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November 18, 1969 - Image 2

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1969-11-18

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Page Two

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Tuesday, November 18, 1969

Page Two THE MICHIGAN DAILY Tuesday, November 18, 1969

musicQ
Gulli, Cavallo: Quiet,

Jack the Bear

By JIM PETERS
The Musical Society's Cham-
ber Arts Series has consistent-
ly presented artists of the finest
Caliber this year, though their
varvilug audiences have not al-
ways seemed to realize this. Last
night at ac:kham Aud. the con-
cert due of Franco Gulli, violin.
and Enrica Cavallo, piano, per-
formed to an audience who were.
for the most part, rather non-
plussed by their brilliance.
Unenthusiastic audiences tend
to destroy a musician's attention
to details, his devotion to his

craft, since he needs the em-
pathy.- of appreciative listeners
and the reward for his work.
But with those sure of their
skill and committed to their art,
the making of music itself is
enough. Gulli and Cavallo chose
a program without spectacular
effects, without the fireworks
and tricks which please audi-
ences, but no more. Their three
selections were selected to show
quiet, intense artistry, without
frills--serious music performed
expertly.
Ferruccio Busoni's Sonata in

E minor, No. 2, opus 36a comes
from the change-filled era of
the turn of the 19th century;
it is one long free form fantasy
divided into movements. Caval-
lo's sure mastery of the turbu-
lent opening section controlled
the rising melodic line through-
out the piercing declarations of
the violin.
Busoni's themes are only
touched with the late Roman-
ticism of his time; one gradu-
ally hears new ideas, new tonal-
ities emerging, especially at the
end of the langsam movement

intense
and into the presto, so the per-
former must not give way to
effusive sentiment, though the
aura of it is sometimes there.
Gulli is a master player; his
technique cannot be faulted,
and all his phrasings and in-
terpretation seems to have come
from an obviously thorough
knowledge of the scores he per-
forms. The variations in the
final movement, marked an-
dante con moto, were as ener-
getic and as rhapsodic as his
delicate high register playing in
the presto.
I did tire of a peculiar bland-
ness in Cavallo's playing of the
Debussy Sonata which followed.
Under the restrained emotion of
Gulli's tense violin, her lack of
attention to dynamics and to-
tally heavy-handed approach to
this last complete work by
Debussy only emphasized how
hard Guilli was working to keep
his tone bright. This showed-
off the artistry of the violinist,
but I expected a more spirited
equality.
Igor Stravinsky has been
known to shuffle various ver-
sions of his works around like
playing cards. He issues revised
versions of his ballets, piano
reductions, and sometimes or-
chestrations for various instru-
ments. The Divertimento play-
ed last night is a scoring for
violin and piano of a symphonic
suite from Stravinsky's ballet
Le Baiser de la Fee.
It was here that audience
finally caught on to quality
of the performance which up
till then they had been merely
sitting through. With this add-
ed dose of encouragement, the
pair on stage began the four
differing sections with the sure-
ness of consumate artisans. The
sinfonia introduction is broad-
ly written, using rhymic var-
iations and changing dynamics
to make way for the jaunty
Swiss Dances. Long melodic
lines are checked randomly by
forceful rhythms reminiscent
of L'Historie du Soldat.
With his intonation and
stylistics perfectly suited to the
often outlandishly cute Stravin-
sky lines, Gulli gave what must
be called a truely virtuoso per-
formance of this piece.
Encores are beneficient gifts
to audiences, thanking them
and displaying the pleasure of
the artist. Last night's b r i e f
Brahm's Scherzo was not de-
served. The few who knew how
well Gulli and Cavallo h a d
played were, no doubt, al-
ready satisfied with the con-
cert, and the rest probably did
not care.

WABX Presents:
GORDON LIGHTFOOT
Friday, Nov. 21
8:30 P.M.
FORD AUDITORIUM (Detroit)
TICKETS: $4.50, 3.50, 2.50
Tickets available at Ford Aud.
Box Office and at oil J.L. Hud-
son stores.
MAIL ORDERS: Send checks or
money order with self-address-
ed envelope to: Ford Aud. Box
Office, 10 E. Jefferson, Detroit,
Mich. 48226
In association with Audio Arts

NOV. 20 & 21 7 & 9:30
Natural Science Auditorium
Tickets $1.50

JACK THE BEAR, a play by John
East Bound Mound at Canterbury
aCouncil probes
youth activities
(Continued from Page 1
to work with other groups in the
city to help establish programs to
benefit the youth of the city.
Proposals included the estab-
lishment of a people's mall, free of
police, in several blocks of the
south camp~us area around the
South University business district.
Facilities would include a youth
hostel, a free healthiclinic, parks,
"liberated schools" and publica-
tions.
The Michigan Daily, edited and man-
aged by students at the University of
Michigan. News phone: 764-0552. Second
Class postage paid at Ann Arbor, Mich-
igan, 420 Maynard St., Ann Arbor,
Michigan 48104. Published daily Tues-
day through Sunday morning Univer-
sity year. Subscription rates: $10 by
carrier, $10 by mail,
Summer Session pubnshed Tuesday
through Saturday morning. Subscrip-
tion rates: $3.00 by carrier, $3.00 by
mail.

-Daily-Richard Lee
Slade will be performed by the
House tonight. FREE.
DIAL 5-6290
The motion picture de-
signed to save the world
from sanity.

