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November 15, 1969 - Image 8

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The Michigan Daily, 1969-11-15

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Page Eight

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Saturday, November 15, 1969

Page Eight THE MICHIGAN DAILY Saturday, November 15, 1969

Capital takes march 'with a grain of salt'

Congressional aides charge
FBI with bus liarrassment

By RICK PERLOFF
Special To The Daily
WASHINGTON - For the
past two days this city has seen
tides of ruffled students roam-
ing its streets, leafletting its in-
tersections a n d continually
marching, thumbing and honk-
ing a message of peace.
Washington watches these
antiwar protesters, many with a
smile of respect, others with a
shake of disgust. But most can-
not help but pay attention to
the dedication,athe signs, the
dress and the culture.
This city has long been con-
ditioned to protests so it takes
them with a grain of salt. "Just
another demonstration to me,"
say the men with the dark over-
coats on Pennsylvania Ave. But
even these men 1 o o k at the
White House March Against
Death procession and grudging-
ly admit that "the kids are sin-
cere."
"They remind me of Peter the
Hermit's crusade in the Middle
Ages," said one man.

He contrasted the students'
roughed up jean attire to the
ordinary dress wear of the busi-
nessmen. They are different cul-
tures - he seemed to realize -
the older had its views formed
and the younger was crusading
for change.
He did not s e e m to think
much of the marchers effect on
government policy; it was to
him a new fashioned drive to
replace the traditional through
parading in the streets. T h e
march was, he realized, worthy
of pause - and even some con-
sideration - but he could only
smile and continue his walk up
Pennsylvania Ave.
Three men walking together
glanced at the marchers and one
of them asked his friends wheth-
er he wanted a scorecard. "You
can't tell the players without a
scorecard," he jeered. A game
card characterizes the protest to
some Washingtonians; the dem"-
onstrators give their views and
the citizens watch and t u r n

their heads briefly before the
return to business.
But these men are part of the
larger number of citizens here
who support the President and
view the march as just another
student protest they are used to
in political Washington.
Though they admit it is an
out - of - the - ordinary and at
times impressive show of force,
they strongly - and irrevocably
- are committed to disapproval
of the antiwar views.
These people, especially, ex-
press fear of violence. The first
thing many say when asked to
describe the march is - "At
least it's peaceful." Little is said
of its positive or negative ele-
ments, as long as it is orderly
few can care what happens.
"I'm one of the silent major-
ity," said one man. He charar.-
terized the demonstration as
definitely impressive but wants
the protesters to realize there is
another side to the issue. He,
like others, would watch t h e

demonstration a n d perhaps
think about it, but he would not
change his views.
A second group feels entirely
differently. Generally younger
than the middle-aged group,
these Washingtonians feel the
protest is unique and special to
the city. They recognize there
have been protests here before
but believe this one is m o r e
"sacred."
The two groups are strange
streetfellows. They bothtagree
the march is impressive, both
pay attention to it yet b o t h
come away with different views.
This was manifest at a coun-
ter rally sponsored by a group of
secretaries and businessmen in
Farragut Square downtown yes-
terday. Their leaflets call for
'peace with honor' and say the
situation is complex but t h e
basic issue in Vietnam is rice."
Crowds surrounded groups of
youths arguing with the busi-
nessmen. One former newspaper

man shook his head discourag-
ingly. He respected the students'
sincerity and understood their
views. He only wished "ninety-
eight per cent would realize they
are being sucked in by radicals.'
The middle aged people in the
square were aching, it seemed,
to give their reactions to what
one elderly gentleman said are
the v i e w s of the "arrogant"
young people. The typical dis-
cussions on Vietnam ensued;
the domino theory, respect for
the President's level of informa-
tion a n d pleas of the conse-
quences of withdrawal. Then
the businessmen marched with
signs like "Khruschev said we
will bury you," and "Vietnam
will be the first shovel full."
T h e students returned to
"peace now" signs, buttons, and
the parade.
They both had argued, watch-
ed and shaken their heads.
They had, it was true, commun-
icated their views to the other.
But neither was ready to listen.

