Newton in Oakland and Los Angeles.
Under terms of the original bond, Brown's activities were restricted
to traveling to court appearances and to legal consultations.
In other action the Court let stand the conviction of four Univer-
sity of Kentucky students who had blocked a university office in which
the Defense Intelligence Agency was holding recruitment interviews.
The Court voted 7-1 that the appeal should be dismissed "for
want of jurisdiction." This means the justices felt the issue was not
one which would be proper for the court to consider. Justice William
0. Douglas cast the minority vote.
THE SUPREME COURT NOMINATION of Judge Clement F.
Haynsworth Jr. is being officially supported by two more senators.
Winston Prouty (R-Vt) and William B. Spong (D-Va) said
charges of impropriety and unethical conduct against Haynsworth
have not been substantiated. They also said Haynsworth possesses the
qualifications to be a good Supreme Court justice.
According to an Associated Press count, the Spong-Prouty an-
nouncements bring to 39 the number of senators who have publicly
declared they will vote for Haynsworth's confirmation. The count
shows 40 publicly declared against the nomination and 21 uncom-
mitted.
Earlier yesterday, Republican whip Robert P. Griffin said a poll
just completed shows 51 or 52 votes opposed to the nomination.
THE INTERSTATE COMMERCE COMMISSION h a s ap-
proved an increase of six per cent in general freight shipping
rates proposed by the nation's railroads.
The rate hike, which was opposed by ICC Chairman Virginia Mae
Brown, is expected to add $600 million to annual railroad revenues.
Mrs. Brown, citing this as the third rate increase since 1967, urged the
commission to investigate "the possible inflationary effects" of the
hike.
Although the ICC passed the measure, it plans to conduct an in-!
vestigation into the necessity of the rate increase. Should an inquiry
prove the increase unnecessary, it would be refunded to the shippers!
under the provisions of the proposal.
OKINAWAN STUDENTS attacked riot police with fire bombs,
stones, and bottled sulphuric acid last night after a rally demand-
ing the return of Okinawa to Japanese rule.
The rally began several hours after Japan's Prime Minister Eis-
aku Sato left Japan to meet with President Nixon in Washington to
discuss Okinawa's future and other topics.
Rally sponsors, the Okinawa Reversion Council, said 40,000 peo-
ple turned out, but police estimated the crowd at 15,000.
Leftists in Okinawa contend Sato and Nixon will arrange to turn
Okinawa into what they call "a permanent base for U.S. aggression."
JOSEPH PATRICK KENNEDY suffered a heart attack and is
reported near death.
The father of the late President John F. Kennedy was given theI
last rites of the Catholic Church on Saturday, according to one
family source, and members of the Kennedy clan have gathered at
the family headquarters in Hyannis Port, Mass.

HELSINKI (M~ - The United
States and Ahe Soviet Union
yesterday started long-await-
ed strategic arms limitations
talks.
President Nixon sent a message
expressing hope the talks will be
successful. He said the United
States stands ready to enter into
agreements limiting all types of
strategic weapons and reversing
the arms race between the t wo
powers.
Soviety Deputy Foreign Minister
Vladimir S. Semenov put no re-
strictions on the subjects h i s
Soviet delegation is willing to dis-
cuss.
"Curbing the strategic arms
race, the limitation and subse-
quent reduction of such arma-
ments ... would meet the vital in-
terests not only of the Soviet and
American peoples but also of all
other nations of the world," Se-
menov said.
Semenov and Gerard C. Smith,
chief U.S. delegate, drank cham-
pagne and chatted amicably af-
ter delivering the opening state-
ments of the two countries. With
their delegations they then re-
tired to a 30-minute closed ses-
sion of procedural matters.
Agresment was reacned to hold
the first business talks today at
the U.S. Embassy.
In related action at the United
Nations yesterday, the two pow-
ers urged approval of the U.S.-
Soviet draft treaty to keep the
ocean floor free of nuclear wea-
pons.
U.S. Ambassador Charles W.
Yost and Soviety Delegate Aleksei
A. Roschin made the pleas in
opening the annual disarmament
debate in the General Assembly's
main political committee.
Yost said success at the Hel-
sinki talks would exert a favor-
able impact on negotiations for a
comprehensive test ban and would
improve the outlook for agree-
ment to cut off production of
weapons-grade fissionable mater-
ials.
Roschin spoke of curbing chem-
ical and biological weapons. Two
rival treaties are before the com-
mittee - a British draft and ano-
ther submitted by nine Commun-
ist countries including the Soviet
Union.
Both the U.S.-Soviet draft
treaty on keeping the ocean floor
free of nuclear weapons and the
British draft on chemical-biologi-
cal weapons came to the United
Nations from the disarmament ne-
gotiations in Geneva. The Com-
munist draft treaty on biological-
chemical warfare was proposed
here by the Communist countries.

-Associated Press
A LUNAR scientific information center will be set up by the Apollo 12 astronauts, following a plan
close to the diagram above. The "Advanced Lunar Surface Experiments Package" is"expected to beam
data to Earth for at least one year.
Apollo 12 enters lunar orbit
as fl1t continues flawlessly

HOUSTON OP)-A crucial rocket firing came
off as scheduled last night, sending Apollo 12
into a nearly-circular orbit around the moon.
The firing, which alo slowed the rocket down,
occurred at 10:47 p.m., fourteen minutes after
the spacecraft passed behind the moon and out
of radio contact with the earth.
It wasn't until 20 minutes later that radio con-
tact was again established and the new orbit
was confirmed.
The firing put the Yankee Clipper and its fel-
low-traveler Intrepid into an orbit ranging 7 by
194 miles over the moon.
Apollo 12 entered the moon's gravitational field
yesterday as the spaceship began its fourth day
of flight.
At 8:38 a.m. astronauts Charles Conrad Jr.,
Richard F. Gordon Jr. and Alan L. Bean passed
a so-called "twilight zone" in which the gravi-

tational influence of the earth and the moon is
equal.
Once across the invisible line, lunar gravity
took hold of the spacecraft causing it to gradu-
ally accelerate from a low of about 1,500 miles
per hour to a high of 5,700 miles an hour.
The astronauts may have set a long-distance
seeing record by spotting a 58-foot-long rocket
stage more than 2,800 miles away.
Conrad told mission control Saturday night
that the Apollo 12 crew had seen what they
thought was the S4B upper stage of the Saturn
5 rocket that propelled them moonward Friday.
Later, however, Apollo 12 flight director Ger-
ald Griffin said further analysis indicated it
might be one of four 22-foot-long panels from
the spacecraft lunar adapter SLA that housed
Apollo 12's landing craft when it nested atop
the rocket stage.

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THE BEST OF MUSIC.. *

WEDNESDAY & THURSDAY 4:10 P.M.
NOVEMBER 19th & 20th
DEPARTMENT OF SPEECH JOIN US
STUDENT LABORATORY THEATRE
presents
THE DEATH OF BESSIE SMITH FOR
by EDWARD ALBEE
and
and TWO WEEKS SKIING
FINAL DRESS REHEARSAL
by JACK FRAKES IN
ARENA THEATRE, FRIEZE BUILDING
Admission Free
(Late-comers will not be seated) INNSBRUCK ?
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cordially invite the students C Hotel Accommodations
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Recruiter will be
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engineering work.
Interested in
students and graduates:
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The U of M Men's Glee Club
JOINT CONCERTS with

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