100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

November 15, 1969 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1969-11-15

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Saturday, November 15, 1969

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Seven

Saturday, November 1 5, 1 969 THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Wolverines

can't o
By JOE MARKER
Contribgting Editor
With visions of the Scarlet and
Gray from Columbus dancing in
their heads, Michigan could be
headed for trouble in its encounter
with Iowa today in Iowa City.
Although Coach Bo Schembech-
ler has termed today's encounter
"one of our toughest games," the
natural tendency would be for the
Wolverines to look past Iowa to
the clash with the top-ranked
Buckeyes a week hence. Such
thoughts could have dire conse-
quences for the team's Rose Bowl
chances, as Iowa, a young team
which has jelled in recent weeks,
is primed to douse the Pasadena
dreams of its opposition for the
second week in succession.
Just last week the upstart
Hawkeyes shattered Indiana with
a stunning 28-17 victory to end
the Hoosiers' aspirations.
If one looks at the compara-
tive record of the two teams, the
verdict would be heavily in Micn-
igan's favor. The Wolverines have
outscored their last three oppo-
nents-Minnesota, Wisconsin, and
Illinois - by a combined 107-16
margin, while Iowa has lost to
both Minnesota and Wisconsin.
However, in the Indiana game

verlook Hawkeyes

daily
sports
NIGHT EDITOR:
MORT NOVECK
last week, the Hawkeyes exhibited
something that hasn't been seen
in this section of the Midwest, in
quite a while-namely, a defensive
unit that can tighten up like a
bank treasurer's fist. As Coach
Ray Nagel relates, "Our defense
set up the last two touchdowns'

and contained Indiana's explosive
attack very well. We were especial-
ly tough on Indiana's passing
game, forcing Harry Gonso to fre-
quently run when he wanted to
pass."
This suddenly-surgent defensive
wall adds an unexpected dimen-
sion to today's clash, which on
the basis of statistics should be a
battle of two explosive offensive
units.
Led by quarterback Larry Law-
rence, third in the conference in
total offense, the Hawkeyes gen-
erally don't have too much tiou-
ble scoring points. However, Law-
rence, who has passed for 1290
yards this season, will be throw-
ing into one of the conmerence's'
tightest secondaries.

Michigan's primary goal in
stopping the Hawkeye attack will
be to shut off Kerry Reardon, who
gathers in the lion's share of Law-
rence's tosses. The value of Rear-
don and Lawrence in the lowa
attack was demonstrated last week
when Lawrence ran for one score
The Michigan-Iowa game will
be broadcast today on radio sta-
tions WWJ, 950 AM; WPAG,
1050 AM; WAAM, 1600 AM; and
WUOM, 91.7 FM; starting at
2:30 p.m.

TIlE LINEUPS
OFFENSE

MIChIGAN

IOWA

-Daily-.nSara Krulwich
Billy Harris (80)

(80)
(72)
(56)
(53)
(60)
(71)
(88)
(27)
(44)
(42)
(48)

Bill Harris (190)
Dan Dierdorf (225)
Dick Caldarazzo (22)
Guy Murdock (210)
Bob Baumgartner (215)
Jack Harpring (225)
Jim Mandich (200)
Don Moorhead (200)
Preston Henry (185)
Bill Taylor (195)
Garvie Craw (220)

SE
RT
RG
LG
LT
T E
GB
W B
TB
FB

(82)
(77)
(72)
(51)
(68)
(75)
(89)
(13)
(44)
(22)
(29)

Ray Manning (200)
Jim Miller (220)
Paul Laaveg (240)
Al Cassady (230)
Jon Meskimen (240)
Melvin Morris (250)
Don Osby (185)
Larry Lawrence (200)
Kerry Reardon (180)
Dan Green (195)
Steve Penny (210)