(Continued from Page 1)
New Mobe Chicago office pos d as'
a basketball team manager a'
short time later and was told ous--I
es were available.
The congressional staff report;
which detailed the other charges
also noted that there is a "list of'
35 schools whose buses were can-
celled and where there are in-
dications that there may have
been some FBI 'harrassment.'"
The list has not been made
available yet. However, it may in-
clude the University and Central
Michigan University, which suffer-
ed troubles of their own.I
The Michigan New Mobe had
attempted to lease a number of
DC-8 planes for chartered flights
to Washington, but was eventually
told the planes were unavailable.
The reasons given were unclear at
this time and the official involved'
canot be reached for comment
now.
Students at Central MichiganI
University in Mount Pleasant also'
had transportation problems. At-I
tempts to arrange chartered trains
were denied by at least four com-
panies in the area. A protest was
lodged with Sen Philip Hart (D-

Thomas Delaney of the Bureau the head of the Allied Bus Corp.,
of Operations, said the ICC also wijch was involved with the Can-
did not undertake to intimidate adian bus transaction, claims he
protesters, was contacted by the FBI. He also
"There certainly have been no told New Mobe officials that un-
instructions" to harrass cooperat- ion troubles barred him from sup-
ing bus companies," he said. He plying the buses he promised al-
denied a charge in the congres- though he later said he had made
sional staff report that "the ICC no commitment to them.
has been overly active in the last Finally, when interviewed by a
several weeks" in checking up on local New York radio station, he
bus companies for conforming to said he was in Europe the entire
ICC regulations, time negotiations were being car-
However, when asked if indi- ried on. However, Harpur College
vidual agents may have exceeded New Mobe workers say they have
their authority in, applying ICC a letter from New York from him
regulations, he said "some people during the period postmarked
sometimes do things they should- "New York."
n't do." In addition, the New York
"But," he added, "we'd raise Times, in an unbylined story yes-
hell with them if we found out terday said the president of a New
about any such activity."'E York company specifically denied
He went on to say that the having contacts with the FBI.
great demand for buses this week- However, an aide on Capitol Hill
end may have led to certain ir- reported a conversation with an-
regular situations which would other official of the company in
draw in the ICC. "If most regular which the official did acknowledge
buses were tied up, some bus own- that there had been contact with
ers not regulated by the ICC the FBI.
might try to lease their vehicles It is just such inconsistencies
to other licensed carriers." as these that have kept somn staff
Such practices, he said, although members working to unravel the
legal, would require additional confusion behind the FBI and ICC
surveillance. involvement with the current
The most blatant case comes anti-war demonstrations in Wash-
from New York. Norman Goldberg, ington.
- ---

War demonstrators

-Associated Press
A PARTICIPANT in the March Against Death pauses in front of the White House yesterday to shout
the name of a serviceman who died in Vietnam.
Police, protesters skirmish1
(Continued from Page 1) it dispersed in several directions. roof of a nearby drugstore was
However the Associated Pres One group, chanting "Ho Ho Ho used to start a street barricade.

on the roa
(Continued from Page 3)
"Nothing will happen at the
March Against Death or the
mass march." But some conced-
ed there could be trouble at
some of the secondary demon-
strations such as the various
marches on the Justice Departs
ment.
"People were "glad for the in-
structions to keep the demon-
stration peaceful." Some seem-
ed to want reassurance t h a t
everything would be alright.
But the inklings of doubt
which many expressed about the
possibility of violence were di-
rected at the Government, not
at other demonstrators. "The
administration is talking about
violence, not us," said one
sophomore girl.
People agreed, as well, t h a t
many in their number were new
to mass political action.
They were people who, as
one marcher suggested,
"wouldn't have gone to Wash-
ington two years ago" for the
last massive peace demonstra-
tion. And many of the marchers
seemed, beyond being new to
mass politics, to be relatively
abstracted from politics in gen-
eral.
"They are a political people,"
said a veteran of the 1967
March on Washington. It
wasn't The thing to do they. I
guess it is now." she asserted.
Left unspoken were the real
reasons for journeying the long
night for a n uncomfortable
weekend. No one talked about the
war or the policies of the ad-
ministration.
It was the silent agreement
of people who are already com-
mitted to action. They didn't
have to be convinced and they
didn't have to convince anyone
around them. For a long time
before they boarded the bus
their going to Washington was
more commonlplace than usual.
The march on Washington is
part of the fabric of their
thought rather than something
to be explained.
The bus rambled into the
capital, after a short r o m p lost

