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November 16, 1969 - Image 2

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1969-11-16

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Page Two

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Sunday, November 16, 1969

P.ge Tw THE MCHIGADAIL

Black Arts Festival intriguing

Program Information 662-6264

HELD OVER
Mt Week

By LINDSAY CHANEY
Although the first annual
Black Arts Festival lacked tight
organization at times, it never-
theless presented a well bal-
anced and interesting day of
artistic events.
Typical of the organizational
difficulties were the panel dis-
cussion with artists which failed
to materialize because some
panelists didn't show up and the
delayed starts of two programs.
Highlighting the day's activi-
ties, sponsored by the Black
Student Union, was a program
"Black is . . ." which included
African folk dances and several
types of poetry.
The six-member Afro Folk
Ensemble started the program
with a selection of African folk
dances and chants. Accompanied
by the group's two drummers,
four dancers played several
rhythm instruments while they
danced.
The group did several num-
bers, best of which was a Ni-
gerian challenge dance, deriving
its name from each dancer's at-
tempt to outdance the other.
Each dancer gave his own lively
and energetic interpretation-
either "swimming" on stage,
doing calisthenics or becoming a
double-jointed marionnette.
RM
nsSCU
an equal basis with the faculty.
Only nine per cent wanted to
continue the present tenure sys-
tem in which the department
faculty decides on tenure ac-
cording to the recommendations
of a six-man faculty committee.
Last year the faculty denied
tenure to two sociology teaching
fellows angering many students.
Two others questions in the
poll concern curriculum -
a subject which is not yet an
issue but threatens to become
one. 76 per cent of those re-
See SOCIOL6GY, Page 6

FollQwing the Afro-Folk En-
semble, black poet Don L. Lee
delivered a rambling, somewhat
disjointed appeal for black na-
tionalism with his poetry inter-
spersed in it.
Lee assailed various aspects
of how black people convey an
image of themselves to each
other and to white society. Crit-
icizing television shows like
"Julia" and "The Mod Squad."
Lee said they do not present a
realistic picture of black people.
He cited one Mod Squad pro-
gram where the black hero was
jailed but allowed to keep his
hair long. "Everybody knows
that when they put you in the
slam, the first thing they do is
cutt off your hair," Lee said.
The Supremes, the Tempta-
tions, and Leslie Uggams re-
ceived the same ranking as the
TV shows. One of Lee's poems,
for example, derided Diana Ross
for letting success draw her into
the mold of white society.
Lee's poetry is characterized
by a rhythm and speed that re-
sembles a tongue-twister, but
never fails to bring across one
central idea. One of his poems
told of a black man who was

"super-cool, ultra-cool, always
cool." The poem is delivered
with such speed that the only
thought that comes through is
"cool"; then it ends ironically
with "but to be black is to be
hot."
After interpretive poetry read-
ings by James Johnson and Val
Gray-Ward, the program fin-
ished with a poetic tribute to
Malcolm X-"The Man"-de-
livered by poet Paulette Jones.
In addition, an exhibition of
art by black artists was in the

Union Ballroom throughout the
day, and workshops with the
artists were held in the after-
noon.
The exhibit included paintings
by Van King, Harold Neal, Jon
Lockard and Arthur Roland;
photography by Cecil Lockard;
an exhibition of black literature
and arselection of African
handiwork.
Painter Jon Lockard had an
especially impressive depiction
of a black Christ whose facial
characteristics were executed
with remarkable clarity.

-Daily-Randy Edmonds
Poet I al cray-Ward Speaks On black unity
ASK TENURE REFO
Query response stu

By hANNAH MORRISON
The Sociology Student Union
is stunned at the enthusiastic
response of undergraduate ma-
jors to a questionnaire on de-
partment reform.
Julia Wrigley, former chair-
man of the Union, said, "It is
not the size of the response that
is amazing, but how favorable
the results were."
Of 150 recipients. 114 return-
ed the questionnaires, respond-
ing favorably to questions con-
cerning tenure reform, open
faculty meetings and curriculum
changes.
The response is in sharp con-
trast to last year's poll where
only a small fraction of ques-
tionnaires distributed were re-
turned.
Bonnie Jean Bengel, present
Union chairman, attributes the
large student response to a re-
action to two incidents concern-
ing faculty meetings and ten-
ure decisions last year.
Of these who replied, 57 per
cent feel that all faculty gath-
erings should be open. All but
two per cent favored at least
some gatherings which students
could attend.
At, present one faculty meet-
ing a semester is open to stu-
RATIONAL GENERAL. CORPORA71TO _
FOX EASTERN THATRS
FOX VILLa6E
375 No. MAPLE RD.-769-1300
HURRY! ENDS SOON
MON. -FRI. 7:10-9 :20
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BUTCH CASSIDY AND
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NEXT-"Take The Money & Run"

dents. Last year when a num-
ber of students attenpted to at-
tend one of these meetings, it
w a s immediately adjourned.
Miss Bengel feels that all fac-
ulty meetings should be open to
students.
An issue which garneredeven
greater support was that of
student influence in tenure deci-
sions. 88 per cent favored an
electedcommittee composed of
an equal number of faculty and
students. Half of the students
would be graduate students and
half undergraduates, voting on

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