TREAK ON LINE:

and passed to Reardon for an-
other.
The rushing attack, on the
other hand, leaves something to
be desired, having gained only
slightly more than 163 yards per
game. Thus the game today fits
the Hawkeyes' offensive strength,
passing, against Michigan's defen-
sive strength, pass defense, and
the Iowa's rushing weakness
against Michigan's defensive line,
which can be run against.
Iowa will be entering the game
at full strength as Levi Mitchell.
the team's leading ground-gainer
returnq to the lineup after miss*ng
the Indiana game.
Michigan is also at nearly full
strength. Linebacker Marty Huff
who missed the Illinois game with
a knee injury, returns to theline-
up, replacing Mike Taylor, a de-
fensive standout against the Illini
Offensive guard Bob Baumgart-
ner's injured knee has also been
pronounced fit.
However, split end Paul Staroba
will not make the trip for the
Wolverines. Staroba, who has been
splitting the receiving job with
Billy Harris, suffered a jammed
thumb in practice and will be left
in Ann Arbor. Harris will start at
split end and sophomore Mike
Oldham will be available as a re-
placement.
Billy Taylor is starting at half-
back on the strength of super-
lative rushing performances the
last three weeks.

r
3
y
C
r
t

-Daily-Sara Krulwich
Don Moorhead (27)

BucksJ
MR SC
By PETE KENT
The spotlight on the Big Ten
will be focusing on Columbus,
Ohio, as the seemingly invincible
Buckeyes will attempt to extend
the nation's longest wining streak
to 23 games.
However, the assignment is
much rougher than usual as Ohio,
State will grapple with tenth-
ranked Mike Phipps and the
Boilermakers of Purdue.
Although Ohio State has not
budged from its top national rank-
ing all season, their opposition has
Pro Standings

face challenge

D)EFENSE

certainly not been the best. In
their first two non-conference
games, the Buckeyes romped over
Texas Christian, now 3-5, and
then Washington, which still has
not won a game. Then they took
on the bottom five teams in the
Big Terr. In all, Buckeye opponents
have compiled a 12-43-1 record
this season. So although the win-
ning scores have been impressive,
the opposition has not.
The last 4wo games of the sea-
son match Ohio State with the,
Boilermakers and Michigan, which
have a composite record of 13-3.
Actually, the Buckeyes are getting
their first real challenge of the
season in Purdue.
Phipps, the Boilermaker ace
quarterback and nation's total cf-
fense leader, has a personal score
to settle with Ohio State. A year
ago the situation was reversed as
Purdue was number one and Ohio
State played the part of the
spoiler. The Buckeyes won the
contest 13-0, and have held the
top spot ever since.
"They really messed my l-)es,'
Phipps recalled. "I was hit h'd cn
three straight plays. After th't.
I don't remember much."
Ohio State remembers Phipps,
though, especially from the 1967;
meting in which he comp'eted
21 of 31 passes for 210 yards -nd
two touchdowns in a 41-6 Pordtie
ronip. Three weeks later, the

Buckeyes started the 22-game
winning streak, which is still in-
tact.
"This man scares me," said 1ou
McCullough, OSU's d e f e n s i v e
coach. "In 21 years of coaching
I've never seen a better passe'."
A triumph for the 17-point un-
derdog Boilermakers could lump
Ohio State, Purdue, and Michigan
into a first-place tie at 5-1 each.
That would also put Purdue in ex-
cellent position for the Rose Bowl
bid, with Michigan the only other,
contender.
Michigan's Wolverines are favor-
ed by little more than one uoich-
down over the unpredictable
Hawkeyes, who all but squelched
Indiana's Rose Bowl hopes wjiih
a 28-17 upset of the r'acially trou-
bled Hoosiers last Saturday. I )N a
has a 2-3 league record.
In other Big Ten games, t 0e
Gophers of Minnesota, who op-
parently have just found t livi-
selves with two straight wins,
travel to East Lansing. Although
the Gophers are 2-3, they are sull
the underdogs against Michi n
State, 1-4, the team which vp-
parently has just lost itself.
Indiana will try to get back to
their winning ways with a visit
to Northwestern. Wisconsin ruuncs
out the schedule as they invade
Illinois, seemingly doomed to a
conference cellar finisn wii h an
0-5 record.