LI Mich),, who serves on the Senate
committee covering the railroad
in the service roads of na- industry.
tional airport, with the s u n An aide to Hart said the ques-.
already an hour up. Jokingly tion was investigated briefly and
asked why she came to Wash- early indications were that rolling
ington, one girl's answer was stock simply was not available
short but astoundingly c o m - for this weekend. He said the in-
plete: "I came here to protest." vestigation faded when the CMU
4------ - - - - 'students arranged for alternate
transportation.
S I Officials of the federal agencies
E sci UJ kS involved say they can explain what
has happened.
The Justice Department said the;
C0148 ts FBI was checking up on the pos-
sible influx of protesters only from
(Continued from Page 3) the point of view of safety and
specifically do you plan to do to ,was not attempting to intimidate
transmit the mood of this group?" or inhibit anyone from going to
Esch replied t h a t Nixon had Washington.
rnnet ingca inaw t k with C'narnr. I A spokesman for the ICC,

JOIN
THE DAILY
SPORTS STAFF
BRING US
UP TO DATE
Come In Any Afternoon
420 MAYNARD

,}
/.
4
m~ #VA .

Ieungs lase WeeK w~u Lonfress-
men and more were planned for
the future. During these confer-
ences Esch said he would bring up
the groups attitude and concern.
Discussion then shifted to local
Ann Arbor topics. The arrest and
conviction of White Panther lead-
er John Sinclair on drug charges
raised concern among the group
on "selective use of drug laws to
effectively shut up dissident lead-
ers."
"If a law exists that law must
be enforced uniformly," Esch said.
"I have not passed judgment on
whether or not selective arrests
are being made, and I cannot ac-{
cept the premise that it is being
used for 'political reasons'. "
In conjunction with political ar-
rests, some constituents expressed
concern over the possibility of us-
ing the existing detention cams
law which was employed during
World War II .to confine "dan-
gerous elements" within. the Unit-
ed States.
Esch said he had helped spon-'
sor action to appeal the lawV and E
added that it is presently being
revised and is "very likely to be
repealed."

CAMPUS

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reported that the tear gas was a Chi Minh, NLF is going to win."
response by police to rock throw- counterattacked with rocks and
ing. missiles of all sorts. .
As the clash began, the lights Police reinforcements began
were aimed on the area. Officers moving quickly into the area in
began moving through an eerie squad cars after outbreak of via-
foag down Massachusetts Ave. jlence. Students in DuPont Circle
clearing out demonstrators and threw objects against the sides of
bystanders.th et asie
Most of the crowd retreated the squad cars.
about one block to 22nd St. where I A drain pipe, ripped from the
positions open particularly to Dece -
. ....... .. :...:..: Iher graduates all over the country.

DAILY OFFICIAL
BULLETIN
SATURDAI, NOVEMBER 15
Day Caledar
Degree Recital: Catherine Warren,
viola: School of Music Recital Hall,
2:30 pi.
Degreo Recital: Jane Hamborsky,,
clarinet: School of Music Recital Hall,

Federal Scrow Works. Chelsea, Mlich.:
tieneral Draftsman and Estimator, no
plecific educat rion, some mechanical
ailit.y preferred.
Shuron Continental, Detroit: S a I e s
rep for optical products, will be in-
terviewing at Placement Services on
Nov. 24.
Sun Oil Corporation, Detroit: posi-
tion for girl as Interstate Customer re-
lations rep. Travel in midwest states,
suggest and consult on customer serv-
ices of service stations. Will be Inter-
viewing at Placement Services on Dec.
Local Offic: Loan clerk to assist in
loan dept., good typing, good with