MICH IGANENSIAN j
BEFOR E the price is higher
in the Fishbowl-Monday thru Friday
10-4
OR
Just return this card wxith $7.00 (check or money order
payable to the MICHIGANENSIAN) to the Student Publi-
cations Building, 420 Maynard. A receipt will be sent within
3 weeks after your order is received.
NAME__F___ ______

-Daily-Richard Lee

A fine forum of composers

By JOE PEHRSON
The Composition Department
of the School of Music present-
ed) the second of four concerts
of modBern works last night at
the Recital Hall on North Cam-
pus. This series, the Composers
Form, tea to ressudent works,
many of whi och vare products of
the Mus ic Sho' courses in
composition. If this concert is
represemiatie of the new music
compo at h campus, tie
variety f ne idas and gen-
cr quity of studeti works
approace, tihat of the well-
known works presented in the
contemorary festivals. ,
Details, Burton Beernlm1n,
is an exercise in minaturization
and qtie sounds. The focus on
individual sound events sup-
posedly created an atmosphere
of smallness and music in mina-
tur'. This was somewhat suc-
cessful, but the details, the
sotl"co" "os V none
too iteresting.
Meliss'a, Sutite for 'three
Flutes, by.Joan Harkness, is a
significalit departure in modern
flute sound. Normally, the con-
temporary flute is strident and
busy developing lines of expo-
sitiion. In this piece, the beauty
and purity of the flute tones
was emphasized. Structure was
secondary, and the areftIl use
of unison suggesd that per-
haps the sound of the flute has
been underestimated.

William Albright, noted for his
eccentric performances of
avant-garde and rag-time piano
works, added the two hands of
his wife Sarah in a duet espec-
ially written for this couple.
The Cats Meow, by Russell Peck,
was thoroughly Albrightlan in
tone, ranging from atonal key-
board punching to freewheeling
rag. This piece was as busy as
Albright normally is himself,
and the casual use of chromatic
jazz was as humorous as the
performance.
Cartoons for Solo Clarinet, by
William Hamilton, was one
soltitionto the problem of con-
temlporary solo performance.
Divided in three sections -
flarangue, Song and March,
this piece shifted its sound tex-
ture constantly, and while this
often created interest, it allow-
ed little room for development.
The Song, with pitches select-
cl from a serial row, was lyri-
cal in the Schoenberg tradition.
Unfortunately, this was s o o n
broken by gutteral sounds, many
of which are never heard from
the voice of the clarinet except
il error.
String Trio, by Stefan Ehren-
kreutz, developed a sense of
power with a rough and unusual-
ly harsh string sound. Ehren-
kreutz is more concerned with
texture and sound fabric than
with exposition-there was little
separation of voices, and con-

tent was minimal. The continu-
ity, primarily a result of care-
ful sound selection, was always
maintained, and all extremes
were compensated. The result
was a total sound, and a to-
getherness usually only heard
in Bartok.
Requiem, by Kurt Carpenter,
was a strange fantasy of sound
- evoking a mood of darkness
and primitive ritual. The sounds
were perfectly integrated, and
the occasional grunts of an en-
semble of druids completed the
image. The absurdity of this at-
mosphere, complemented by the
rather matter-of-fact manner
of some of tile groans, was
matehed by an absurdly intense
crescendo. According to Car-
penter, this represents Uncle
Sam's anal fixation, and a mar-
tial grotesquery which far ex-
ceeds any distaste a druid could
evoke.
Program Information 662-6264
GUTHRIE
AiiciEs,
COLOR by DeLuxe. United Artists
SHOWSAT 1 3, 5, 7 and 9
STARTS THURSDAY!
A man went looking for America.
And couldn't find it anywhere...
RAYBErRT PRODUCTIONS penU
eas r -
ReleasebyCOLUMIAPICTUrSf
CANNES FILM FESTIVAL WINNER! ,

KATHARINE HEPBURN as
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TODAY AT
1:00-3:45-6:20-8:55
FRIDAY
"HAIL HERO"'

ANN ARBOR ADDRESS-

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MAILING INSTRUCTIONS:
S 1 additional charge if you wish
the book mailed anywhere in the
world.

TV RENTALS
~10 per mouth
FREE Service and Delivery
---NO DEPOSIT REQUIRED---
CALL.
Nelac tV Ueintals
662-5671
SERVING BIG 10 SCHOOLS SINCE 1961
"Student Control
of
Student Money
-FREE CHECK CASHING
-ASSETS OF $145,000
-LOANS
Owned, Operated by and for Students

School (e.g. LSA, etc.)

RADICAL FILM SERIES
presents
THE YOUNG AND THE DAMNED
Directed by LUIS BUNUEL
Bunuel who is "an old hand at blending surrealist imagery with leftist social protest
has always had a special gift for making us see and feel the horrors with which
we know life abounds but which we so devoutly prefer to avoid discussing."--Life.
In Young and the Damned (filmed in Mexico as Los Olvidados) he presents a bru-
tal study of slum children running wild on the outskirts of Mexico City, where they
steal, beat up a blind beggar, attack a legless man and commit murder. Bunuel ex-
amines the piles of rubble, squallid hovels and garbage heaps where poeple scrounge
for food like animals.
"There is nothing imagined in this f ilm. It is all merely true." Bunuel
WEDNESDAY, NOV. 19 7-9-11 P.M.

dmission 75c
HOUSE--330

CANTERBURY

Ma ynord

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- ----------- = .

WHAT'S A

IA(g 42

Petition for
DLIS FESTIVAL
General Chairman and See
Petitions available NOW in
UAC offices, 2nd floor, Union
Dept. L

U of M Students
Credit Union

I st floor
Michigan Union
M-F-9:30-4:30
S-10-12

I

Phone 662-8500

' G

THE UNIVERSITY OF
MICHIGAN

I

low

. '
. . y

The School of Music and Department of Art
November 21, 22, 24, and 25
8:00 P.M.

Ann Arbor

Al

I'll

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