(55)
(82)
(39)
(92)
(90)
(33)
(97)
(35)
(29)
(24)
(25)

MICHIGAN
Cecil Pryor (240)
Pete Newell (22)
Henry Hill (210)
Fred Grambau (230)
Mike Keller (205)
Mike Taylor (210)
Ed Moore (210)
Tom Darden (185)
Barry Pierson (175)
Brian Healy (170)
Tom Curtis (190)

RE
RT
MG
LT
LE
[B
LB
RB
DB
DB
S

(88)
(78)
(73)
(65)
(83)
(63)
(10)
(43)
(20)
(24)
(25)

IOWA
Bill Bevill'(220)
Layne McDowell (230)
John Nelson (225)
Bill Windauer (240)
Dan McDonald (220)
Larry Ely (220)
Dave Brooks (210)
Jim Johnson (180)
Racior Cavole (185)
Chuck Clemons (195)
Chris Hamilton (185)

Wolverines Split two games
in water polo 'tournament

N Ill.
I. stern Division
Montreal 8 5'? 5 l
New York 9 4 2 20
Boston 8 3 3 19
Detroit 8 5 1 17
Chicago 5 6 1 11
Toronto 14 8 2 10
t'e'tern l)ix isio1
St. Louis 6 4 4 16
:Minnesota 6 6 1 13
Oakland 1 8 '? 10
Philadelphia t1 6 10
Pittsburgh 3 8 3 9
Los Angeles 3 8 0 6
'l oday's Ganes
Montreal at St. Louis
Philadelphia at Toronto
N.tew York at Blostoin
Det roitat Miuneaot a
Oakland at Chicago
Ls Angeles at Pittsburgh
Sunday'S Gaiocs
;Montreal at Chicago
St. Louis at New York
Los Angeles at Boston

61
49
50
40
33
35

G.A
35
39
3s
36
28
48
35
37
54i
36
41
38

Irish may accept bowl bid;
Aaron checks into hospital
.a
By The Associated Press
* SOUTH BEND, Ind. - There was a definite feeling around
the University of Notre Dame campus yesterday that if the football
Irish win their two remaining games and finish 8-1-1 they will accept
a bid to a post-season bowl.
Notre Dame President, The Rev. Theodore M. Hesburgh said
he had become "more open minded" after opposing post-season
games throughout his 17 years as head of the Catholic school.
Edward "Moose" Krause, Notre Dame athletic director, said he
felt there was a possibility of an Irish bowl game but it would be up
to the board of trustees whenever Notre Dame gets an invitation.
! CHICAGO -- Atlanta Braves slugger Henry Aaron checked
into Michael Reese Hospital Thursday for an extensive examination
of a back ailment which plagued him throughout the 1969 season.
Aaron, who batted .300 and slammed 44 home runs for the
Western Division champions of the National League, said he entered
the hospital on the advice of Braves' president William Bartholomay.
* MINNEAPOLIS - ST. PAUL -- Bernie "Boom Boom" Geoffrion
rejected yesterday an offer to coach the Minnesota North Stars of
the National Hockey League.
Wren Blair, Minnesota general manager - coach, said Geo'ffrion
told him he "doesn't have the desire to coach hockey again any-
where.",
r * #
0 COLUMBIA, S.C. - Paul Dietzel, University of South Carolina
football coach and athletic director, says the White House has ap-
proached him about the pending opening as National Selective Serv-
ice director, but did not specifically offer him the job.
In any case, he said Thursday, "I have no intention of accepting
any other job. I have the job here in South.Carolina that I want."
The 49-year-old former Army and Louisiana State coach said
he told his squad before Thursday's practice about the approach "be-
cause I didn't want them hearing any rumors that weren't true."
The post is coming open with the retirement of Gen. Lewis B.
Hershey.
* NASHVILLE, Tenn. - Alfred Reese, III, 22, a linebacker and
kicking specialist at Tennessee State, was shot in the head during
an argument inthe university cafeteria Thursday.
Police said Reese claimed he did not know who shot him and
did not wish to prosecute. Officers closed the case. Reese was hos-
pitalized in fair condition.
Reese, brother of Wayne Reese who is Tennessee State's leading
ground gainer, had kicked 16 straight extra points until missing on
his 17th try against Morris Brown in Atlanta last Saturday.