Trash, stones, and flaming waste
cans added to the blockade.
One car rammed into a burning
trash can and sarted on fire.
Motorists fled. Handkerchiefs held
to their faces the demonstrators
fled from the billows of gas around
them. A number of the demonstra-
tors were seen in gas masks. Other
wore helmets.
ORGANIZA TION
NOTICES
I'-
University of Michigan Flyers presentj
Aviation Day, Nov. 15. Airplane Rides,
and films all day at McEnnan Airport:
Cars leave the Union for the airport
every 15 minutes from 8:30 am, to
4:30 p.m. For further information call
Dave Gell, 764-6660.
SPU-Resistance presents four new
iNewsreel films: "Vietnam North",
I "People's Park", "Day of Plane Hunt-
ers", and "Richmond Oil Strike"., on
Nov. 18, 7:30 and 9:30 p.m., at the
Newm xiCenter (331 Thompson). Work-
shops after each showing.
4 * 4
''he Ageless Science of Toga .
Ascana & oPsture class sponsored Self
Realization Fellowship. Call 761-9825
after 6:00 p.m.^
University Lutheran Chapel, 1511
Washtenaw. Nov. 16, Services at 9:30
ani 11, "Students as Stewards", by
Rev. A. Scheips (Communion at 11:00).
University Lutheran Chapel, 1511
Washtenaw, Gamma Delta, Lutheran
Student Organization, Nov. 16, 6:00
p.m. Supper-program, "Contemporary
Hymns and Worship",

PRICE $1.25

"TRY US, YOU'LL LIKE US"

RECIPE:
FOOT LONG POPPYSEED BUN
Lettuce and Tomato
Ham and Salami
Italian Cheese
And Our Own Special Dressing
5 P.M.-] A.M.-SUNDAY THRU THURSDAY
5 P.M.-2 A.M.-FRIDAY AND SATURDAY'
WE'RE SUPER QUICK BECAUSE
WE'RE RADIO DISPATCHED

1 FREE COKE WITH PURCHASE

WORSHIP

Vi

8:00 p.m. numbers, not necessarily degree, pre-
Indonesian And Indian Music: Uni- fer some exper.
versity Gamelan Society and Visiting

Artists: Hill Aud., 8:00 p.m.
General Notices
The University of Michigan S e n a t e
Assembly: Monday, November 17, 1969,
3:15 p.m., Rackham Amphitheater.'
Agenda: 1. Consideration of the min-
utes of the October 6 and October 20
meetIngs: 2. ROTC - Final report of
the Academic Afkairs Committee; 3. Re-
port of the Senate Advisory Review
CoImittee; 4. Assessment of Faculty for
Book, re
Placein cut Service
Current Positions open in the area,;
come in and brow se through o t h e r

For further information and to make
appointments for the following com-
pa"ics, please call 763-1363 General Di-
vision:
Harvard Univ. Grad. Schl. of Bus.
Shauron Continental, iDv. of Tex-
tron, Inc.
American Can Co.
Columbia Univ. Grad. School of
Business
Stromberg Datagraphix, Inc.
Rand Corp.
Sun Oil Company
National Security Agey.
Allstate Insurance Co.
Kent State Univ. College of bisiness.
Weeks of Nov. 24 & Dec. 1, 1969:
Last bulletin interviews being held
in General Div. before Christmas. In-
terviews will resume January 19, 1970,