51
39
2i
244
3!
25

Big Ten Standings

By ROD ROBERTS
Michigan's water polo squad lostj
a hard-fought match to Loyola;
by a score of 11-7 in the final pre-t
liminary round of the MidwestI
Collegiate Water Polo Tourna-I
ment at Matt Mann Pool lastj
night. But by virtue of their ear-t
lier 18-7 win over Illinois-Chicago1
Circle, the Wolverines advanced
to the semi-finals that will be held'
this morning.C
In their first game, Michiganx
displayed ,a well-balanced scoringc
attack, as Steve McCarthy, Rory'
Moore, and Fred Nimke each
made three goals, while threeI
other players had two. The Wol-
verines jumped out to a 9-3 lead
in the first half. Although Illinois
closed the gap to 10-7 early in the
third quarter, Michigan ran away
with the game by scoring the last
eight goalsascored in a runaway.
Loyola got off to a quick 3-1
lead after the first quarter, but
the Wolverines came right back to
take a 6-5 halftime lead. But
Michigan's offense was all but si-
lenced in the second half, as the
Ramblers allowed but one goal.
Loyola Coach John Erickson com-
mented, We pressed a lot in the
second half, while in the begin-

ning we made too many mistakes." Hoosiers obliterated both of their
Michigan's Swimming Coach oponents yesterday, trouncing
Gus Stager was disappointed with Michigan State 31-8 and Ohio
the performance of some of his State 32-10, with Bill Burrell
players. "Too many guys loafed leading the scoring attack with 18
out there even though we were goals.
substituting as much as possible. Indiana seems destined for its
Of course some of the players got second straight Midwest polo title,
tired, but they're bound to in a as Michigan Coach Stager c(n-
game like this. In the last quarter. cedes, "We won't be able to beat
Tim Norlen and Bill Kennedy were them tomorrow. They're fast and
doing a helluva job out there; they play a very aggressively, but we
weren't afraid to swim the ball should be able at least give them
down and shoot. In fact, I might a good game."
be starting them tomorrow." Even Loyola's Coach admits,
The Wolverines will be facia "We're too inexperienced to handle,
Indiana at 10 a.m. today. The Indiana's team."
This .Weekend in Sports
TODAY
FOOTBALL-Iowa at Iowa City
FRESHMAN FOOTBALL-Notre Dame at South Bend
RUGBY-Notre Dame at South Bend
WATER POLO-Midwest Collegiate Tournament at Matt
Mann Pool-Semi-finals 10 a.m., finals 3 p.m.

N B A
Eastern Division
Ii' I,.- Pct.
New York 15 .941
Raitimore 9 6 .600
M ilwau kee 9 6.600
Philadelphia 6 7 .46"
CifncinIlantti 6 8 .429
Detroit 5 9 .357
Btositon 3i 10 .238
WesternDiision
W 1, Pet.
Aflanta1 1 3 .786
San Franicisco 6 6 .500)
Chicago 8 .467
Los Angeles 5 6 .455
Phoenix 5 7 .417
SeatlUe 9 .308
San Dieg 3 9 .250
Yesterday's Results
Baltimore 109, Boston 108
Milwaukee 122, Chicago 100
Phoenix at Los Angeles, inc.
Seattle at San Diego, inc.
Ulanta at San Francisco, inc.
Today's Gaines
M1ilwauikee at Baltimore
Detroit at Cincinnatti
Boston at New York
San Francisco at Chicago
Los Angeles at Phoenix
Atlanta at San Diego
lhliladelphia at Seattle

G It
6
6
8
11
G'B
41.,
41'.
6'.

Conference Games

Ohio State
Purdue
MICHIGAN
Indiana
Iowa
Minnesota
Northwestern
Wisconsin
Michigan State
Illinois

S'
5
4
4
3
,
1
0

L
0
1
2
3
3
3
3
4
5

T
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

PF
226
186
170
125
103
86
84
80
75
42

PA
41
117
59
91
128
115
121
175
142
198

W
7
7
6
4
4
2
2
2
3
0

All Games
L T PF
0 0 330
1 0 292
2 0 274
4 0 204
4 0 209
5 1 161
6 0 100
6 0 131
5 0 153
8 0 92

PA
55
201
120
168
224
240
240
300
210
302

SOPH
H
0
W.

$
F4(,
f
", '- ~:
t ,~"

S

DESIRED

r'
/ e'.

l.

I

I ____ _____ ____"

Budweiser.
K(INO OP BERMS,
THE LARGEST SENG BEER IN THE WORLD
bT LOV'iNW.ARK LOS AMQCCB AMPA
tr' STO'. COLQMSU3 .AC'~SONV 'L'

1
y
r
r

-" "' ,

Good Seats
Still Available

H
A
L

I
x
P

A

L.

m

0

J

Tonight 7:00 and 10:00
$2.50
Mendelssohn Theatre

F

i

.n

Back to Top

© 2017 Regents of the University of Michigan