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The ILNiwI Guide
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Complete, practical, up-to-date. Covers 500 study pro-
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FIRST UNITED METHODIST
CHURCH AND WESLEY
FOUNDATION
At State and Huron Streets
Church-662-4536
Weslev-668-6881
Hoover Rupert, Minister
Bartlett Beavin, Campus Minister
R. Edward McCracken, Campus Minister
SUNDAY
9:00 and 11:15 a.m. - "The Chanaina
Church: Problem or Progress," Sister Ann
Ida Gannon, Henry Martin Loud lecturer.
6:00 p.m.-Fellowship Worship.
6:15 p.m.-Fellowship Supper, Pine Room.
7:00 p.m.-"A New Faith for a New Cul-
ture" with Sister Ann Ida Gannon.
MONDAY
12:00 noon-Luncheon Discussion, Pine Room.
"Alternatives for the Future" with Rev.
Beavin.
THURSDAY
12:00 noon-Luncheon Discussion; Pine Room.
"Exploration Into God" with Rev. Mc-
Cracken.
3:30 p.m. -Coffee Hour, Weslev Lounge.
time for intergenerational dialogue.
FRIDAY
6:00 p.m.-Young Marrieds Dinner and So-
cial Time.
SATURDAY
1:15 p.m.-GO, GO BLUE!
BETHLEHEM UNITED
CHURCH OF CHRIST
423 S. Fourth Ave.
Telephoneu665-6149
Ministers: T L. Trost, Jr., R. E. Simonson,
W. C. Wright
Worship Services-9:30 and 11:00 a.m.
Church School-9:30 and 11:00 a.m.

UNIVERSITY REFORMED CHURCH
1001 East Huron
Phone 662-3153
Ministers: Calvin S. Malefvt and Paul Swets
10:30 a.m.-"Reparations and Reconciliation"
-Paul Swets.
5:30 p.m.-Collegiate Supper.
6:30 p.m.-"Reaching the Now Generation"
-David Bently-Taylor.
UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN CHAPEL
(The Lutheran Church--Missouri Synod)
1511 Washtenaw Ave.
Alfred T. Scheips. Pastor
Sunday Services at 9:30 and 11:00 a.m.
Wednesday Service at 10:00 p.m.
FIRST UNITARIAN CHURCH
1917 Washtenaw Ave.
Erwin A. Gaede. Minister
Church School and Services at 10:30 a m.-
Sermon Topic: "Sex: The Mysterium
Tremendum."
There will be no Student Religious Liberals
meeting this Sunday.
ST. AIDAN'S EPISCOPAL CHURCH
1679 Broadway
(at Baits Drive-North Campus)
12:15 p.m.-Holy Eucharist.
CANTERBURY HOUSE
330 Maynard
11:00 a.m. -- Worship Service - Truth and
Beauty on the Home Front.
THE ARK

FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST
SCIENTIST
1833 Washtenaw Ave.

SUNDAY
10:30 a.m.-Worship Services, Sunday School
(2-20 years)..
WEDNESDAY
8:00 a.m.-Testimonv Meeting.
Infants room available Sunday and Wednesday.
Public Readina Room. 306 E. Liberty St.
Mon , 10-9: Tues.-Sat., 10-5. Closed Sun-
davs and Holidays.
"The Bible Sneaks to You," Radio WAAM,
1600 Sundav. 8:45 a.m.
Fir transportation call 663-7321.
ST. ANDREW'S EPISCOPAL CHURCH
306 N. Division
8:00 a.m.-Holv Communion.
10:00 a.m.-Morning Praver and Sermon.
7:00 p m -Evenina Prover.
CAMPUS CHAPEL
1236 Washtenow Ave.
Rev. Leonard Verduin
Mornina Topic - "Not Quite So Fast," Rev.
Leonard Verduin.
Evening at 6 p.m.-"Lift Up Their Hands,"
Russ Palsrok, Seminary Intern.
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
1432 Washtenaw Ave.
Phone 662-4466
Ministers: Robert Sanders. John R. Waser,
Harold S. Horan
Worship at 9:00 and 10:30 a.m -Preaching
Nov. 2: The Rev. Robert Sanders.
HURON HILLS BAPTIST CHURCH
'3150 O(ZI,-rir' \AWnv

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